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Full text of "Town of Wilmington Annual Report"

WILMINGTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 










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For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room 






1 History 
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Annual Report 



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DOUGLAS W. ANDERSON 
KEVIN P. B AC KM AN 
ROBERT R. BUTTERS 
GERTRUDE F. DONOVAN 
EILEEN K. FLETCHER 
PRESTON F. HOLMAN 
FRANCES D. KEOUGH 
FRANCIS J. KERRIGAN 
MARY E. LIPSKI 
MICHAEL J. McKENNA, SR. 
KENNETH J. MILLER 
THOMAS A MUIR 
JAMES S. RANDO 
KENNETH H. ROBERTS 
JEAN M. RYLE 
MARY WILKINSON 




(front cover) 

Brilliant Autumn Colors at Wildwood Cemetery 



Table of Contents 

Title Page 

Mission Statement 1 

Board of Selectmen 2 

Town Manager 4 

Administration & Finance Town Clerk 7 

Board of Registrars 8 

Town Counsel 8 

Board of Assessors 12 

Town Treasurer/Collector 13 

Town Accountant 14 

Public Safety Fire Department 34 

Police Department 36 

Animal Control Officer 40 

Facilities & Infrastructure Public Buildings Department 41 

Permanent Building Committee 42 

Department of Public Works 43 

Water and Sewer Department 46 

Human Services & Consumer Affairs Library 48 

Wilmington Arts Council 55 

Carter Lecture Fund Committee 56 

Historical Commission 57 

Recreation Department 62 

Elderly Services Department 64 

Housing Authority 68 

Veterans' Services 70 

Board of Health 70 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 74 

Education Wilmington Public Schools 75 

Shawsheen Valley Reg. Voc. Tech. H. S 102 

Community Development Planning/Conservation Department Ill 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 114 

Middlesex Canal Commission 115 

Inspector of Buildings 117 

Board of Appeals 118 

Town Meetings & Elections Constable 121 

Presidential Primary - March 6, 2012 122 

Annual Town Election - April 28, 2012 124 

Annual Town Meeting - May 5, 2012 125 

State Primary - September 6, 2012 150 

State Election - November 6, 2012 152 

Directory of Officials 156 

Boards, Committees & Commissions 157 

Officers and Department Heads 160 

Municipal Services Guide 161 

Meeting Dates and Times 165 

Accepted Streets 166 

Telephone Directory by Department 173 



WILMINGTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



The "Mission Statement for the Town of Wilmington" is as follows: 

"The Town of Wilmington, as a municipal corporation, exists in order to deliver a 
wide range of municipal services to those who live, work or own property within the 
borders of Wilmington; and in order to make this community a good place to live, to 
work, and to raise and educate a family, those services must be responsive to the 
needs of the people. They must be effective and efficient. Principles of honesty, 
fairness, dependability and compassion must govern the actions of the officials and 
the employees of the Town. Those who work for the Town as employees or as 
members of boards, committees and commissions are recognized as its most 
important resource and the key to its success in serving the people of Wilmington." 




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MM IN 



Town of Wilmington 

Office of the 

B Zt?Sf^r 121 Glen Road FAX (978) 658 _ 3224 

(978)658-3311 Wilmington, MA 01887-3597 tty (978) 694-iw 



Dear Fellow Resident: 

Throughout 2012, as the national economy trudged slowly toward recovery from its most difficult and 
challenging fiscal period since the Great Depression, Wilmington balanced the budget, offered an affordable 
residential tax rate and avoided the imposition of athletic, trash and similar user fees. With the capable 
assistance of the Town's dedicated employees, the Town sustained its level of services, increased its capital 
reserves, added to its inventory of open and recreational space and worked to improve the quality of life for 
its residents, businesses and volunteer organizations. 

After the Board of Selectmen negotiated the acquisition of approximately twenty acres of open space and 
recreation lands formerly known as Yentile Farms, Annual Town Meeting voters unanimously supported the 
initiative in 2012, by appropriating 81,182,500 to fund the purchase. Following the Town Meeting 
appropriation, the Board quickly closed on the purchase and formed a committee to elicit public input as to 
the most appropriate use of the property. Under the guidance of its chairperson, Selectman Judith 
O'Connell, the Yentile Farm Development Committee will lead the town's efforts to develop the land over the 
next few years. 

In addition to the purchase of Yentile Farms, the Town enjoyed other historic achievements and milestones 
during 2012. The Board extends its most heartfelt congratulations to the Wilmington High School Boy's 
Varsity Ice Hockey Team, which earned its first Massachusetts State Championship title in a thrilling 3-2 
victory over Franklin. The Board likewise offers its kudos to Head Coach Steve Scanlon, who was 
deservedly recognized by the Boston Globe as the Massachusetts Division 2 Coach of the Year. 

After years of planning, calendar year 2012 also marked the groundbreaking for the development of an 
affordable housing development at 1 Burlington Avenue, and construction is well underway. In addition to 
promoting a more diversified housing stock in the Wilmington community, the Town has used this 
opportunity to secure additional benefits for the Town, at no cost to the taxpayers. The water service in the 
Cedar Street and Webber Street areas will be upgraded, an easement to the Town will eventually allow for 
the widening of Burlington Avenue and a perpetual conservation restriction over five acres of the site, are 
just a few of these benefits. Attorneys for the developer and the MBTA continue to negotiate terms for an 
easement agreement, which would provide direct pedestrian underground access from the housing 
development to the MBTA commuter rail facility on Main Street. These plans represent a coordinated and 
concerted effort on the part of the Town to promote the economic development of the Town Center area and 
to enhance its use as both a commercial district and a transportation corridor. 

Also in 2012, Town Manager Michael A. Caira retired after more than twenty-two years of distinguished 
service. As of the date of Mr. Caira's retirement, the Town enjoyed certified free cash reserves in the amount 
of Sll,255,673. Mr. Caira certainly deserves the lion's share of the credit for establishing and steadfastly 
maintaining a lasting culture of fiscal discipline, while consistently providing top notch municipal services. 
The Board again extends its very best wishes for a healthy and happy retirement to Mike and his wife Jane. 

It is with enthusiasm and anticipation that the Board looks forward to working with Mike Caira's successor, 
and Wilmington's tenth Town Manager, Jeffrey M. Hull. On May 29, 2012, the Board voted to appoint Mr. 
Hull to a three year term. His vast experience in public administration, human resources, public 
procurement and collective bargaining, along with his commitment to the Town of Wilmington as the 25- 
year Assistant Town Manager, earned him the unanimous confidence of the Board of Selectmen. 



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On a less positive note, the Town's progress toward constructing a 21 st century state-of-the-art high school 
was temporarily delayed by a series of administrative appeals in 2012. Following the issuance of an Order of 
Conditions by the Wilmington Conservation Commission, which established environmental controls under 
which construction of the building could proceed, a small group of residents and one abutter (ab)used the 
state regulatory appellate process in a failed effort to derail the project. In the end, the Department of 
Environmental Protection has upheld the Town's position, but it is expected that these frivolous appeals will 
have cost the town approximately $1.7 million dollars. More importantly, they will have deprived the 
students of Wilmington a full academic year in the new facility. 

In the words of Henry Ward Beecher, "The difference between perseverance and obstinacy is that one comes 
from a strong will, and the other comes from a strong won't." Notwithstanding these unnecessary and 
substantial delays, and the costs resulting from them, the High School Building Committee, the School 
Administration, the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager Jeffrey Hull are united in the town's effort to 
bring this most important project to fruition, without requesting any additional appropriation from Town 
Meeting. 

The Board is eminently confident that this new high school building, which the students and residents so 
richly deserve, will be ready for occupancy in September 2015. For many years to come, it will represent not 
only this town's commitment to education, but it will also stand as a monument to the strong will of this 
community to prevail over the obstinacy of an obstructionist few. 

On behalf of the Board of Selectmen, I thank the residents of Wilmington for the confidence they have placed 
in us. We remain ever grateful for the opportunity to serve you. 



Respectfully submitted, 




Michael J. Newhouse, Chairman 
Board of Selectmen 




Board of Selectmen from left, Michael V. McCoy, Louis Cimaglia, IV, 
Michael /. Newhouse, Chairman, Judith L. O'Connell and Michael L. Champoux 



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Office of the 
Town Manager 
(978)658-3311 



Town of Wilmington 

121 Glen Road 
Wilmington, MA 01887-3597 



FAX 
TTY 



(978) 658-3334 
(978)694-1417 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen and Residents of Wilmington: 

The year began with high hopes for swift progress on the construction of a new state-of-the art high school. 
Plans called for demolition of the high school gymnasium immediately following the July 4 th celebration and 
for work to begin on the replacement of the football field. The project schedule called for the new high school 
to be ready for occupancy for the commencement of the 2014 academic year. 

Unfortunately the efforts of a very small group of residents and an abutter to the project site have needlessly 
delayed the project by nearly one academic year. The Conservation Commission Order of Conditions, issued 
in May, details steps that must be taken preceding, during and following the construction to reduce the 
environmental impacts to the wetlands. That order was appealed to the state Department of Environmental 
Protection (DEP). Upon issuance by DEP of a Superseding Order of Conditions, largely upholding the 
Conservation Commission's original order and administrative appeals within DEP one remaining abutter 
appealed the DEP's Final Order of Conditions to Middlesex Superior Court. The case is expected to be 
presented to a judge sometime in the first half of 2013. 

The consequence of this unnecessary appeal is to delay the opening of the new high school until late winter 
of 2015 and to increase the cost of the project. In spite of the efforts by this abutter and perhaps a handful of 
other residents, the project will be completed as envisioned. While the start of construction was delayed into 
2013, the town, its consultants and legal counsel have worked diligently to keep the total project cost within 
the $81.5 million approved by the town in 2011. 

The economy continued to send mixed signals regarding a sustained recovery. Congress's inability to reach 
a long-term consensus for addressing the nation's burgeoning debt and the looming prospect of another 
showdown over addressing the debt ceiling appears to have business leaders and investors cautious about 
expanding their facilities and equipment and hiring additional employees. This scenario was borne out 
locally when Analog Devices, a respected member of the business community, announced publicly in June 
their intentions to pursue an ambitious plan to increase the size of their campus by 250,000 square feet and 
to invest $200 million in that endeavor. In November executives from the firm announced that due to the 
economic market uncertainty, their plans are being placed on hold indefinitely. 

Lack of confidence in the economy as reflected in slow job growth and soft consumer demand has also been 
reflected by lower than expected collection of income tax and sales tax revenue by the Commonwealth. With 
collections through the end of the calendar year lower than revenue projections, Governor Deval Patrick 
announced plans to trim funding in support of state and local government. These measures if adopted by 
the legislature will have some bearing on the fiscal year 2013 budget. 

The local economy is showing some positive signs. Tenants began filling retail space at 1 Church Street, a 
mixed use development with retail space on the ground floor and apartments available on the second floor. 
This recently completed development creates opportunities for small businesses to locate in Wilmington's 
central business district and offers housing with easy access to mass transit. On the opposite corner of the 
intersection, construction of 108 apartments at 10 Burlington Avenue has advanced in earnest. Thirty of 
these apartments qualify as "affordable" in accordance with state guidelines. This development replaces the 
long vacant former Diamond Crystal business and bolsters the stock of affordable housing for families 
seeking access to mass transit and alternatives to single family housing. 



Due in large measure to the prudent financial stewardship of former Town Manager Michael Caira and the 
commitment to fiscal discipline exhibited by department heads and colleagues in the School Department the 
town's financial health remains strong. The town's financial reserves continue to improve as evidenced by 
the Department of Revenue's certification of the available fund balance in November which stands at 
$11,255,673. 

One means to maintain a strong financial position is pursuing opportunities to control costs. The rising cost 
of health insurance continues to place significant pressure on limited resources both in the private and 
public sectors. In a collaborative effort involving management and unions in the general government and 
school departments, changes were made to deductibles and co-payments in each of the health insurance 
plans offered to eligible employees and retirees. The effect of the changes increase costs for emergency room 
visits, office visits and prescriptions. Some of the changes such as increasing the cost for emergency room 
visits are designed to encourage the town's health insurance subscribers and dependents to seek treatment 
in more cost effective ways. This can be accomplished without compromising care. The annual increase in 
premium costs to both employees and the town are expected to be moderated as a result of this initiative. 

Investment in the town's capital assets and infrastructure continued in 2012. These investments included: 

• The purchase of four new SUV style police cruisers to replace the front line Crown Victoria sedan 
style police cruisers. 

• The purchase of one vacuum street sweeper. 

• The acquisition of one backhoe/loader. 

• The purchase of one 1250 gallon per minute fire pumper which is expected to be delivered in 2013 

• The resurfacing and reconstruction of 2.4 miles of roadways throughout town. 

• The replacement of a culvert pipe on Ballardvale Street. 

• Final installation of sidewalks and bituminous curbing along Lawrence Street. 

• In conjunction with the towns of Billerica and Tewksbury engineering design was completed on 
replacement of the bridge decking at the Whipple Road Bridge which led to bridge replacement. 

• Installation of two high efficiency hot water storage tanks at the Shawsheen Elementary School. 

• Installation of energy efficient insulated doors in each of the garage bays at the Public Works 
Garage. 

• Installation of energy efficient windows and doors at the Wilmington Memorial Library. 

• The oil fired heating system at the Public Works Garage was replaced with a high efficiency natural 
gas heating system. 

The year came in like a lamb and went out like a lion with unseasonably warm weather and low snow fall 
during the winter. The snow total for November 2011 through March 2012 was only 18 inches. During the 
fall the town braced for Hurricane Sandy which resulted in downed trees and limbs and over 5,000 residents 
without electricity at the height of the power outage. Police, Fire, Public Works and Public Buildings 
personnel were called into action and responded in a timely and professional manner. 

In a government "by the people and for the people" there comes a responsibility of the people to participate 
in governance. Wilmington is blessed with a culture of voluntarism and community service. Organizations 
like the Wilmington Food Pantry, the July 4 th Committee, Women of Wilmington and more recently the 
Wilmington Farmers' Market spend countless hours dedicating their time and talents to the greater good of 
the community. The same holds true for all the residents who serve on the many unpaid boards, 
commissions and committees that enhance the town's ability to practice local governance. Some of these 
posts are regulatory in nature and require decisions that place limits on the actions that fellow residents can 
take on their property. These decisions are not made easily and require a level of stamina to withstand the 



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expressions of criticism or frustration by those on the receiving end of the decisions. To each and every 
resident who has given of themselves for the greater good I extend my sincere "thanks." The fact that 
Wilmington is such a desirable place to live is in large part a reflection of the spirit of volunteerism and civic 
engagement. 

As volunteers are important to the success of this enterprise known as the Town of Wilmington so too are 
the dedicated men and women who work for the town. Whether they are maintaining the records of the 
town, enforcing the laws of the land, maintaining the streets, receiving your real estate or excise tax 
payment, assisting an elder to access the Internet or maintaining clean schools, these individuals all have 
dedicated themselves to serving the public. Their work is often overlooked and unappreciated by all but 
those experiencing their service directly. 

Several individuals retired during the past year. Town Manager Michael Caira retired after 22 years of 
distinguished service. As President Harry Truman so bluntly commented: "The buck stops here." Working 
with Mike over those years I saw firsthand the challenging decisions that came across his desk that only he 
could make. The hours were long and the issues never-ending. Through it all he exhibited integrity, 
optimism and dedication. Humphrey (Skip) Moynihan retired after 20 years of service as the town's 
principal assessor. His expertise on valuation and the real estate market were of great assistance both in 
his assessing role and with respect to economic development efforts. Other retirees include Deputy Fire 
Chief Edmund Corcoran, Fire Fighters George Anderson, Jr. and Robert Vassallo, Jr., Police Lieutenant J. 
Christopher Neville, Detective Thomas Miller and DPW Mechanic Steven Holloway. 

As I conclude my first annual report to the residents of Wilmington I extend my heartfelt thanks to the 
many people who offered such kind words of support as I assume this new role. The lineage of Town 
Manager's who have served the Town of Wilmington is distinguished. I will do all within my power to 
exercise the good judgments that are required to continue to move the town forward in a positive direction. 



Respectfully Submitted, 




Jeffrey M. Hull 
Town Manager 




Jeff Hull and Mike Caira greet residents at 
Wilmington Memorial Library's 
Community Fair 



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ADMINISTRATION & FINANCE 

Town Clerk 

The Town Clerk serves as Public Information Officer, Chief Election Officer and Local Registrar of Vital 
Records and Statistics. The Clerk is charged with the responsibility of ensuring that the appropriate 
process, with notification and procedure, is adhered to in the making of legislative policy and of managing 
public access to this information. This office is often the first door of government accessed by individuals 
seeking information and the resolution of problems. It is with a sense of pride and accomplishment that we 
submit this annual report with the hope that we have served our citizens well. 

The following information and vital statistics were recorded during 2012: 



Births 202 

Marriage Intentions 102 

Marriages 93 

Deaths 256 

Deaths - Out of State 

Burial Permits 191 

Veterans Buried in Wildwood Cemetery 38 



Flammable Permits and Registrations: 

Flammable permits are issued by the Board of Selectmen through the Town Clerk's office. Notice is sent to 
the owner or occupant of land where the storage is located on or about April 1st for renewal by April 30th of 
each year. Failure to register on time, or to comply with the Board's regulations, may result in revocation of 
the permit after a public hearing. Fifty-one permits were issued during the year. 



Permits & Recordings: 

Uniform Commercial Code Terminations 

Business Certificates and Withdrawals 184 

Federal Lien Recordings 

Federal Lien Releases 

Fish and Wildlife Licenses 

Pole & Conduit Locations 1 

Dog Licenses 2,131 

Raffle and Bazaar Permits 6 



The Town Clerk also serves as Clerk to the Board of Registrars. In this capacity she has met with the Board 
of Registrars on a regular basis, kept the minutes up to date and supervised all elections and the annual 
town census by mail. The Town Clerk's office also maintains current 
voting lists and registers voters during regular office hours. She also 
meets with the Board for special evening sessions to register voters and 
to certify nomination papers for candidates. 

Town Meetings & Elections 2012 

Presidential Primary March 6, 2012 

Annual Town Election April 28, 2012 

Annual Town Meeting May 5, 2012 

State Primary Election September 6, 2012 

State Election November 6, 2012 



Town Clerk Sharon George swears in 
Richard McClellan as Deputy Fire Chief 




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Board of Registrars 



In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3 of the town By-laws, meetings of the Board of Registrars were held 
as needed for the registration of voters and to conduct business. Under Chapter 616 of the Acts of 1958, 
these meetings were open to the public and press, and were so posted in the Town Hall. The Board also met 
many times for certification of signatures on nomination papers and assisted at all elections and town 
meetings. 

The Board held registration sessions as mandated by Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 51, Sections 26, 
28, 31 and 32 and supex-vised the conduct of elections, mandated by Chapter 54, Section 64 and Chapter 53, 
Sections 43 and 63, all in accordance with the Town Charter and By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington Revised. 

The calendar year 2012 had a total of 15,611 registered voters from our listed 22,417 inhabitants. 

The Board of Registrars wants to thank the many households that returned their town census forms in 2012. 




1. Advice & Legal Documents . Advisory opinions were rendered to various town officials and boards 
relating to a wide variety of issues and subjects. Frequent and ongoing attention was given to 
reviewing and/or drafting By-laws, easements, public document requests, compliance with the State 
Ethics Act and Open Meeting Law, various town rules and regulations, warrants for Town Meetings 
and other legal documents. 

2. Contracting & Procurement . During the period of our involvement with the town, we reviewed 
contracts, agreements, procurement documents and Massachusetts School Building Authority 
(MSBA) documentation. 

3. Projects . We assisted the town in connection with the Olin property contamination issue, new high 
school project, various real estate projects, betterment agreements, easement issues and 
controversies related to the impact of the operations of Krochmal Farm. 

4. Labor . Our labor specialists provided advice to the town on various personnel issues and collective 
bargaining disputes. 

5. Administrative Agency Proceedings . We assisted the town in various proceedings before various 
administrative agencies including the Appellate Tax Board, State Labor Relations Commission and 
State Joint Labor Management Committee. 

6. Miscellaneous . We provided advice to the Board of Selectmen, the Town Manager and various other 
public officials regarding a variety of matters. These issues included permitting and licensing issues, 
conflicts of interest, open meeting law and procedure, land use and zoning, procurement and 
competitive bid procedures and the enforcement of laws and regulations. 

7. Litigation, Adversary Proceedings & Claims . As of December 31, 2012, there were a total of 58 
lawsuits, adversary proceedings and claims pending of which we have been informed: 

5 lawsuits involving the Board of Appeals: 

• Charles Sullivan v. Bruce MacDonald, et al . Land Court, Misc. No. 179451. 

• Max Johnson v. Bruce MacDonald, et al Land Court, Misc. No. 179448. 



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• Scott Garrant, James Diorio, Kevin Brander, Michael Sorrentino and Ann Yurek as thev are 
members of the Wilmington Planning Board v. Charles E. Boyle, John R. Forest, Dan Wandell, 
Jr. as thev are members of the Wilmington Board of Appeals and Mark Nelson, individually . 
Land Court Misc. No. 267499. 

• Tresca Brothers Sand & Gravel, Inc. and Lehigh Northeast Cement Co. v. Town of Wilmington 
Board of Appeals , Middlesex Superior Court Civil Action Nos. 2011-CV-3909, 2011-CV-3910, 
2011-CV-3911, 2012-CV-0122, 12-CV-0123. 

• VIF/Ballardvale 181-187 LLC; VIF/Ballardvale 200 LLC v. Board of Assessors of the Town of 
Wilmington. Docket No.: F307067; F307068; F307069; F313628; F313629; F313630. 

1 lawsuit involving the Planning Board: 

• Robert Troy v. Wilmington Planning Board , Land Court, Misc. No. 274810. 

2 proceedings involving the Board of Selectmen: 

• New England Transrail, LLC Petition for Exemption , Surface Transportation Board, Docket No. 
34797. 

• Frederick V. Shine (Defendant and Third Party Plaintiff) v. Town of Wilmington (Third Party 
Defendant) , Middlesex Superior Court, Civil Action No. 2007-00677. 

3 lawsuits involving the Police Department: 

• Carter v. Wilmington , Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination, No. 06BPD01306 
(Police Department). 

• Robert F. Murphy, III v. Wilmington, Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination. 

• Teamsters Local Union No. 25, International Brotherhood of Teamsters v. Xpedx, Town of 
Wilmington, and Michael Begonis, as Chief of Police of Town of Wilmington , United States 
District Court, Civil Action No. 12-11961-DJC. 

2 proceedings involving the Public Buildings Department: 

• Holden v. Town of Wilmington . DIA No. 890508. 

• AFSCME Council 93. Local 1703 v. Town of Wilmington . AAA No. 11 390 00819 12. 
2 proceedings involving the Inspector of Buildings: 

• Nelson v. Town of Wilmington Building Commissioner . Code Appeals Board, Docket No. 12-1186. 

• Nelson v. Town of Wilmington Building Inspector, et al. . Middlesex Superior Court, Civil Action 
No. 2012-4873. 

1 proceeding involving the Water and Sewer Commission: 

• Wilmington v. Department of Environmental Protection , DEP Docket No. 2008-047. 

2 proceedings involving the Department of Veterans' Services: 

• Town of Wilmington (Robert Palazzi) v. Department of Veterans' Services , No. VS- 10-757. 

• Robert Palazzi v. Department of Veterans' Services. Town of Wilmington , Division of 
Administrative Law Appeals, Docket No. VS- 11-413. 

3 proceedings involving the Conservation Commission: 

• App Tree, Inc. and Robert Riley, Jr. (27 Gunderson Road) . 

• Wilmington v. App Tree, Inc. , Middlesex Superior Court, Civil Action No. 11-2940. 

• Gerald O'Reilly v. Town of Wilmington, et al. , Middlesex Superior Court, Civil Action No. 12- 
4510. 

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3 lawsuits involving the Board of Assessors: 

• Kaiser Realty Trust v. Board of Assessors of the Town of Wilmington , Appellate Tax Board 
Docket No. F310035. 

• Mark D. Nelson, Power of Attorney for George Nelson v. Board of Assessors of the Town of 
Wilmington , Appellate Tax Board Docket No. F3 10076. 

• Ann & John Krochmal c/o John Cave v. Board of Assessors of the Town of Wilmington , Appellate 
Tax Board Docket No. F305526. 

1 lawsuit involving the Department of Public Works: 

• Johnson v. Moaklev et al. and Town of Wilmington . Middlesex Superior Court, C.A. No. 07- 
02271-B. 

1 lawsuit involving the Board of Public Health: 

• Krochmal Farm LLC v. Wilmington Board of Health , Middlesex Superior Court, C.A. No. 08- 
04810-L2. 

1 lawsuit involving the Public Buildings Department: 

• AFSCME Council 93, Local 1703 v. Town of Wilmington. AAA No. 11 390 01254 12. 
31 claims which are not yet lawsuits: 

• Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection v. Town of Wilmington (Maple Meadow 
Landfill). 

• Town of Wilmington v. Olin Chemical Corporation . 

• Witmore v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Liberty Mutual as subrogee for Tentmakers Moving LLC v. Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Kiesinger v. Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Galante v. Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Gillis v. Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Duffy v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Emrich v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• David Boutiette v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• O'Neil v. Town of Wilmington (DPW). 

• Hermann v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Lemos v. Town of Wilmington (School) . 

• Pupa v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Martiniello v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Plummer v. Town of Wilmington (Conservation Commission) . 

• Gore v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Coates v. Town of Wilmington (Police Department) . 

• Jordan v. Wilmington (Schools) . 

• Reposa v. Wilmington (Schools) . 

• MescahVArbella Insurance v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Lucio v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Murphy v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Ventre v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Conrad v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Hawlev v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

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• Fire Fighter Jason Kennedy v. the Town of Wilmington (Fire Department) . 

• Mark D. Nelson's Request for a copy of a May 4, 2012 letter of Town Counsel to Town of 
Wilmington clients (Town Clerk) . 

• Rann Tingtella Return to Work Issues (Fire Department) . 

• Humphrey "Skip" Moynihan FMLA/ADA Issues (Principal Assessor) . 

• International Association of Fire Fighters Negotiations . 

Each of the above efforts required the participation of numerous town officials and private citizen volunteers 
- all working together towards a better Wilmington. 

Thanks to the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, and all other town officials and citizens for their 
cooperation and assistance towards another successful year. 




Louis Cimaglia, W, Robert Ska, 1 st Place Winner 6 th Grade 
Essay Contest, and Michael L. Champoux 
at Massachusetts Municipal Association Dinner 



Robert Sica was recognized by the Board of Selectmen for 
winning first place in the MMA 6 th Grade Essay Contest 




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Board of Assessors 



RECAPITULATION - 2012 FISCAL YEAR 



lotai /\ppiopi laiion 




Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 


449,384.00 


Air Pollution District 


7,006.00 


Metropolitan Area Planning Council 


6,807.00 


Mosquito Control Project 


47,873.00 


Tuition Assessment 


115,014.00 


Overlay of Current Year 


700,000.05 


Cherry Sheet Offsets 


42,600.00 


Final Court Judgments 


0.00 


RMV Non-Renewal Surcharge 


7,860.00 


Miscellaneous 


838.00 


Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 




2012 Estimated Receipts from Local Aid $12,548,230.00 


Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 


2,799,779.00 


Penalties and Interest on Taxes 


300,000.00 


Payments in Lieu of Taxes 


740,000.00 


Charges for Services - Sewer 


2,203,628.00 


Other Charges for Services 


380,000.00 


Fees 


78,000.00 


Rentals 


100,000.00 


Departmental Revenue - School 


1,000.00 


Departmental Revenue - Library 


12,000.00 


Departmental Revenue - Cemetery 


80,000.00 


Other Department Revenue 


100,000.00 


Licenses and Permits 


400,000.00 


Special Assessments 


1,000.00 


Fines and Forfeits 


130,000.00 


Investment Income 


100,000.00 


Voted from Available Funds 


949,910.00 


Miscellaneous Recurring 




Real Estate Assessed Value 


Residential $2,626,586,102.00 


@ 12.14 p/t 


Commercial $ 142,163,270.00 


@ 28.64 p/t 



$77,309,149.00 



Industrial 
Personal Property 



$ 672,253,028.00 @ 28.64 p/t 
$ 89.083.310.00 @ 28.64 p/t 
$3,530,085,710.00 



1.377.382.05 
$78,686,531.05 




Principal Assessor Karen Rassias with 
retired Assessors Humphrey /. "Skip" 
Moynihan and Anthony Krzeminski 



$20.923.547.00 

Tax 

31,886,755.28 
4,071,556.05 

19,253,326.72 
2,551.346.00 
$57,762,984.05 



-12- 



TREASURER/ COLLECTOR 

Commitments 



2013 Preliminary Real Estate 


$28,180,324 


81 


2012 Real Estate 


55,211,638 


08 


2013 Preliminary Personal Property 


1,285,826 


53 


2012 Personal Property 


2,551,346 


03 


2012 Excise 


2,913,582 


49 


2011 Excise 


313,375 


45 


Ambulance 


1,238,894 


44 


Apportioned Sewer Betterments 


40,801 


66 


Interest 


15,557 


86 


Sewer Liens 


H A A AO 

74,442 


82 


Water Liens 




ob 


Electric Liens 


18,bbl 


bb 


Apportioned Title 5 Betterments 


34,790 


25 


Interest 


10,654 


77 


total 


$92, 12b, 290 


21 


Collections 






Real Estate 


$54,645,001 


36 


Personal Property 


2,518,043 


04 


Excise 


3,182,095 


62 


Sewer Betterments 


52,995 


33 


Title 5 Betterments 


53,463 


62 


Water Liens 


230,396 


84 


Sewer Liens 


77,834 


01 


Electric Liens 


14,774 


87 


Tree Liens 


1,815 


14 


Excise Interest & Charges 


121,356 


85 


Ambulance 


811,333 


30 


Lien Certificates 


29,327 


00 


Betterment Certificates 


92 


00 


Miscellaneous 


66 


86 


Water Collections 


3,958,564 


72 


Sewer Collections 


2,378,053 


60 


Real Estate Interest & Charges 


213,809 


07 


Personal Property Interest & Charges 


6,705 


73 


Tax Titles 


88,249 


29 


Tax Title Interest 


53.003 


61 


Total 


$68,436,981 


86 



-13- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
AND REPORT OF THE TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2012 



Members of the Board of Selectmen 

and Town Manager 
Town Hall 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 01887 

The Annual General Purpose Financial Statements of the town of Wilmington for the fiscal year ended June 
30, 2012 are hereby submitted. This report was prepared by the Office of the Town Accountant. 
Responsibility for accuracy of the data and the completeness and fairness of the presentation, including all 
disclosures, rests with the town. 

To the best of our knowledge and belief, the enclosed data are accurate in all material respects and are 
reported in a manner designed to present fairly the financial position and results of operations of the various 
funds and account groups of the government. 



RespectfuDy submitted, 




Michael Morris 
Town Accountant 



-14- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMPREHENSIVE ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2012 

Table of Contents 

PAGE 



Combined Balance Sheet-All Fund Types and Account Groups 16 

Notes to Financial Statements 17 

Schedule of Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 
and Changes in Fund Balances-All Governmental Fund 

Types and Expendable Trust Funds 21 

Schedule of Combined Balance Sheet-Special Revenue Accounts 22 
Schedule of Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 

and Changes in Fund Balance-Special Revenue Accounts 23 
Schedule of Expenditures and Encumbrances Compared with 

Authorization by Function and Activity -General Fund 24 

Schedule of Revenues and Expenditures-Water Fund 29 

Schedule of Revenues and Expenditures-Capital Projects Fund 30 

Schedule of Debt Retirement 31 

Schedule of Trust and Agency Funds 32 



-15- 



Assets 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET - ALL FUND GROUPS 
ALL FUND TYPES AND ACCOUNT GROUPS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2012 



Special 
Revenue 



Capital 
Projects 



Trust & 
Agency 



Long-Term 
Debt 



Total 
(Memorandum 
Only) 



Cash 
Receivables: 

General Property Taxes 1,928,051.43 

Less: Prov for Abates & Exemptions (1,704,978.05) 



16,878,593.50 11,996,523.30 43,293,913.42 3,406,058.77 



Tax Liens 

Tax Foreclosures 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Departmental 

Betterments 

User Charges 
Due from Other Gov'ts 
Amounts to be provided for: 

Retirement of Long Term Debt 



923,191.09 
650,503.69 
612,678.15 
164,264.72 
538,717.72 
87,249.72 



299,717.20 
9,898.50 



26,359.00 



75,575,088.99 

1,928,051.43 
(1,704,978.05) 
923,191.09 
650,503.69 
612,678.15 
164,264.72 
538,717.72 
386,966.92 
36,257.50 

48,813,740.71 48,813,740.71 



Total Assets 



20,078,271.97 12,306,139.00 43,320,272.42 3,406,058.77 48,813,740.71 127,924,482.87 



Liabilities & Fund Balance 



Liabilities: 

Warrants Payable 

Deferred Revenue: 
General Property Taxes 
Other Accounts Receivable 

Notes Payable 

Payroll Withholdings Payable 
Incurred Costs 



1,336,213.41 348,952.49 



1,928,051.43 
2,976,605.09 

(74,518.90) 



309,615.70 



26,359.00 



179,728.43 1,864,894.33 

1,928,051.43 
3,312,579.79 
48,813,740.71 48,813,740.71 
(74,518.90) 



Total Liabilities 



6,166,351.03 658,568.19 



26,359.00 179,728.43 48,813,740.71 55,844,747.36 



Fund Balance: 
Res. For Encumbrances 
Res. For Special Purpose 
Res. For Special Purpose Water 
Res. For Subsequent Years 
Unreserved-Undesignated 



1,873,611.89 1,286,206.53 

8,355,054.64 43,230,890.50 3,206,330.34 
951,175.64 

600,000.00 1,055,134.00 59,407.00 20,000.00 

11,438,309.05 3,615.92 



3,159,818.42 
54,792,275.48 
951,175.64 

1,734,541.00 
11,441,924.97 



Total Fund Balance 



13,911,920.94 11,647,570.81 43,293,913.42 3,226,330.34 



0.00 72,079,735.51 



Total Liabilities & Fund Balance 



20,078,271.97 12,306,139.00 43,320,272.42 3,406,058.77 48,813,740.71 127,924,482.87 



-16- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
JUNE 30, 2012 



1. Definition of Reporting Entity 

The Town of Wilmington is incorporated as a municipality in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
It is governed by an elected Board of Selectmen and an open Town Meeting. The Board of Selectmen 
appoint a Town Manager who in accordance with Chapter 592 of 1950, serves as chief fiscal and 
administrative officer of the town. Other town officials are appointed by the Board of Selectmen and 
the Town Manager. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) requires that the 
accompanying general purpose financial statements present the Town of Wilmington (the primary 
government) and its component units. Component units are included in the Town's reporting entity 
if their operational and financial relationships with the Town are significant. Pursuant to this 
criteria, the following entities have been excluded from the accompanying general purpose financial 
statements: 

Wilmington Housing Authority - provides housing for the elderly as well as 
subsidizing low income housing units. 

Middlesex Regional Retirement System - provides county government and various 
services for member communities. 

Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School District - provides 
education services for member communities. 

Massachusetts Water Resources Authority - provides sewage disposal services and 
supplements the water supply. 

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies 

The accounting policies for financial reporting purposes of the town of Wilmington conform to 
generally accepted accounting principles for local governmental units except as indicated in Note 3. 
The following is a summary of the significant accounting policies: 

A. Fund Accounting 

The town reports its financial activities in several funds and one account group in order to 
comply with the limitations and restrictions placed on both the resources made available to 
the town and the services provided. The various funds are grouped in the financial 
statements in this report into five generic fund types as follows: 

Governmental Funds 

General Fund - The general fund is the general operating fund of the town. It is used to 
account for all financial resources except those required to be accounted for in another fund. 

Special Revenue Fund - Special revenue funds are used to account for the proceeds of specific 
revenue resources (other than expendable trust or major capital projects) that are legally 
restricted to expenditures for specific purposes. 

Capital Projects Fund - Capital project funds are used to account for financial resources to be 
used for the acquisition or construction of major capital facilities or equipment. 



-17- 



Fiduciary Funds 



Trust and Agency Funds - Trust and agency funds are used to account for assets held by the 
town in a trustee capacity or as an agent for individuals, private organizations, other 
governments and/or other funds. These include expendable trust, non-expendable trust and 
agency funds. Non-expendable trust funds are accounted for in a manner that permits the 
periodic measurements of revenues earned, expenses incurred and/or net income in order to 
demonstrate maintenance of capital. Expendable trust funds are accounted for in essentially 
the same manner as governmental funds. Agency funds are custodial in nature (assets equal 
liabilities) and do not involve measurement of results of operations. 

ACCOUNT GROUP 

Long-term Debt and Liabilities - Long-term liabilities expected to be financed from 
governmental funds are accumulated in the general long-term debt group of accounts. This 
account group is not a fund. It is only concerned with the measurement of financial position 
and, therefore, is not involved with a measurement of the results from any operations. 

Basis of Accounting 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared principally on the modified 
accrual basis of accounting. This method recognizes revenues when they become measurable 
and available. Expenses are recognized under this method as they are incurred. 

Revenue - Property tax revenues are recognized when they become available. Available 
means then due or past due and receivable within the current period or expected to be 
collected soon enough thereafter to be used to pay liabilities of the current period. 

All other revenues are recognized throughout the year when cash is received. 

In applying the susceptible to accrual concept to intergovernmental revenues, the legal and 
contractual requirements of the numerous individual programs are used as guidance. There 
are, however, essentially two types of these revenues. In one, moneys must be expended on 
the specific purpose or project before any amounts will be paid to the town. Therefore, 
revenues are recognized based upon the expenditures recorded. In the other, moneys are 
virtually unrestricted as to purpose of expenditure and are usually revocable only for failure 
to comply with prescribed compliance requirements. These resources are reflected as 
revenues at the time of receipt or earlier if the susceptible to accrual criteria is met. 

Expenses - Expenditures are recorded during the year on a cash disbursement basis. In 
addition, as required by Massachusetts General Laws, disbursements made during the 
fifteen days immediately following the close of each fiscal year and which pertain to the prior 
year are recorded as warrants payable and expenses as of June 30th. 

Purchase orders and other contractual obligations outstanding at June 30th related to 
annual operating expenses are recorded as encumbrances and, accordingly, as a reservation 
of fund balances at that date. 

Deferred Revenue - Property taxes and other revenue that is measurable but not available 
has been classified as deferred revenue on June 30th. 

Encumbrances - Encumbrance accounting under which purchase orders, contracts and other 
commitments for the expenditure of funds are recorded in order to reserve that portion of the 
applicable appropriation, is employed in governmental funds. Open encumbrances at year- 
end are reported as reservations of fund balances. Encumbrances do not constitute 
expenditures or liabilities. 



-18- 



Inventory - Inventory items (materials and supplies) are recorded as expenditures when 
purchased (purchase method). 



General Fixed Assets - General fixed assets are recorded as expenditures in applicable 
governmental funds. The town does not capitalize the cost of general fixed assets in a 
general fixed asset account group, which is consistent with the practice of municipalities in 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

C. Total Columns 

Total columns on the combined statements are captioned Memorandum Only to indicate that 
they are presented only to facilitate financial analysis. Data in these columns do not present 
financial position, results of operations or changes in financial position in conformity with 
generally accepted accounting principles. Such data is not comparable to a consolidation 
since interfund eliminations have not been made. 

D. Retirement System 

The Town contributes to the Middlesex Regional Retirement System, a single employer plan, 
established under Chapter 32 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Substantially all full-time and some part-time employees of the town except teachers and 
certain administrative personnel employed by the School Department participate in the 
system. Benefits paid under the plan, referred to as retirement allowance, include both an 
annuity portion, funded principally from amounts contributed by the participants, and a 
pension portion funded by the town. 

The participants contribute a certain percentage of their compensation annually, determined 
by their date of employment. The Town's employer contribution as determined by the 
County's actuarial valuation is determined by normal cost plus the amortization of the 
original unfunded actuarial liability. 

Teachers and certain administrative employees of the School Department participate in a 
contributory retirement plan administered by the Massachusetts Teachers Retirement 
Board. Contributions to this plan are made entirely by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, and therefore, the town does not contribute to the plan. 

Departures from Generally Accepted Accounting Principles 

For years prior to 1985, the town presented its financial statements on the basis of accounting 
practices prescribed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Department of Revenue. These 
practices differed in many significant respects from G.A.A.P. 

During 1981, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts issued a revised uniform municipal accounting 
system entitled Uniform Municipal Accounting System. The departures from G.A.A.P. under this 
revised system have been significantly narrowed. The town has adopted a modified Uniform 
Municipal Accounting System for its financial statements. 

The significant departures from Generally Accepted Accounting Principals included in the Town of 
Wilmington's financial statements are: 

A. Retirement benefits are provided for in accordance with Chapter 32 of the Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts (see note ID). 

B. General fixed asset acquisitions are recorded as expenditures at the time purchases is made 
rather than being capitalized in a general fixed asset group of accounts. 

C. Purchases for materials and supplies inventories are recorded as expenditures rather than 
assets at time of purchase. 



-19- 



Budgetary Accounting 

An annual budget is legally adopted for the General Fund. All financial orders are initiated or 
recommended at Town meetings. Expenditures are limited to the line items as voted at the Town 
meetings. Department heads may not transfer, without approval, appropriation balances from one 
expenditure account to another within their department or budget. These along with transfers or 
unencumbered appropriation balances between departments or agencies must be approved at Town 
Meetings. 

Long-term Debt 

State law permits the town to authorize indebtedness up to a limit of 5% of its equalized valuation. 
Debt issued in accordance with this state law is designated as being inside the debt limit. In 
addition, however, a town may authorize debt in excess of that limit for specific purposes. Such debt 
when issued is designated as being outside the debt limit. The following summarized the annual 
debt service requirements as of June 30, 2012. 



General Obligation Bonds 



Principal 



Interest 



Total 



Outstanding June 30, 2011 

Retirements 

Additions 

Outstanding June 30, 2012 



4,540,000 
320,000 
44.190,000 



$ 48,410,000 



$ 1,413,635 

$ 238,465 

$ 22.003.577 

$ 23,178,747 



5,953,635 
558,465 
66,193,577 



$ 71,588,747 





Pop Warner Cheerleading Teams A and B and the C Football Team 
were recognized by the Board of Selectmen for their achievements during 2012 




TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES 
IN FUND BALANCES - ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES 
AND EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2012 











Fiduciary 












Fund Types 


Total 










Expendable 


(Memorandum 




General 


Special Revenue 


Capital Projects 


Trust 


Only) 


REVENUES: 












General Property Taxes 


56,803,576.09 


0.00 






56,803,576.09 


Tax Liens 


ICO QOQ AO 


OOI Q AA 1 C 

zoi,eyu. ib 






OAK Q7ft O A 


Special Assessments 


SO fi70 OO 


A K A 7 1 1 A 

40,4 / 1. 1U 






AQ tZ AO QO 

yo,o4o.y^; 


Excise 


O 1 QQ Q07 CI 

o, loo,oo /.O 1 


A AA 

u.uu 






O lOO 007 K1 

o,loo,oo/.ol 


Penalties 


1 1 A i". I 1 CO 

4 1U,541.DZ 


A AA 

u.uu 






A "\ l\ K A ~\ RO 
41U,041.5J 


Licenses and Permits 


/U /,ol l.oo 


n nn 

u.uu 




AC C A1 A A 

4b,o4 / .40 


H R A /IRAOO 

/o4,4oy.Jo 


Intergovernmental 


1 uax. qk.9 nn 


A OQC C W - 1 O 

4,zyo, yoo. iz 




1 n7R eo 
1,U / O.OiS 


17 ICQ QQO Q/j 


Charges for Services 


Q 1 OQQ QC 


/, iyy,b /u. io 




Q7Q Jy|E AO 

o /y,44o.yo 


1A 7CK ^ AQ lO 

1U, /b5,4Uy. li 


Fines 


1 OO 07ft Art 

ioz,z /y.uu 


A AA 

U.UU 






1 OO OTO A A 


Fees 


O A AAO A Q 

o4,yUo.4o 


0.00 






O A AAO A O 

34,908.48 


Interest Earnings 


OA1 OOI AK 

JUl,ool.4o 


O "lO OR 

z,biy.oo 




(?(? OCR OC 

00,000. 8b 


OCA 017 1£? 

259,81 /.lb 


Appropriation Refunds 


OAO Af\H A1 

202,407.91 


0.00 






202,407.91 


Gifts 


0.00 


i no 7on co 
lUo, / ZU.bZ 




O ROE K^C Ert 

o,o^o,Obo.o2 


O CO A OOC 1 A 

3,bJ4,2ob.l4 


Bond Proceeds 


n nn 
u.uu 


O Q 1 A 1 C A OA 

Z,olU, luU.oU 


a a i on finn nn 
44, iyu,uuu.uu 




A*7 Mllll 1 CA QA 

4 / ,UUU, IbU.oU 


Miscellaneous 


1 ( U ti ■ QR1 OA 


007 QQO 70 


1 OAO 1 9 AA 


K/*Q RAO RO 

04o,OUo.oa 


j| CCE OA K 1 

4,bb&,4oy.Ol 


Other 


0.00 


i 1 i AC 1 O 1 

1 14,yb / .1 1 






1 1 A AC7 O 1 

1 14,9b / .21 


Total Revenues 


79,897,752.00 


15,038,457.27 


46,082,137.00 


4,556,609.06 


145,574,955.33 














General Government 


1,880,125.33 


145,618.43 




3,609,532.96 


5,635,276.72 


rublic barety 


O A AC 07K RO 

o,44b,o7o.5a 


O 1 A 007 CC 

olU,oo /.bb 




O A 7 1 A A AC 

<j47,4U9.9b 


A 1AJ COO IE 

9,104,623.15 


Human Services 


1 007 C\C\A 7tt 

1,ZZ /,UU4. /o 


1 AA R 1 A A A 

iuy,oi4.uu 




1 Q 7Q7 1 Q 

lo, / o / . iy 


1 OKAOKKQ r 7 


Public Works 


K. QOQ 77Q G7 


O CKQ C.KO QO 


4b, Z / o.UU 


AAA. AA 

yuu.uu 


Q AOQ ril 1 7Q 

y,u^y,bU4. /y 


Community Development 


7AO R/JQ CQ 

/ uz,obo.by 


co coc en 
b^,bob.bU 






7ce O^n OQ 

rbD.^OU.Zy 


Building Maintenance 


i QQC 7AA ftfi 
4,ooO, /UU.oD 


u.uu 




CQ OQO RE 


A AKZ. QQQ A 1 

4,4oo,yoo.4i 


Education 


QK. HOO f.w~. HQ 


A Q7Q /I QO 7 /I 

4,y /y,4oz. * 4 


o,yy /,oou.by 


Q7fl ^nCJ QR. 


A A 077 (tQyl 07 

44, o / /,Do4.o / 


Recreation 


121,228.98 


700,441.29 






821,670.27 


Veterans' Services 


372,592.37 


1,000.00 






373,592.37 


Debt and Interest 


p.np. 1 kk. no 

DUO, 1DO.UU 


n nn 
u.uu 






CAC 1 CR A A 

bUo, 1O0.UU 


Unclassified 


1,436,431.45 


16,548.17 




10,099,785.02 


11,552,764.64 


Statutory Charges 


7,050,705.00 


0.00 






7,050,705.00 


Capital Outlay 


1,334,645.14 


1,159,353.12 






2,493,998.26 


Warrant Articles 


1917 iq« nn 


0.00 


00 






Total Expenditures 


69,132,800.19 


11,139,084.83 


4,043,833.69 


14,519,103.53 


98,834,822.24 


Excess (deficiency) of 












Revenues over Expenditures 


10,764,951.81 


3,899,372.44 


42,038,303.31 


(9,962,494.47) 


46,740,133.09 


OTHER FINANCIAL SOURCES (1ISF.S1 












Proceeds of General Obligation Bonds 




0.00 






0.00 


Operating Transfers In 


1,014,642.97 


(17,856.27) 




10,099,785.02 


11,096,571.72 


Operating Transfers Out 


(10,099,785.02) 


(976,786.70) 




(20,000.00) 


(11,096,571.72) 


State and County Charges 










0.00 


Total Other Financing Sources (Uses) 

Excess/Deficiency of Revenues 
and Other Financing Sources 
over Expenditures and Other Uses 

Fund Balance July 1, 2011 

Decrease in Provision for 
Abatements and Exemptions 

Fund Balance June 30, 2012 


(9,085,142.05) 


(994,642.97) 


0.00 


10,079,785.02 


0.00 


1,679,809.76 


2,904,729.47 


42,038,303.31 


117,290.55 


46,740,133.09 


11,853,636.77 

378,474.41 
13,911,920.94 


8,742,841.34 
11,647,570.81 


1,255,610.11 
43,293,913.42 


3,109,039.79 
3,226,330.34 


24,961,128.01 

378,474.41 
72,079.735.51 



-21- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET - SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2012 



Assets 



Grants 



Reserved for 
Gifts Appropriation Revolving 



Water 



Total 
(Memorandum 
Only) 



Cash 

Receivables: 

General Property Taxes 

Less: Prov for Abates & Exemptions 

Tax Liens 

Tax Foreclosures 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Departmental 

Betterments 

User Charges 
Due from Other Gov'ts 
Amounts to be provided for: 

Retirement of Long Term Debt 



4,566,230.01 264,425.21 



477,783.94 2,454,851.23 4,233,232.91 11,996,523.30 



9,898.50 



299,717.20 



299,717.20 
9,898.50 



Total Assets 



4,576,128.51 264,425.21 



477,783.94 2,454,851.23 4,532,950.11 12,306,139.00 



Liabilities & Fund Balance 



Liabilities: 

Warrants Payable 

Deferred Revenue: 
General Property Taxes 
Other Accounts Receivable 

Notes Payable 

Payroll Withholdings Payable 
Incurred Costs 



138,760.06 1,050.00 



9,898.50 



87,114.47 122,027.96 



299,717.20 



348,952.49 



309,615.70 



Total Liabilities 



148,658.56 1,050.00 



0.00 87,114.47 421,745.16 



658,568.19 



Fund Balance: 
Res. For Encumbrances 
Res. For Special Purpose 
Res. For Special Purpose Water 
Res. For Subsequent Years 
Unreserved-Undesignated 



1,286,206.53 1,286,206.53 

4,427,469.95 263,375.21 367,783.94 2,367,736.76 928,688.78 8,355,054.64 

951,175.64 951,175.64 



110,000.00 



945,134.00 1,055,134.00 



Total Fund Balance 



4,427,469.95 263,375.21 477,783.94 2,367,736.76 4,111,204.95 11,647,570.81 



Total Liabilities & Fund Balance 4,576,128.51 264,425.21 477,783.94 2,454,851.23 4,532,950.11 12,306,139.00 



-22- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES 
IN FUND BALANCES - SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 





FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2012 












l> , .... -1 - 

Keserved tor 


Revolving 








vjraiiLs 


(lift-* 






Water 


Total 


REVENUES: 














General Property Taxes 












0.00 


Tax Liens 










231,890.16 


231,890.16 


Special Assessments 








/(7I 1 A 




45,471.10 


Excise 












0.00 


Ppnn It" ip(; 












0.00 


Licenses and Permits 












0.00 


Intergovernmental 








999 007 J^Q, 




4,296,965.12 


Charges for Services 








Q Old 1 7°. Af\ 


3,923,496.73 


7,199,670.13 


Fines 












0.00 


Fees 












0.00 


Interest Earnings 




4oo.y4 


1 CEO QC 




245.36 


2,619.85 


Appropriation Refunds 












0.00 


Gifts 




07 QIC AO 




70 AftA dA 




108,720.62 


Bond Proceeds 












2,810,160.30 


Miscellaneous 










227,992.78 


227,992.78 


Other 


0,0 1 I .UU 




QQ Ell OA 


OO,o40.U 1 




114,967.21 


L Utal 1VCVC11UCB 


6,894,214.42 


OO O C 1 AO 

38,351.92 


41,164.16 


O />0 1 1/11 rr ,* 

3, bol, 101.74 


4,383,625.03 


15,038,457.27 


EXPENDITURES: 














General Government 








90 07d fi'i 




145,618.43 


Public Safety 


288,993.27 


O 1 1 \~~ l\ OA 

21,079.39 




f?£ K A A 




310,837.66 


Human Services 


63,630.98 


11,942.26 




33,940.76 




109,514.00 


Public Works 


731,967.30 




900.00 


8,144.39 


2,912,641.13 


3,653,652.82 


Community Development 


57,816.60 


4,220.00 




650.00 




62,686.60 


Building Maintenance 












0.00 


Education 


2,197,563.75 






2,781,868.99 




4,979,432.74 


Recreation 








700,441.29 




700,441.29 


Veterans' Services 




1,000.00 








1 AAA AA 

1,000.00 


Debt and Interest 












0.00 


Unclassified 


16,548.17 










1 £ RAO in 

lb, 548. 1 / 


Statutory Charges 












0.00 


Capital Outlay 










1,159,353.12 


1,159,353.12 


Warrant Articles 












0.00 


Total Expenditures 


3,482,063.85 


38,241.65 


900.00 


3,545,885.08 


4,071,994.25 


11,139,084.83 


Excess (deficiency) of 














Revenues over Expenditures 


3,412,150.57 


110.27 


40,264.16 


135,216.66 


311,630.78 


3,899,372.44 


OTHER FINANCIAL SOURCES (USES) 












Proceeds of General Obligation Bonds 










0.00 


Operating Transfers In 


50,000.00 






(67,856.27) 




(17,856.27) 


Operating Transfers Out 


67,856.27 


(64,732.97) 


(20,000.00) 


(50,000.00) 


(909,910.00) 


(976,786.70) 


State and County Charges 














Total Other Financing Sources (Uses) 


117,856.27 


(64,732.97) 


(20,000.00) 


(117,856.27) 


(909,910.00) 


(994,642.97) 


Excess/Deficiency of Revenues 














and Other Financing Sources 














over Expenditures and Other Uses 


3,530,006.84 


(64,622.70) 


20,264.16 


17,360.39 


(598,279.22) 


2,904,729.47 


Fund Balance July 1, 2011 


897,463.11 


327,997.91 


457,519.78 


2,350,376.37 


4,709,484.17 


8,742,841.34 



Increase in Provision for 
Abatements and Exemptions 



Fund Balance June 30, 2012 4,427,469.95 263,375.21 477,783.94 2,367,736.76 4,111,204.95 11,647,570.81 



-23- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURES 



FUNCTION/ACTIVITY 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 
Selectmen 
Selectmen 


FOR THE FISCAL YEAR END JUNE 30, 2012 

C. FWD TO FY TRANSFER & 

12 APPROPRIATION EXPENDITURES 
FROM FY 11 FISCAL 2012 FISCAL 2012 

Stipend 0.00 4,620.00 4,620.00 
Expenses 0.00 14.800.00 14.057.91 


C.FWD TO 13 
FROM FY 12 

0.00 
476.65 


CLOSE 
FISCAL 
2012 

0.00 
265.44 






0.00 


19,420.00 


18,677.91 


476.65 


265.44 


Elections 
l'j luct ions 
Elections 


Salaries 

Constable 

Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


25,623.00 
175.00 
13.390.00 


21,424.86 
175.00 
13.036.92 


0.00 
0.00 
353.08 


4,198.14 
0.00 
0.00 




0.00 


39,188.00 


34,636.78 


353.08 


4,198.14 


Registrars 
Registrars 


Salaries 
Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 


1,875.00 
6.450.00 


1,875.00 
6.450.00 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 


8,325.00 


8,325.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Finance Committee 
Finance Committee 


Salaries 
Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 


1,400.00 
8.500.00 


1,119.37 
7.786.96 


0.00 
0.00 


280.63 
713.04 




0.00 


9,900.00 


8,906.33 


0.00 


993.67 


Town Manager 
Town Manager 
Town Manager 
Town Manager 


Salary - Town Manager 
Salaries - Other 
Expenses 
Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 
0.00 
1,500.00 
0.00 


140,538.58 
274,300.29 
70,300.00 
1.400.00 


140,538.58 
274,300.29 
63,347.31 
902.35 


0.00 
0.00 
415.25 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 
8,037.44 
497.65 


1,500.00 


486,538.87 


479,088.53 


415.25 


8,535.09 


Town Accountant 
Town Accountant 
Town Accountant 
Town Accountant 


Salary - Town Accountant 
Salaries - Other 
Expenses 
Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 
0.00 
7,000.00 
0.00 


104,666.55 
236,484.66 
2,315.00 
245.00 


104,666.55 
236,484.66 
2,522.52 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 

6,784.75 
245.00 


0.00 
0.00 
7.73 
0.00 




7,000.00 


343,711.21 


343,673.73 


7,029.75 


7.73 


Treasurer/Collector 
Treasurer/Collector 
Treasurer/Collector 
Treasurer/Collector 
Treasurer/Collector 


Salary - Treas./Collector 

Salaries - Other 

Expenses 

Furnish & Equip. 

Amt. Cert. Coll. Tax Title 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
1.166.40 
1,166.40 


84,964.61 
141,774.00 

19,482.00 
125.00 

15.000.00 
261,345.61 


84,964.61 
141,596.68 
18,999.44 
125.00 
2.479.78 
248,165.51 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
13.686.62 
13,686.62 


0.00 
177.32 
482.56 
0.00 
0.00 
659.88 


Town Clerk 
Town Clerk 
Town Clerk 


Salary - Town Clerk 
Salaries - Other 
Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


75,904.02 
99,176.08 
3.350.00 


75,904.02 . 
99,176.08 
3.252.18 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 
97.82 




0.00 


178,430.10 


178,332.28 


0.00 


97.82 


Assessors 
Assessors 
Assessors 
Assessors 


Salary - Principal Assessor 
Salaries - Other 
Expenses 
Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 
0.00 
47,493.66 
0.00 


101,494.00 
93,334.23 
161,600.00 
2.300.00 


96,873.69 
93,334.23 
145,677.55 
2.298.84 


0.00 
0.00 

00 


4,620.31 

0.00 

lfi 999 79 
i i > tt. 

1.16 




47,493.66 


358,728.23 


338,184.31 


48,193.39 


19,844.19 


Town Counsel 
Town Counsel 


Contractual Services 
Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 


221,000.00 
5.500.00 


216,750.00 
5.384.96 


0.00 
0.00 


4,250.00 
115.05 




0.00 


226,500.00 


222,134.95 


0.00 


4,365.05 


Permanent Bid Committee 
Permanent Bid Committee 


Salaries 
Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 


450.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


450.00 
0.00 


0.00 


450.00 


0.00 


0.00 


450.00 


General Government Subtotal 




57,160.06 


1,932,537.02 


1,880,125.33 


70,154.74 


39,417.01 



-24- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURES 





FOR THE FISCAL YEAR END JUNE 30, 2012 










C. FWD TO FY 


TRANSFER & 






CLOSE 






12 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 


C.FWD TO 13 


FISCAL 


FUNCTION/ACTIVITY 




FROM FY 11 


FISCAL 2012 


FISCAL 2012 


FROM FY 12 


2012 


PUBLIC SAFETY: 














Police 


Salary - Chief 


0.00 


111,860.00 


111,859.80 


0.00 


0.20 


Police 


Salary - Deputy Chief 


0.00 


98,470.32 


98,470.32 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Salary - Lieutenant 


0.00 


322,267.86 


322,267.86 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Salary - Sergeants 


n on 




004,00 t .Oo 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Salary - Patrolmen 


36,646.24 


1,894,609.00 


1,921,721.60 


0.00 


Q KQ-J fi4 


Police 


Salary - Clerical 


0.00 


85,817.11 


85,817.11 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Salary - Fill In Costs 


8,765.51 


480,465.88 


489,231.39 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Salary - Paid Holidays 


0.00 


80,000.00 


73,893.25 


0.00 


6,106.75 


Police 


Salary - Specialist 


0.00 


12,350.00 


11,200.00 


0.00 


1,150.00 


Police 


Salary - Incentive 


0.00 


506,608.05 


506,608.05 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Salary - Night Differential 


0.00 


45,864.00 


42,296.40 


0.00 


3,567.60 


Police 


Sick Leave Buyback 


0.00 


ry{\ /yan i\f\ 


JO, boy. 1 / 


0.00 


7.83 


Police 


Expenses 


1 T} 1 } AH 




OOO OQO OR 

ZZZ,OoZ.OD 


o,4U / .OU 


10,ooZ.ol 




T^n*"niQn nr Rnntn 
r UIlllsll I <i.|u 1 1-> 


0.00 




9 1 100 00 


0.00 


0.00 




52,735.21 


4,318,985.80 


4,332,064.88 


3,407.50 


36,248.63 


Fire 


Salary - Chief 


0.00 


115,297.79 


115,297.79 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire 


Salary - Deputy Chief 


0.00 


126,436.77 


126,436.77 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire 


Salary - Lieutenant 


0.00 


453,086.00 


453,086.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire 


Salary - Privates 


0.00 


1,871,468.00 


1,868,255.73 


0.00 


3,212.27 


Fire 


Salary - Clerk 


0.00 


52,671.36 


52,671.36 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire 


Salary - Part Time 


0.00 


18,655.00 


16,085.85 


0.00 


2,569.15 


Fire 


Salary - Overtime Costs 


0.00 


600,000.00 


595,635.33 


0.00 


4,364.67 


Fire 


Salary - Paid Holidays 


0.00 


134,574.20 


134,574.20 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire 


Salary - Incentive/EMT 


0.00 


14,350.00 


14,350.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire 


Sick Leave Buyback 


0.00 


28,878.00 


25,425.37 


0.00 


3,452.63 


Fire 


Expenses 


30.99 


121,325.00 


117,426.06 


0.00 


3,929.93 


Fire 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


18.000.00 


18.000.00 


0.00 


0.00 




30.99 


3,554,742.12 


3,537,244.46 


0.00 


17,528.65 


Public Safety Central Disp. 


Salaries Full Time 


0.00 


476,535.00 


447,763.27 


0.00 


28,771.73 


Public Safety Central Disp. 


Salaries Overtime 


0.00 


48,000.00 


58,962.62 


0.00 


(10,962.62) 


Public Safety Central Disp. 


Salaries Part Time 


0.00 


0.00 


1,551.02 


0.00 


(1,551.02) 


Public Safety Central Disp. 


Expenses 


561.75 


31,750.00 


21,429.14 


329.00 


10,553.61 


Pubbc Safety Central Disp. 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


5.000.00 


4.138.50 


0.00 


861.50 


561.75 


561,285.00 


533,844.55 


329.00 


27,673.20 


Animal Control 


Salaries 


0.00 


39,486.69 


39,486.69 


0.00 


0.00 


Animal Control 


Expenses 


0.00 


3.825.00 


3,734.95 


0.00 


90.05 




0.00 


43,311.69 


43.221.64 


0.00 


90.05 


Public Safety Subtotal 




53,327.95 


8,478,324.61 


8,446,375.53 


3,736.50 


81,540.53 


PUBLIC WORKS: 














Engineering Division 


St a 1 ci vm a a 
' 'ii la I lea 


0.00 


?30 507 59 


91ft 507 52 


0.00 


0.00 


rincn nppt*i no OiviQinn 


Snl«**ipQ Port TSmp 


0.00 


1 2 990 00 


8 544 00 


0.00 


3 67(5 no 


Engineering Division 




0.00 


1 4 Ron on 




0.00 


378.05 


0.00 


257,227.52 


253,173.47 


0.00 


A 054 05 


Highway Division 


Salary - D.P.W. Supt. 


0.00 


106,274.50 


106,274.50 


0.00 


0.00 


Highway Division 


Salaries - Other 


0.00 


1,257,993.00 


1,248,889.50 


0.00 


9,103.50 


Highway Division 


Stream Maint. Sal. 


0.00 


13,600.00 


8,310.60 


0.00 


5,289.40 


Highway Division 


Stream Maint. Exp. 


0.00 


1,000.00 


788.88 


0.00 


211.12 


Highway Division 


Expenses 


0.00 


329,990.00 


302,172.01 


0.00 


27,817.99 


Highway Division 


Road Machinery Exp. 


0.00 


80,000.00 


79,081.80 


0.00 


918.20 


Highway Division 


Fuel & Other 


0.00 


372,699.00 


372,699.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Highway Division 


Drainage Projects 


0.00 


56,569.86 


56,544.12 


0.00 


25.74 


Highway Division 


Public Street Lights 


0.00 


190,000.00 


175,316.68 


0.00 


14,683.32 


Highway Division 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


37.990.00 


37.609.52 


0.00 


380.48 


0.00 


2,446,116.36 


2,387,686.61 


0.00 


58,429.75 



-25- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURES 





FOR THE FISCAL YEAR END JUNE 30, 2012 










C. FWD TO FY 


TRANSFER & 






CLOSE 










CiAriMNlJl l uriUjo 


C.FWDTO 13 


FISCAL 


FUNCTION/ACTIVITY 




FROM FY 11 


FISCAL 2012 


FISCAL 2012 


FROM FY 12 


2012 


Snow & Ice Control 


Salaries 


0.00 


89,350.00 


89,209.33 


0.00 


140.67 


Snow & Ice Control 


Fxpenses 


0.00 


214.140.00 


199.848.96 


0.00 


14.291.04 




0.00 


303,490.00 


289 058 29 


0.00 


14,431.71 


Highway Division 


Rubbish Collection 


41.514.81 


1.506.511.00 


1.468.740.80 


79.285.01 


0.00 




41,514.81 


1,506,51 1.00 


1,468,740.80 


79,285.01 


0.00 


Tree Division 


Salaries 


0.00 


170,057.00 


163,778.45 


0.00 


6,278.55 


Tree Division 


Expenses 


0.00 


11.500.00 


9.147.70 


0.00 


2.352.30 




0.00 


181,557.00 


172,926.15 


0.00 


8,630.85 


Parks & Grounds Division 


Salaries 


0.00 


347 185 57 


347 185 57 


0.00 


0.00 


Parks & Grounds Division 


Expenses 


0.00 


125.060.00 


122.749.21 


0.00 


2.310.79 




0.00 


472,245.57 


469,934.78 


0.00 


2,310.79 


Cemetery Division 


Salaries 


0.00 


150,756.10 


150,756.10 


0.00 


0.00 


Cemetery Division 


Expenses 


0.00 


17.750.00 


13.555.23 


0.00 


4.194.77 


0.00 


168,506.10 


164,311.33 


0.00 


4,194.77 


Sewer 


Salaries 


0.00 


70 aco is 


71 269 19 


0.00 


1,593.16 


Sewer 


Expenses 


27.384.03 


59,120.00 


51.678.35 


32.222.14 


2.603.54 


Sewer Subtotal 




27.384.03 


131.982.35 


122.947.54 


32.222.14 


4.196.70 


Total Public Works 




68,898.84 


5 467 635 90 


5,328,778.97 


111,507.15 


96,248.62 


COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT: 












Board of Health 


Salary - Director 


0.00 


75,642.44 


75,642.44 


0.00 


0.00 


Board of Health 


Salaries - Other 


0.00 


113,157.00 


108,370.00 


0.00 


4,787.00 


Board of Health 


Expenses 


0.00 


9,575.00 


9,323.54 


0.00 


251.46 


Board of Health 


Mental Health 


0.00 


35 000.00 


34,999.33 


0.00 


0.67 


Board of Health 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 




0.00 


233,374.44 


228,335.31 


0.00 


5,039.13 


Sealer/Weights & Measures 


Inspectional Services 


0.00 


5,000.00 


5.000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Planning/Conservation 


Salary - Director 


0.00 


81 947 ^7 


81 947 37 


0.00 


0.00 


Planning/Conservation 


Salaries - Other 


0.00 


204,748.00 


201,969.03 


0.00 


2,778.97 


Planning/Conservation 


Expenses 


0.00 


10,175.00 


4,244.37 


0.00 


5,930.63 


Planning/Conservation 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


500.00 


500.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


297,370.37 


288,660.77 


0.00 


8,709.60 


Building Inspector 


Salary - Bldg Inspector 


0.00 


73,693.35 


73,693.35 


0.00 


0.00 


Building Inspector 


Salaries • Other 


0.00 


107,097.46 


102,978.11 


0.00 


4,119.35 


Building Inspector 


Expenses 


0.00 


4,250.00 


3,896.15 


0.00 


353.85 


Building Inspector 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


185.040.81 


180.567.61 


0.00 


4.473.20 


Community Development Subtotal 


0.00 


720,785.62 


702,563.69 


0.00 


18,221.93 


PUBLIC BUILDINGS: 














Public Buildings 


Salary - Superintendent 


0.00 


92,468.57 


92,468.57 


0.00 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


Salaries - Other 


52,833.81 


2,402,099.62 


2,446,690.17 


0.00 


8,243.26 


Public Buildings 


Expenses - Town Bldgs. 


14,991.86 


190,000.00 


193,565.60 


2,425.02 


9,001.24 


Public Buildings 


Electric - Town Bldgs. 


0.00 


200,000.00 


177,080.51 


0.00 


22,919.49 


Public Buildings 


Utilities - Town Bldgs. 


0.00 


110,000.00 


106,549.21 


2,688.17 


762.62 


Public Buildings 


Expenses - School Bldgs. 


169.56 


220,000.00 


218,998.65 


0.00 


1,170.91 


Public Buildings 


Training & Conference 


0.00 


400.00 


290.42 


0.00 


109.58 


Public Buildings 


Fuel Heating 


0.00 


1,047,000.00 


1,047,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


Asbestos Repair 


0.00 


10,000.00 


10,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


Roof Repairs 


24,732.75 


25,000.00 


20,485.39 


29,247.36 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


HVAC Repairs 


0.00 


75.000.00 


73.572.34 


0.00 


1.427.66 


92.727.98 


4.371.968.19 


4.386.700.86 


34.360.55 


43.634.76 


Public Buildings Subtotal 




92,727.98 


4,371,968.19 


4,386,700.86 


34,360.55 


43,634.76 



-26- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURES 





FOR THE FISCAL YEAR END JUNE 30 


2012 










O. r WD lOri 


rii i , a MODinn O 

IKANothK & 






CLOSE 






12 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 


C.FWD TO 13 


FISCAL 


FUNCTION/ACTIVITY 




FROM FY 1 1 


FISCAL 2012 


FISCAL 2012 


FROM FY 12 


2012 


HUMAN SERVICES: 














Veterans' Services 


Salary 


0.00 


58,937.07 


58,937.07 


0.00 


0.00 


Veterans' Services 


Expenses 


0.00 


1,800.00 


1,706.67 


0.00 


93.33 


Veterans' Services 


Assistance 


11.395.04 


306.000.00 


311.948.63 


0.00 


5.446.41 






11,395.04 


366,737.07 


372,592.37 


0.00 


5,539.74 


Library 


Salary - Director 


0.00 


84,747.22 


84,747.22 


0.00 


0.00 


Library 


Salaries - Other 


0.00 


719,335.37 


706,180.10 


0.00 


13,155.27 


Library 


Expenses 


0.00 


148,323.00 


148,291.68 


0.00 


31.32 


Library 


M.V.L.C. 


0.00 


33,195.00 


33,195.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Library 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


18.350.00 


18,350.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1,003,950.59 


990,764.00 


0.00 


13,186.59 


Recreation 


Salary - Director 


0.00 


68,864.85 


68,864.85 


0.00 


0.00 


Recreation 


Salaries - Other 


0.00 


47,175.22 


47,175.22 


0.00 


0.00 


Recreation 


Expenses 


0.00 


4,500.00 


4,488.91 


0.00 


11.09 


Recreation 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


700.00 


700.00 


0.00 


0.00 




0.00 


121,240.07 


121,228.98 


0.00 


11.09 


Elderly Services 


Salary - Director 


0.00 


66,969.46 


66,969.46 


0.00 


0.00 


Elderly Services 


Salaries - Other 


0.00 


106,253.00 


105,235.25 


0.00 


1,017.75 


Elderly Services 


Expenses 


0.00 


40,670.00 


39,148.28 


0.00 


1,521.72 


Elderly Services 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


150.00 


150.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


214,042.46 


211,502.99 


0.00 


2,539.47 


Historical Committee 


Salaries 


0.00 


21,542.00 


18,526.36 


0.00 


3 1 5 64 


Historical Committee 


Expenses 


1.648.50 


6.750.00 


6.211.43 


1.700.00 


487.07 




1.648.50 


28.292.00 


24.737.79 


1.700.00 


3.502.71 


Human Services Subtotal 




13,043.54 


1,734,262.19 


1,720,826.13 


1,700.00 


24,779.60 


EDUCATION: 














School Department 


Salaries 


0.00 


24,313,500.00 


24,330,306.71 


0.00 


(16,806.71) 


School Department 


Expenses 


879.586.04 


7.154.000.00 


7.476.683.42 


540.095.91 


16.806.71 






879,586.04 


31,467,500.00 


31,806,990.13 


540,095.91 


(0.00) 


Regional Vocational 


Shawsheen Vocational 


0.00 


3.215.095.00 


3.215.094.96 


0.00 


0.04 




0.00 


3.215.095.00 


3.215.094.96 


0.00 


0.04 


Education Subtotal 




879,586.04 


34,682,595.00 


35,022,085.09 


540,095.91 


0.04 


DEBT SERVICE: 














Debt & Interest 


Schools 


0.00 


113,213.00 


113,212.50 


0.00 


0.50 


Debt & Interest 


Gen. Government 


0.00 


152,175.00 


152,175.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Debt & Interest 


Sewer 


0.00 


176,198.00 


176,197.50 


0.00 


0.50 


Debt & Interest 


Water 


0.00 


163,080.00 


163,080.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Debt & Interest 


Auth. Fees & Misc. 


0.00 


20.000.00 


1.500.00 


0.00 


18.500.00 






0.00 


624.666.00 


606.165.00 


0.00 


18.501.00 


Debt & Interest Subtotal 




0.00 


624,666.00 


606,165.00 


0.00 


18,501.00 


Insurance & Bonds 




0.00 


505,600.00 


501,309.73 


4,290.27 


0.00 


Employee Health & Life Insurance 


0.00 


2,274.03 


0.00 


2,274.03 


0.00 


Employ. Retire. Unused Sick Leave 


0.00 


61,264.00 


61,263.70 


0.00 


0.30 


Medicare Employers' Contr. 




0.00 


562,500.00 


556,548.87 


0.00 


5,951.13 


Salary Adj. & Add. Costs 




275,423.57 


(116,956.67) 


17,604.63 


140,862.27 


0.00 


Local Trans/Training Conf. 




0.00 


5,000.00 


2,258.53 


0.00 


2,741.47 


Out of State Travel 




0.00 


1,500.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1,500.00 


Computer Hdwe/Sftwe Maint. & Expenses 


99,604.21 


90,000.00 


155,941.92 


33,662.29 


0.00 


Annual Audit 




0.00 


30,000.00 


30,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Ambulance Billing 




0.00 


27,000.00 


25,455.15 


0.00 


1,544.85 



-27- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR END JUNE 30, 2012 



FUNCTION/ACTIVITY 
Town Report 

Professional & Technical Serv ices 
Reserve Fund 
Unclassified Subtotal 



C. FWD TO FY 
12 

FROM FY 1 1 
0.00 
174,594.10 
0.00 
549,621.88 



TRANSFER & 
APPROPRIATION 
FISCAL 2012 
10,000.00 
110,000.00 

0.00 

1,288,181.36 



EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL 2012 

8,372.00 
77,676.92 

0.00 

1,436,431.45 



C.FWDTO 13 
FROM FY 12 

0.00 
206,917.18 

0.00 

388,006.04 



CLOSE 
FISCAL 
2U12 
1,628.00 
0.00 
0.00 
13,365.75 



Current Year Overlay 


0.00 


700,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


700,000.00 


Retirement Contributions 


0.00 


4,195,687.00 


4,202,064.00 


0.00 


(6,377.00) 


Offset Items 


0.00 


38,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


38,000.00 


Special Education 


0.00 


4,331.00 


6,040.00 


0.00 


(1,709.00) 


Mass Bay Trans Auth. 


0.00 


439,738.00 


449,384.00 


0.00 


(9,646.00) 


MAPC (Ch. 688 of 1963) 


0.00 


6,636.00 


6,807.00 


0.00 


(171.00) 


RMV Non-Renewal Surcharge 


0.00 


12,500.00 


6,260.00 


0.00 


6,240.00 


Metro Air Poll. Cont. Dist. 


0.00 


6,614.00 


7,006.00 


0.00 


(392.00) 


Mosquito Control Program 


0.00 


47,382.00 


47,873.00 


0.00 


(491.00) 


M.W.R.A. Sewer Assessment 


0.00 


2,034,161.00 


2,187,544.00 


0.00 


(153,383.00) 


Charter Schools 


0.00 


81,981.00 


83,640.00 


0.00 


(1,659.00) 


School Choice 


0.00 


22,600.00 


5,000.00 


0.00 


17,600.00 


Essex County Tech Institute 


0.00 


49.159.00 


49.087.00 


0.00 


72.00 


Statutory Charges Subtotal 


0.00 


7,638,789.00 


7,050,705.00 


0.00 


588,084.00 



Unclassified 


Memorial/Veterans' Day 


0.00 


6,000.00 


6,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Unclassified 


Lease of Quarters 


0.00 


1,500.00 


750.00 


0.00 


750.00 


Unclassified 


First Baptist Church Land 


0.00 


15,000.00 


15,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Unclassified 


9 Cross Street 


0.00 


1,182,500.00 


1,182,348.00 


0.00 


152.00 


Unclassified 


Storm Water Mgmt Plan 


13,649.90 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


13,649.90 


Unclassified 


Senior Tax Rebate Prog. 


2,246.94 


15,360.00 


13,300.00 


2,068.00 


2,238.94 


Unclassified 


Facility Needs Study-Town 


58.717.23 


0.00 


0.00 


58.717.23 


0.00 


Warrant Articles Subtotal 




74,614.07 


1,220,360.00 


1,217,398.00 


60,785.23 


16,790.84 



Police 


Cruisers 


0.00 


150,000.00 


148,357.45 


0.00 


1,642.55 


Fire 


Rapid Response Vehicle 


0.00 


220,000.00 


0.00 


220,000.00 


0.00 


Public Works 


Parks/Grds Sch Prop Imp 


0.00 


94,700.00 


94,619.76 


0.00 


80.24 


Public Works 


Const/Maint Vehicles 


0.00 


206,350.00 


204,172.44 


0.00 


2,177.56 


Public Works 


Pickup/One Ton Truck 


0.00 


33,600.00 


32,643.83 


0.00 


956.17 


Public Works 


Cemetery Expansion 


30,051.41 


0.00 


5,270.41 


24,781.00 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


Misc. Facility Improve. 


144,864.15 


200,000.00 


74,246.05 


270,618.10 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


Roof Repairs 


0.00 


290,000.00 


290,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


Library Window/Door Repl. 


0.00 


75,000.00 


6,968.07 


68,031.93 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


Vehicles 


0.00 


42,000.00 


41,544.00 


0.00 


456.00 


Public Buildings 


Library Ceiling/Lighting 


29,930.04 


30.04 


0.00 


0.00 


30.04 


Elderly Services 


Wheelchair Transport Van 


0.00 


51,525.00 


51,520.00 


0.00 


5.00 


School 


Roof Repairs 


0.00 


46,000.00 


46,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


School 


Vans 


0.00 


47,000.00 


45,602.00 


0.00 


1,398.00 


School 


Burner/Boiler Replacement 


0.00 


85,000.00 


6,303.60 


78,696.40 


0.00 


School 


Fire Alarm No. Inter. 


0.00 


155,000.00 


141,356.28 


569.17 


13,074.55 


School 


Fire Alarm Woburn Street 


0.00 


155.000.00 


146.041.25 


569.17 


8.389.58 


Capital Outlay Subtotal 
GRAND TOTAL 




204,845.60 


1 851 205.04 


1 334 645.14 


663 265.77 


28 209.69 


1,993,825.96 


70,011,309.93 


69,132,800.19 


1,873,611.89 


968,793.77 



-28- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
WATER DEPARTMENT 
ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2012 





Actual Fiscal 
2010 


Actual Fiscal 
2011 


Capital 
Projects 
2011 


Total 2011 


Actual Fiscal 
2012 


Capital 
Projects 
2012 


Total 2012 


Revenues: 
















Water Receivables Rates 


3,116,631.25 


3,638,134.79 


0.00 


3,638,134.79 


3,488,828.16 


0.00 


3,488,828.16 


Water Receivables Services 


7,524.93 


11,853.01 


0.00 


11,853.01 


19,734.66 


0.00 


19,734.66 


Water Receivables Industrial 


13,284.16 


50.00 


0.00 


50.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Water Receivables Connections 


31,189.50 


38,168.75 


0.00 


38,168.75 


9,674.00 


0.00 


9,674.00 


Water Receivables Fire Protection 


333,274.12 


338,468.06 


0.00 


338,468.06 


351,201.00 


0.00 


351,201.00 


Water Receivables Cross Connections 


30,084.25 


45,731.50 


0.00 


45,731.50 


52,533.91 


0.00 


52,533.91 


Water Liens 


163,216.12 


227,058.03 


0.00 


227,058.03 


231,890.16 


0.00 


231,890.16 


Miscellaneous 




11911 ftft 


0.00 


11 911 ftft 


99Q 7fi'5 1 4 


00 


99Q 7ft*? 1 4 


Total Revenue 


3,701,102.55 


4,310,675.94 


0.00 


4,310,675.94 


4,383,625.03 


0.00 


4,383,625.03 


Operating Costs 


3.123.195.57 


2.929.483.04 


1.117.069.81 


4.046.552.85 


3.820.645.57 


251.348.68 


4.071.994.25 


Total Operating Costs 




O QOQ AH'i (\A 


1 117 ftftQ 8 1 
1,11/ ,U03,0 1 






9^1 **4ft RA 
£iO 1 ,010.00 


A H71 QQd 9K 


Excess Revenues over Operating Costs 




1 'iS 1 1 Q9 *H | 


n 117 ofiq 8 i i 


oaA i 9'* OQ 


569 979 46 


(9R 1 ^48 fiftl 


Q1 1 fiQft 7C 
Ol l,UOU. IO 


Other Financial Sources (Uses) 
















Issuance of Bond Anticipation Notes 


100,000.00 






0.00 








Retirement of Bond Anticipation Notes 






(100,000.00) 


(100,000.00) 








Proceeds of General Obligation Bonds & Notes 






1,600,000.00 


1,600,000.00 








Operating Transfers 




87,661.18 




87,661.18 








Total Other Financial Sources/Uses 
















Transfer to General Fund for Debt Service, Employees 
Benefits and Allocated Charges 


711.053.00 


734.495.00 


0.00 


734.495.00 


909.910.00 


0.00 


909.910.00 


Excess of revenues and other sources over (under) 
expenditures and other uses 


(33,146.02) 


734,359.08 


382,930.19 


1,117,289.27 


(346,930.54) 


(251,348.68) 


(598,279.22) 


Total Fund Balance - Beginning 


3,625,340.92 


3,746,780.43 


(154,585.53) 


3,592,194.90 


4,481,139.51 


228,344.66 


4,709,484.17 


Total Fund Balance • Ending 


3,592,194.90 


4,481,139.51 


228,344.66 


4,709,484.17 


4,134,208.97 


(23,004.02) 


4,111,204.95 



-29- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINING STATEMENTS OF REVENUES, 
EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 
CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2012 









Aerial 


















Ladder 


Shawsheen 












Main 


Public 


Truck - 


School 




WHS 




Total 




Street 


Safety 


Fire 


Window 


Sewer 


Feasibility- 




(Memorandum 




Sewer 


Building 


Dept. 


Replacement 


Interceptor 


Study 


WHS Project 


Only) 


Town Meeting Dates 


4/22/89 


4/26/97 


5/2/09 


5/2/09 


5/2/09 


5/1/10 


12/10/11 




Initial Project Authorization 


747000 


7 986 000 


975,000 


715 000 


1,250,000 


1 125 000 


44,190,000 


56,988,000 


REVENUES: 


















Intergovernmental 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


379,754.00 


0.00 


425,708.00 


1,086,675.00 


1,892,137.00 


Miscellaneous 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Total Revenue 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


379,754.00 


0.00 


425,708.00 


1,086,675.00 


1,892,137.00 


EXPENDITURES: 


















Capital Outlay 


















Total Expenditures 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


776 441 1 fi 


46 971 00 


7fi4 4^fl ^4 


9 4fifi fifi7 no 


4 041 811 fiQ 


Excess of revenues over/under expenditures 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


(396,689.15) 


(46,273.00) 


(328,742.54) 


(1,379,992.00) 


(2,151,696.69) 


Other Financial Sources(Uses) 


















Issuance of Bond Anticipation Notes 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Retirement of Bond Anticipation Notes 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Proceeds of General Obligation Bonds & Notes 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


44,190,000.00 


44,190,000.00 


Operating Transfers 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Total Other Financial Sources/Uses 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


44,190,000.00 


44,190,000.00 


Excess of revenues and other sources over 


















(under) expenditures and other uses 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


(396.689.15) 


(46.273.00) 


(328.742.54) 


42.810.008.00 


42.038.303.31 


FUND BALANCE JULY 1, 2011 


56,000.60 


3,615.92 


59,406.79 


656,836.25 


78,582.03 


401,168.52 


0.00 


1,255,610.11 


FUND BALANCE JUNE 30, 2012 


56,000.60 


3 615.92 


59,406.79 


260 147.10 


32 309.03 


72.425.98 


42 810.008.00 


43,293 913.42 



Note: Total authorization for WHS project was $81,563,115 plus $1,125,000 Feasibility Study 



-30- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF LONG TERM DEBT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2012 



DESCRIPTION 



YEAR YEAR 



ORIGINAL PRINCIPAL 
PRINCIPAL OUTSTANDING 



BOND 



PRINCIPAL 
PRINCIPAL OUTSTANDING 



ISSUE DUE RATE AMOUNT JUNE 30, 2011 ADDITIONS RETIREMENTS JUNE 30, 2012 



INSIDE DEBT LIMIT 



Remodeling Shawsheen School 08/2010 08/2020 2.63 715,000 



715,000 



75,000 



640,000 



Equipment-Ladder Truck 



08/2010 08/2020 2.63 975,000 



975,000 



100,000 



875,000 



Sewer 



08/2010 08/2030 2.81 1.250.000 



1,250.000 



65,000 



1.185,000 



TOTAL INSIDE DEBT LIMIT 



2,940,000 2,940,000 



240,000 2,700,000 



OUTSIDE DEBT LIMIT 



Water 



08/2010 08/2030 2.81 1,600,000 



1,600,000 



80,000 



1,520,000 



High School Project 

TOTAL OUTSIDE DEBT 
LIMIT 



09/2012 03/2037 3.28 44,190,000 



45,790,000 



44.190.000 



1,600,000 44,190,000 



44,190,000 



80,000 45,710,000 



GRAND TOTAL 



48,730,000 



4,540,000 44,190,000 



320,000 48,410,000 




New Pumper awaits customization before delivery 



-31- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF EXPENDABLE AND NON-EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 
IN CUSTODY OF TOWN TREASURER FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2012 



Balance Ju 



Non-Expend 



S. Carter Common Fund 


200.00 


SDJ Carter Lecture Fund 


6,000.00 


Library Funds: 




Benjamin Buck 


500.00 


Burnap 


200.00 


Chester M. Clark 


500.00 


Charlotte C. Smith 


500.00 


Stanley Webber 


0.00 


Walker School Fund 


275.00 


Housing Partnership 


0.00 


Winifred Richardson Trust 


25,000.00 


Cemetery Funds 


816,914.67 


Biggar Scholarship 


25,000.00 


Scott D. Braciska Scholarship 


0.00 


Altman Fam Education Trust 


25,000.00 


Justin O'Neil Scholarship 


0.00 


Elderly Services 


0.00 


Carney-Veterans Fund 


0.00 


Loddy Weisberg & Lena Leiter Scholar 


0.00 


Town Scholarship Fund 


0.00 


WHS Scholarship Fund 


0.00 


Zeneca Settlement 


0.00 


Invest. Fund Conservation 


0.00 


Confined Space 


0.00 


Employee's Health & Life Insurance 


0.00 


Employer's Health & Life Insurance 


0.00 


Olin Chemical 


0.00 


Andover St. Traffic Lights 


0.00 


Tracy Circle 


0.00 


Barrows Aud. Renovation 


0.00 


Flex Spending Town & School 


0.00 


Ambulance 


0.00 


Middlesex Pines I & II 


0.00 


Adoption 


0.00 


193 Ballardvale 


0.00 


National Grid Transfer 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund Wildwood 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund Boutwell 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund Middle School 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund No Intermediate 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund West Intermediate 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund Woburn St 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund Shawsheen 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund Reserve 


0.00 


Tailings 


0.00 


Tax Title Recordings 


0.00 


Street Openings 


0.00 


Dog Licenses 


0.00 


Sporting Licenses 


0.00 


Firearms Permits 


0.00 


Outside Details: Police 


0.00 


Outside Details: Fire 


0.00 


Outside Details: Public Bldgs 


0.00 


Forfeiture Deposits 


0.00 


Performance Bonds 


0.00 


Meals Tax 


0.00 


GRAND TOTAL 


900,089.67 



30, 2011 

Investment 



Expendable 


Total 


Bequests 


Income 


1,383.69 


1,583.69 


0.00 


67.74 


3,266.88 


9,266.88 


0.00 


373.82 


15.28 


515.28 


0.00 


22.04 


22.45 


222.45 


0.00 


9.51 


107.05 


607.05 


0.00 


25.97 


267.04 


767.04 


0.00 


32.81 


2.63 


2.63 


0.00 


0.11 


1,492.60 


1,767.60 


0.00 


75.62 


116,211.88 


116,211.88 


0.00 


4,966.73 


0.00 


25,000.00 


0.00 


46.40 


40,000.43 


856,915.10 


25,900.00 


37,444.50 


9,066.53 


34,066.53 


0.00 


1,457.29 


22,078.72 


22,078.72 


0.00 


927.34 


970.93 


25,970.93 


0.00 


1,110.98 


6,021.77 


6,021.77 


0.00 


211.87 


51,082.46 


51,082.46 


16,940.00 


110.92 


24.32 


24.32 


0.00 


0.00 


125,010.00 


125,010.00 


50,000.00 


264.55 


11,945.11 


11,945.11 


3,367.00 


523.70 


73,159.32 


73,159.32 


40,997.00 


3,831.29 


5,930.61 


5,930.61 


0.00 


10.98 


564.44 


564.44 


0.00 


1.04 


410.21 


410.21 


0.00 


0.00 


467,432.93 


467,432.93 


3,108,268.43 


3,375.98 


371,181.38 


371,181.38 


0.00 


0.00 


55,562.86 


55,562.86 


0.00 


103.03 


17.62 


17.62 


0.00 


0.00 


5,861.36 


5,861.36 


0.00 


10.85 


972.07 


972.07 


0.00 


41.58 


1,665.84 


1,665.84 


153,341.72 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


7,414.29 


7,414.29 


0.00 


13.78 


413.96 


413.96 


0.00 


0.78 


1,441.03 


1,441.03 


0.00 


2.68 


20,000.00 


20,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


42,326.21 


42,094.81 


142,830.45 


301.97 


4,398.44 


4,413.40 


2,227.54 


0.00 


695.16 


697.65 


1,088.04 


0.00 


27,581.01 


27,683.60 


174,570.48 


0.00 


1,268.97 


1,279.87 


14,400.25 


0.00 


3,475.50 


3,495.23 


5,488.89 


0.00 


7,052.55 


6,726.25 


26,337.31 


0.00 


4,435.48 


4,704.51 


15,487.85 


0.00 


75,414.97 


75,552.97 


0.00 


0.00 


(16,825.67) 


(16,825.67) 


0.00 


0.00 


55.00 


55.00 


330.00 


0.00 


101,400.00 


101,400.00 


12,000.00 


0.00 


114,676.50 


114,676.50 


25,177.00 


0.00 


7,932.90 


7,932.90 


1,307.90 


0.00 


25,112.50 


25,112.50 


20,162.50 


0.00 


5,918.36 


5,918.36 


260,276.84 


0.00 


10,664.72 


10,664.72 


42,041.24 


0.00 


(5,091.50) 


(5,091.50) 


77,127.85 


0.00 


30,330.00 


30,330.00 


406.00 


0.00 


367,017.63 


367,017.63 


280,093.09 


0.00 


113.70 


113.70 


1.075.82 


0.00 


2,208,950.12 


3,109,039.79 


4,501,243.20 


55,365.86 



-32- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF EXPENDABLE AND NON-EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 
IN CUSTODY OF TOWN TREASURER FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2012 



Transfers 



S. Carter Common Fund 


0.00 


SDJ Carter Lecture Fund 


0.00 


Library Funds: 




Benjamin Buck 


0.00 


Burnap 


0.00 


Chester M. Clark 


0.00 


Charlotte C. Smith 


0.00 


Stanley Webber 


0.00 


Walker School Fund 


0.00 


Housing Partnership 


0.00 


Winifred Richardson Trust 


0.00 


Cemetery Funds 


(20,000.00) 


Biggar Scholarship 


0.00 


Scott D. Braciska Scholarship 


0.00 


Altman Fam Education Trust 


0.00 


Justin O'Neil Scholarship 


0.00 


Elderly Services 


0.00 


Carney- Veterans Fund 


0.00 


Loddy Weisberg & Lena Leiter Scholar 


0.00 


Town Scholarship Fund 


0.00 


WHS Scholarship Fund 


0.00 


Zeneca Settlement 


0.00 


Invest. Fund Conservation 


0.00 


Confined Space 


0.00 


Employee's Health & Life Insurance 


0.00 


Employer's Health & Life Insurance 


10,099,785.02 


Olin Chemical 


0.00 


Andover St. Traffic Lights 


0.00 


Tracy Circle 


0.00 


Barrows Aud. Renovation 


0.00 


Flex Spending Town & School 


0.00 


Ambulance 


0.00 


Middlesex Pines I & II 


0.00 


Adoption 


0.00 


193 Ballardvale 


0.00 


National Grid Transfer 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund 


0.00 


Stunpnt Aptivitv T^unH Wimwnon 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund Boutwell 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund Middle School 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund No Intermediate 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund West Intermediate 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund Woburn St 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund Shawsheen 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund Reserve 


0.00 


Tailings 


0.00 


Tax Title Recordings 


0.00 


Street Openings 


0.00 


Dog Licenses 


0.00 


Sporting Licenses 


0.00 


Firearms Permits 


0.00 


Outside Details: Police 


0.00 


Outside Details: Fire 


0.00 


Outside Details: Public Bldgs 


0.00 


Forfeiture Deposits 


0.00 


Performance Bonds 


0.00 


Meals Tax 


0.00 


GRAND TOTAL 


10,079,785.02 





Balance Ju 


ne 30, 2012 




Expenditures 


Non-Expend 


Expendable 


Total 


0.00 


200.00 


1,451.43 


1,651.43 


493.24 


6,000.00 


3,147.46 


9,147.46 


0.00 


500.00 


37.32 


537.32 


0.00 


200.00 


31.96 


231.96 


0.00 


500.00 


133.02 


633.02 


0.00 


500.00 


299.85 


799.85 


0.00 


0.00 


2.74 


2.74 


0.00 


275.00 


1,568.22 


1,843.22 


0.00 


0.00 


121,178.61 


121,178.61 


0.00 


25,000.00 


46.40 


25,046.40 


900.00 


841,914.67 


57,444.93 


899,359.60 


0.00 


25,000.00 


10,523.82 


35,523.82 


750.00 


0.00 


22,256.06 


22,256.06 


0.00 


25,000.00 


2,081.91 


27,081.91 


0.00 


0.00 


6,233.64 


6,233.64 


13,737.19 


0.00 


54,396.19 


54,396.19 


0.00 


0.00 


24.32 


24.32 


0.00 


0.00 


175,274.55 


175,274.55 


4,250.00 


0.00 


11,585.81 


11,585.81 


11,375.00 


0.00 


106,612.61 


106,612.61 


0.00 


0.00 


5,941.59 


5,941.59 


0.00 


0.00 


565.48 


565.48 


0.00 


0.00 


410.21 


410.21 


3,366,703.55 


0.00 


212,373.79 


212,373.79 


10,099,785.02 


0.00 


371,181.38 


371,181.38 


0.00 


0.00 


55,665.89 


55,665.89 


0.00 


0.00 


17.62 


17.62 


0.00 


0.00 


5,872.21 


5,872.21 


0.00 


0.00 


1,013.65 


1,013.65 


147,621.12 


0.00 


7,386.44 


7,386.44 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


7,428.07 


7,428.07 


0.00 


0.00 


414.74 


414.74 


0.00 


0.00 


1,443.71 


1,443.71 


0.00 


0.00 


20,000.00 


20,000.00 


130,813.96 


0.00 


54,413.27 


54,413.27 


491.20 


0.00 


6,149.74 


6,149.74 


272.07 


0.00 


1,513.62 


1,513.62 


178,405.40 


0.00 


23,848.68 


23,848.68 


13,380.64 


0.00 


2,299.48 


2,299.48 


4,573.03 


0.00 


4 41 1.09 


4 41 1.09 


24,039.58 


0.00 


9,023.98 


9,023.98 


13,377.85 


0.00 


6,814.51 


6,814.51 


0.00 


0.00 


75,552.97 


75,552.97 


165.81 


0.00 


(16,991.48) 


(16,991.48) 


1,800.00 


0.00 


(1,415.00) 


(1,415.00) 


3,000.00 


0.00 


110,400.00 


110,400.00 


0.00 


0.00 


139,853.50 


139,853.50 


975.75 


0.00 


8,265.05 


8,265.05 


43,375.00 


0.00 


1,900.00 


1,900.00 


262,005.00 


0.00 


4,190.20 


4,190.20 


42,029.96 


0.00 


10,676.00 


10,676.00 


69,232.55 


0.00 


2,803.80 


2,803.80 


0.00 


0.00 


30,736.00 


30,736.00 


84,523.49 


0.00 


562,587.23 


562,587.23 


1,027.12 


0.00 


162.40 


162.40 


14,519,103.53 


925,089.67 


2,301,240.67 


3,226,330.34 



-33- 



■ PUBLIC SAFETY 

Fire Department 

It is with great pleasure that I submit the following annual report of the operations, activities and 
accomplishments of the Wilmington Fire Department for the year 2012. 

In 2012, Deputy Fire Chief Edmund J. Corcoran, III and Fire Fighters George A. Anderson, Jr. and Robert E. 
Vassallo, Jr. retired and Fire Fighter David R. Feyler transferred to a neighboring fire department. One new 
member was appointed, Fire Fighter Russell D. Stering. 

The manual force consists of the Chief, Deputy Chief, six Lieutenants, twenty-nine Fire Fighters, one full- 
time clerk and one part-time clerk. The following roster is provided: 

Fire Chief 

Edward G. Bradbury, Jr. 

Deputy Fire Chief 

Richard T. McClellan 

Lieutenants 

John Brown, Jr. 
Gary J. Donovan 
Daniel M. Hurley, Jr. 
Joseph T. McMahon 
Christopher G. Pozzi 
Gary P. Robichaud 

Clerks 

Linda K. Cerullo 
Isabel E. Raschella - Part-Time 

Fire Fighters 



Anthony J. Adamczyk 
Brian D. Anderson 
Thomas C. Case 11a 
William F. Cavanaugh, III 
Thomas W. Ceres 
Walter R. Daley 
Kenneth P. Gray 
Brooke C. Green 
Eric M. Gronemeyer 
Jacob H. Gronemeyer 
William J. Herrick, Jr. 
Keith E. Kelly 
Jason M. Kennedy 
William J. Kent, III 
Andrew W. Leverone 




John F. McDonough 
Terry L. McKenna 
Michael J. McManus 
Erick J. Nansel 
Robert E. Patrie, Jr. 
Eric S. Robbins 
Frederick J. Ryan 
Russell D. Stering 
Megan L. Sullivan 
Charles R. Taylor, Jr. 
Rann R. Tingtella 
Robert W. Varey, III 
David P. Woods 
Robert J. Woods, Jr. 



Fire Fighters work to extinguish a 
house fire on North Street 

Photo by Lennie Malvone, Wilmington Patch 



-34- 



The department responded to a total of 3,649 calls for assistance during 2012. 



Patient Assist 


101 


Line Box, Mutual Aid 


6 


Commercial Building Fire 


1 


Lockout of Building House 


15 


Bomb Scare 





Medical Aid 


1,461 


Master Box 


154 


Mutual Aid - Ambulance 


139 


Burning Permits 


272 


Mutual Aid - Fire 


26 


Brush Fire 


46 


Motor Vehicle Crash 


250 


Chimney t ire 


1 


Odor, Any type 


1 Q 


Carbon Monoxide 


38 


Pump Job 





Gas Leaks 


11 


Service Call 


8 


Fire Drill 


63 


Smoke in Building 


14 


Haz Mat Incident 


2 


Smoke Detector Activation 


15 


Inspections/26F, Oil, Propane 


602 


Residential House/Structure 


5 


Investigations, Any Type 


341 


Training, Any Type 


10 


Keltron Acitivation 


1 


Truck/Car Fire 


10 


Stove Fire 


8 


Wires Arcing 


31 


Estimated value of property endangered was $3,200,000. Estimated property loss was $430,000. 


The following is a list of permits issued: 








Black Powder 


2 


Propane 


93 


Blasting 


2 


Smoke Detector 


184 


Class C Explosive 





Tank 


64 


Fire Alarm 


75 


Miscellaneous 


2 


Flammable Liquid 


27 


Sprinkler 


44 


Oil Burner 


130 


Gas Stations 


3 


Truck 


9 


Reports 


27 


Welding 


9 


Carnival 


1 


Plan Review 


61 


Suppression 





Copies 


113 


Dumpster 


16 


Oil Lines 


3 










TOTAL 


865 



As required by law, the Fire Prevention Bureau under the direction of Lt. Daniel M. Hurley, Jr. 
inspected all schools, public buildings, nursing homes and flammable storage facilities. Other 
inspections listed below: 



New Residential Plans Review 35 

New Residential Fire Inspections 35 

New Industrial Plans Review 26 

Fire Inspection Industrial/Commercial 26 

Underground Tank Removals 8 

Underground Tank Installations 

Aboveground Tank Removals 56 

Oil Burner/Tank 133 

Propane 93 

Nursing Home Inspections 12 

Gas Station Inspections 1 1 

Oil Truck & Pick-up Transfer Tank Inspections 26 



Shift personnel inspected 184 residential properties for smoke and carbon monoxide detectors in 
compliance with Massachusetts General Law Chapter 148, Section 26F. 



-35- 



Classrooms at all of the public schools K-5 and the Abundant Life Christian School and Learning 
Center grades K-8 have received instructions on fire safety by Lieutenants Daniel M. Hurley, Jr., 
Christopher G. Pozzi, Gary P. Robichaud and Fire Fighters Brooke C. Green, David P. Woods, Eric S. 
Robbins, Thomas W. Ceres and William F. Cavanaugh, III. 

The project to replace the outdated wire line fire alarm system continued through 2012 switching to the 
new wireless system. One hundred ten radio box systems have been completed. 

In 2012, the Wilmington Fire Department placed in-service the new Rapid Response Vehicle Engine 5. 
In 2012, the Wilmington Fire Department was the first in the state outside of a pilot program at the 
Basic Life Support (BLS) level to be trained to administer nasal Naloxone to opioids overdoses. In 
an overdose, opioids can slow breathing to the point of death. Some examples of opioids include 
Heroin, Oxycodone, Methadone, Fentanyl, Codeine and Morphine. Nasal Naloxone blocks the 
opioids and restores normal breathing when sprayed into the nose of someone who has overdosed. 

Others skills which members were trained in were Glucometry and Nebulizer Therapy. Glucometry 
allows us to get an accurate measurement of a patient's blood sugar level. This remains one of the 
best assessment aids we have, because diabetic emergencies remain some of the most common, most 
treatable and most easily confused disorders that we encounter. Nebulizer Therapy is an effective 
and efficient way to deliver medications directly into the lungs by inhalation. Patients with 
conditions such as Asthma, Pneumonia, Cystic Fibrosis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease 
can all benefit from Nebulizer Therapy. 

I wish to extend my sincere appreciation to all members of the Fire Department for their continued 
dedication and professionalism providing this vital service to the residents of the Town. 

As always, the support of the Police Department as well as Dispatch is appreciated. 

Best wishes to Michael A. Caira in his retirement and for all his support. I would like to acknowledge 
the new Town Manager Jeffrey M. Hull, for his continued support of the Fire Department as well as 
the new Assistant Town Manager, Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and all other Town 
agencies for their assistance during the past year. 



In accordance with the By-Laws of the Town of Wilmington, I hereby respectfully submit the annual 
report on the activities of the Wilmington Police Department for the year 2012. 

The members of the Wilmington Police Department are truly grateful for the honor of serving the 
residents of the Town of Wilmington. We consider the residents of Wilmington as partners in the 
safety and security of all who live and work within its boundaries. Thank you to all who have 
assisted us in our goal of providing superior public safety services to all. The attentive assistance of 
the community is the catalyst for the success we have achieved. 

The men and women of the Wilmington Police Department pride themselves with the respect they 
receive from their partners in law enforcement throughout the region. Our officer's commitment to 
regional policing is unparalleled. The leadership roles they hold in many extrajurisdictional 
initiatives are a testament to their level of expertise and professionalism in the field of Criminal 
Justice. Our membership in the North East Massachusetts Law Enforcement Council (NEMLEC) 
remains strong. The department has members on the Special Weapon and Tactics (SWAT) team, 
Regional Response Team (RRT) and Detectives and School Threat Assessment and Response System 
(STARS). The expertise and training received through membership on these teams is invaluable to 
the department. We remain committed to assigning Task Force Agents in the DEA and FBI. 




-36- 



The Department's participation in the Certification and Accreditation process is steadfast. We 
continue to review our policies and procedures to remain compliant with changes in the laws and 
best practices in police science. As we review and document our programs and initiatives we develop 
enhancements to the delivery of our service in Wilmington and surrounding communities as well. In 
2012 we won the Top Gold award in the Massachusetts Law Enforcement Challenge. As a repeat 
Gold Award recipient in this challenge, we are proud of the state-wide recognition our officers have 
received in traffic safety initiatives. We have taken a leadership role in this effort with our 
contiguous communities providing assistance and coordinating joint efforts in traffic calming 
programs. Working with our partners in Tewksbury, Reading, Burlington and the Massachusetts 
State Police has allowed us to reduce traffic crashes by approximately 100 incidents this past year. 
We held our first Sobriety Checkpoint in partnership with the Massachusetts State Police and the 
Tewksbury Police Department. This checkpoint removed over 10 impaired operators from the roads 
in Wilmington in a few short hours. We then assisted in a second Sobriety checkpoint in Tewksbury 
resulting in multiple impaired drivers being removed from the streets as well. Regional traffic safety 
programs are proving to be extremely effective in reducing impaired operation through the joint 
efforts of contiguous communities. 

The Department experienced two impacting retirements within its roster in 2012. Lieutenant J. 
Christopher Neville and Inspector Thomas A. Miller retired in April and May respectively. Lt. 
Neville's commitment to the Town of Wilmington never wavered during his tenure as a Wilmington 
Police Officer. His tenacious pursuit of justice and compassionate service were evident in the intense 
work ethic he brought to his job each day. Inspector Miller also provided dedicated service to the 
department and community. His work as a detective was tireless and the victims he has comforted 
are many and never forgotten. Both retirees have always been committed to the residents of 
Wilmington as volunteers in many organizations and charities. Their absence from the department 
is felt daily and their legacy of commitment is a beacon to those who follow in their footsteps. 

In May of 2012 the Department sent five student officers to the Lowell Police Academy. Officers 
Kevin P. Cavanaugh, Rafael G. Cruz, Daniel P. Furbush, IV, Michael E. Johnson and Julio J. Quiles 
successfully completed the 24-week training in Lowell. During the Academy they were trained in 
Community Policing Techniques, Emergency Vehicle Operation, Firearms, First Aide, Defensive 
Tactics, Legal Issues and the Physical Fitness component culminated with a ten mile run. 
Successful completion of this training course is a testament to the quality individuals representing 
Wilmington in this regional academy. This is the largest contingent of officers sent to a training 
academy at the same time in the history of the Department. 

Officer Eric T. Palmer began training with K-9 Ridic after a brief partnership with K-9 Ronan who 
was unable to complete the rigorous training at the Boston Police Academy. K-9 Ridic completed the 
Boston Police Department Patrol Certification class in late spring. Officer Palmer and K-9 Ridic 
then completed the Drug Certification class in early fall. Officer Palmer and K-9 Ridic are 
continuing in the footsteps of K-9 Kimo as they successfully participate regionally in competitions for 
Patrol Dog teams. 

Again, the members of the Wilmington Police Department would like to express their sincere 
appreciation for the support we have received from the community in 2012. Without the respect, 
compassion and commitment of the residential and business communities our successes could not 
have been realized. 



-37- 



The following was the Departmental Roster of Personnel for 2012: 



Chief of Police 

Michael R. Begonis 

Deputy Chief 

Robert V. Richter 

Lieutenants 

Joseph A. Desmond, Operations/Grants 
Scott A. Sencabaugh, Emergency Planning/Training 
Brian T. Pupa, Accreditation and Policy Development 



Sergeants 

Christopher J. Ahem Charles R. Fiore 

David L. Axelrod David M. McCue, Jr. 

David J. Bradbury Daniel E. Murray 

Detectives and Specialists 

James R. White, Court/Inspector John M. Bossi, Narcotics 

Julie M. Pozzi, DARE Brian M. Moon, Safety Officer 

David A. Sugrue, Inspector Chester A. Bruce, III, School Resource 

Patrick B. Nally, Inspector Brian Gillis, School Resource 
Brian J. Stickney, Inspector 



Uniform Patrol Officers 



Ronald J. Alpers, Jr. 
Dan C. Cadigan 
Jonathan C. Carlson 
Kevin P. Cavanaugh 
Paul R. Chalifour 
Rafael G. Cruz 
John W. Delorey 
Daniel P. D'Eon 
Christopher J. Dindo 
Richard A. DiPerri, Jr. 
Anthony Fiore 
Daniel P. Furbush, IV 
Joseph F. Harris, Jr. 
Brian T. Hermann 



Paul W. Jepson 
Michael E. Johnson 
Paul A. Krzeminski 
Louis Martignetti 
Stephen F. Mauriello 
Thomas A. McConologue 
Eric T. Palmer/ K-9 Ridic 
Michael J. Patterson 
Julio J. Quiles 
Dennis P. Rooney 
Matthew D. Stavro 
Brian D. Thornton 
Walter A. Varey 
Michael W. Wandell 



Clerical Staff 

Julie G. Clark 
Susan M. O'Neil 



-38- 



The following are some statistical data that reflect calls for service over the past year. 
Wilmington Police Department Statistics, Year 2012 



ARRESTS OR SUMMONS" 




SEX CRIMES- 

K-J A— J J. x. \_/ 1 villi I_J kj . 




Arson 


2 


Rape 


2 


Assault & Battery 


55 


Indecent Exposure 





Rrpflking' & Entprini? 


11 


Indecent A&B 


2 


Counterfeiting/Forgery 





Other 





Disordprlv 


5 


TOTAL SEX CRIMES: 


4 


T javrpnv 

Udl 11 V 


50 






TjJivpptiv TYTntoT* Vphiclp 

1 JC( l V. l 1 1 V IVlUtUl V L 111*.. 1C 


1 


MOTOR VEHICLE VIOLATIONS: 




T.innriv T .Q\xrc 

3HS\± UU1 -Lid Wo 


23 


Spat Rplt 


509 


]Y/T*a 1 lfirn 1 C D ci TYl Q CO 
IVXcxlxCltJ U.O J-ZdllldgC 


18 

AO 


T Tgi n o* \^/ii"nrnii" Aiii~Vir»vii"\7 

Uoilig VV xLllUUL ilLALHUl ILy 




IVTii vHpv 

1VX ill \ * V 1 





Lirpnsp Violations 


266 


Narcotics 


19 


Endangering 


19 


OTT Drunk DvivirtP" 

V 7 y^J x j i-J X LI 11 XV IJ 1 IV iiiu 


72 


TiPavinf? Spptip Prnnpytv Damap'P 


25 




1 


ODPratinj? UnHpr Tnflupncp 


79 


RpppivinP" StolpTI PvODprtV 

lVvV/vl V lllu k .MUIv 11 1 1 v J 


6 


T Inrpsristprpd/T Ininsiirpfl 


230 


liuuuci y 


9 






Spv Offpn^ps not Ranp 

k_/\Z;A WXXCIXoCO> J.JLVJI/ -1 LcipC 


1 


Other 


2 710 

•Ji 1 1U 


Other 


309 


TOTAL VIOLATIONS SHOWN: 


6,231 


TOTAL: 


575 










CITATIONS ISSUED: 




PROTECTIVE CUSTODY: 




Warnings 


2,893 


Ages: 




Complaints 


134 


Under 12 





Non-Criminal 


1,592 


13/14 





Arrests 


133 


15 


o 


TOTAL CITATIONS- 

x v_y x nu v. x x rr x x v/ 1 > vj> . 


4 752 


16 


3 






17 





OTHER CRIMES REPORTED: 




TOTAL UNDER 18- 

i v_/ x nu vJ i n i/ i j iv. x \j . 


3 


ThvPAts - AvQnn RnTtihinP 1 TCillmp* 

i in v ai o niouii) uuiiiuiiiw, iviiiniu 


15 

X tj 






Assault & Battery, Assault: 




18 





Firearm Or Knife 


5 


19 


1 


Other Weapon 


9 


20 


o 


A f?2Ta va tpd - Ha n d /Foot 


16 


21 


6 


Simnlp - A&B Assault 


102 


22 


2 


TOTAL A&B's, ASSAULTS, THREATS: 


147 


23 


2 






24 


i 

JL 


BREAKING & ENTERING- 




25/34 


24 


Residential 


39 


35/54 


18 


Non Residential 


35 


55 & Over 


_1 


Attempted 


_6 


TOTAL OVER 18: 


55 


TOTAL BREAKING & ENTERING 


80 


TOTAL PROTECTIVE CUSTODY 


55 


ROBBERY: 








Firearm 









Other Weapon 


2 






Strong Arm 


1 






TOTAL ROBBERIES: 


3 



-39- 



LARCENIES: INCIDENTS REPORTED: 

Larceny From Person 1 Warrants Served 132 

Credit Card Fraud 20 Disturbances 388 

Shoplifting 12 Domestic Problems No Arrests 139 

From Motor Vehicle 7 Assist Other Agencies 720 

M/V Parts & Accessories 22 Medical Emergency 1,266 

Bikes 4 Juvenile Complaints 20 

From Buildings 36 Suspicious Activity, Person, Vehicle 1,544 

From Coin Machines Malicious Damage Complaints 221 

Other 180 Missing Persons 53 

TOTAL LARCENIES: 282 Other Calls/Complaints 12,674 

M/V Accidents 707 

Forgery, Uttering, Identity Fraud 11 Alarms 1,122 

Traffic Complaint 1.631 

MOTOR VEHICLES STOLEN: TOTAL: 20,617 
Autos 1 

Trucks & Buses 2 OTHER DEPARTMENT FUNCTIONS: 

Other Vehicles Restraining Orders Served 109 

TOTAL M/V THEFT: 3 Parking Tickets Issued 74 

Firearms I.D. Issued 38 

RECOVERED MOTOR VEHICLES: License To Carry Issued 355 
Stolen Wilmington 

and Recovered Wilmington 2 Gunsmith Permits 
Stolen Wilmington Reports to Insurance 

and Recovered Out of Town 2 Companies and Attorneys 540 
Stolen Out of Town 

and Recovered Wilmington l Animal Complaints 788 

TOTAL RECOVERED: 5 Child Safety Seats Installed 178 

Motor Vehicle Stops 6.230 

TOTAL: 8,312 



Complaints 
Trips 

Trip Hours 

Animals Picked Up 

Animals Returned to Owners 

Animals Adopted 

Animals Picked Up Deceased* 

Animals Quarantined 

Animals Euthanized** 

Total Days for Pets in Kennel 

Pets Vaccinated at Rabies Clinic 

Barn Inspections 

Citation Fees Issued 



676 
698 
679.5 
23 
19 
4 
41 
7 
9 
69 
137 
35 

$55.00 




* Majority of which are wildlife 
** All wildlife 



-40- 



FACILITIES & INFRASTRUCTURE 




The Public Buildings Department is responsible for the maintenance of all town and school 
buildings. We are responsible to ensure that facilities are properly cleaned and maintained for town 
employees, school children, staff and for the general public. The Public Buildings Department 
provides service for town-owned traffic signals, set up for Elections, Town Meetings and other 
community events such as the Fourth of July. 

The following are highlights for some of the projects completed during 2012: 

Routine maintenance was performed in all school and municipal buildings. 
Voting areas were set up for elections. 
Set up for Fourth of July Festivities. 

Chairs and choral risers were moved from school to school for musical concerts and plays. 
Food and supplies delivered for each school. 

Chairs, staging and sound system were set up for the Annual Town Meeting. 

All schools were cleaned over the summer and ready for a fresh start to the school year. 

All town buildings' boilers, Univents and exhaust systems were cleaned and serviced over the 
summer. 

A new roof was installed on the Old South School building. 

A new roof was installed on the Public Buildings headquarters. 

Installation of two new high efficiency hot water storage tanks at the Shawsheen Elementary School 
that replaced a 1970, 2,000 gallon water heater as part of an energy conservation project. 

New insulated garage doors with openers were installed at the Department of Public Works Garage. 

New gas main brought to the Department of Public Works Building. 

Removed the original oil fire heating system and underground fuel storage tank at the Department 
of Public Works Garage and installed a new heating system fueled by natural gas. 



A new handicap restroom was installed at the 
Town Beach. 

All windows and the front and rear doors were 
replaced at the Wilmington Memorial Library. 

A new roof was installed at the Wilmington 
Memorial Library. 

A new Life Safety Fire Alarm system was installed 
at the Woburn Street School. 

A new Life Safety Fire Alarm system was installed 
at the North Intermediate School. 




Wilmington Memorial Library 
window and door replacement project 



-41- 



New radio controlled fire alarm Master boxes have been installed in school and town buildings to 
replace the old hardwired system. 

All town-owned traffic signals were maintained and repaired as needed. 

All lighting maintained and repaired for the Town Park, Town Common, tennis courts and the 
exterior of all town-owned buildings. 

I gratefully acknowledge the support of the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, town departments, 
school administration and especially all the employees of the Public Buildings Department for their 
continued support and cooperation making 2012 a productive year. 



The year 2012 was a busy one for the Permanent Building Committee. Being part of the High School 
Working Group and the High School Building Committee for the design, planning and construction 
of our new high school is an exciting time for all of us involved. We look forward to, and are 
committed to, the challenge of providing the children of Wilmington with a new state-of-the-art high 
school with all the current technologies, amenities and efficiencies to better their education and a 
facility that the residents of Wilmington can be proud of. 

We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, town 
departments, school administration and especially the people of Wilmington in their support and 
cooperation for future projects. 



I 




Wilmington High School from the bleachers of the football stadium 



-42- 



Department of Public Works 



In accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington, I, Donald N. Onusseit, hereby respectfully 
submit the annual report on the activities of the Wilmington Department of Public Works for the year 
2012. 

The Department of Public Works consists of six (6) divisions: Highway, Tree, Cemetery, Parks and 
Grounds, Engineering and Water & Sewer. 

Major Pub he Works Projects and Programs : 

The Department of Public Works worked on the following major projects during 2012: 
Lawrence Street Sidewalks (Phase I) : 

This project consisted of the preparation and installation of approximately 1,960 linear feet of new 
bituminous sidewalks along Lawrence Street from Glen Road to Hamlin Lane. During 2012, final 
sidewalk paving and bituminous curbing installation were completed. This followed the installation 
of the infiltrating drainage systems, the sidewalks rough grading, the minor retaining walls 
construction and the placement of the first course of sidewalk bituminous binder pavement in 2011. 

Construction of the Whipple Road Bridge Deck Replacement : 

Working with the Towns of Billerica and Tewksbury and the engineering firm of CME Associates, 
the Town of Wilmington completed the design plans and permits to replace the existing deck at the 
Whipple Road Bridge. Construction funding was provided by the Massachusetts Department of 
Transportation. The project was completed in September and officially opened on September 21, 
2012. 

Eurasian Milfoil Monitoring at Silver Lake : 

As part of the Town's ongoing invasive plant management program at Silver Lake, the lake was 
chemically treated for Eurasian Milfoil and Curlyleaf Pondweed on June 7, 2012. Monitoring will 
continue during 2013 and a decision will be made on whether treatment in 2013 is deemed 
necessary. 

Highway Division (658-4481) 

All regular highway maintenance work was carried out during the year, such as sweeping streets, 
instalhng street and warning signs, patching streets, cleaning catch basins, cutting brush along the 
roadsides, picking up trash along our roadsides, painting and replacing guardrails, repairing broken 
curbing, repairing sidewalk and walkway damage, painting safety lines and crosswalks on streets, etc. 

Drainage : 

Cunningham Street (Phase 1) : Drainage improvements consisting of multiple catch basins and 
infiltration chambers were installed to address a continuing drainage problem at the vicinity of 
Lexington Street. 

Chestnut Street : In the area of Patches Pond Lane, a catch basin and infiltration chambers were 
installed to alleviate roadway ponding. 

Eames Street : The Department of Public Works installed catch basins and infiltration chambers in the 
vicinity of Jewell Drive to improve drainage in anticipation of a complete reconstruction of Eames Street 
in 2013. 

Culvert Replacement : A collapsed CMP culvert on Ballardvale Street was replaced with a new culvert 
pipe in September. 



-43- 



Roadway Projects: 



Chapter 90 funds from the Massachusetts Department of Transportation were used for bituminous 
concrete resurfacing and associated reconstruction on a total of 12,660 linear feet (2.4 miles) of 
roadway work on the following projects: 

Chestnut Street - Burlington Avenue to Butters Row (3,250 linear feet) 

Freeport Drive neighborhood - Freeport Drive, Lucaya Circle, Heather Drive, Sparhawk Drive 

(6,610 linear feet) 

Grove Avenue - Lake Street to Winchell Road (800 linear feet) 

Lake Street - Shawsheen Avenue to South Street (2,000 linear feet) 

Storm Events and Snow & Ice Removal : 



The Highway Division recorded 18 inches of snow for the winter of 2011-2012. The average annual 
snowfall for Wilmington is approximately 56 inches. 



Household Rubbish Collection, Disposal and Recycling (658-4481) 



The Department of Public Works is responsible for the Town's various refuse disposal and recycling 
programs. These programs include household rubbish and recycling; appliance, television and computer 
monitor recycling; yardwaste recycling; waste oil collection and household hazardous waste collection. 
This year 363 cars participated in the Town's Household Hazardous Waste Day held on May 12, 2012. 



Solid Waste and Recycling 



In 2012 the town collected the following amounts of trash and recyclable material: 



Trash Collected at Curbside 
Recyclables Collected at Curbside 
White Goods Collected at Curbside 
Yardwaste Collected at Curbside 
Yardwaste Delivered to Recycling Center 
Cathode Ray Tubes (TVs, Monitors) Collected 



8,258 Tons 

1,540 Tons (Recycled) 

25 Tons (Recycled) 

920 Tons (Recycled) 

380 Tons (Recycled) 

40 Tons (Recycled) 



The yardwaste recycling program continued with the recycling of leaves, grass clippings, brush and 
Christmas trees. In January, approximately 2,100 Christmas trees were collected at curbside by the 
Department of Public Works. 



During the spring and summer, the DPW strengthened the enforcement of the Town's mandatory 
recycling By-law, and as a result the Town saw an increase in recycling rates of over 20 percent. This 
saved the Town approximately $30,000 in 2012. 

Working under a Beneficial Use Determination (BUD) issued by the Massachusetts Department of 
Environmental Protection (DEP), the DPW removed the following waste material from our Yardwaste 
Center in 2012: 



Water Treatment Plant Residuals 772 Tons 

Street Sweepings/Catch Basin Cleanings 1,545 Tons 

The mixed material was approved by DEP for cover material at the Merrimac, MA sanitary landfill. 



-44- 



Tree Division (658-2809) 

The Tree Division carried out all regular 
maintenance work such as trimming, cutting, tree 
removal and tree planting. We removed roadside 
trees that were dead or interfered with public safety 
at numerous locations. 

The Town Common was illuminated again this year 
with Christmas lights installed by the Tree Division. 
This year the town used approximately 5,950 LED 
lights. LED lights use significantly less energy than 
conventional lights. 

Cemetery Division (658-3901) 




Trimming limbs at Silver Lake 



All regular maintenance work was carried out throughout the year, such as mowing grass, weeding, 
trimming, resetting grave markers, pouring foundations for monuments, etc. 

INTERNMENTS 

Residents 66 

Non-Residents 61 

Moved/Disinterred 

TOTAL: 127 

Receipts $82,736.00 
Reserve $18,000.00 
Trust Fund $18,000.00 

Parks & Grounds Division (658-4481) 

In 2012, the DPW continued the new approach to turf management on the town's playing fields, which 
was begun in 2010. This turf management program has the goal of improving the safety and playability 
of the town's 39 acres of playing fields using the following program components: 

• Greater use of organic soil amendments and fertilizers to build the long term sustainability of 
the soils. 

• Increased core aerations with the addition of a much greater concentration of sports turf mix. 

• Greater mowing frequency to improve plant health. 

In addition to the turf management plan, regular maintenance was carried out throughout the year 
such as cutting grass, trimming shrubs, aerating playing fields, marking ball fields for baseball, softball, 
football, field hockey and soccer. All fields and parks were fertilized and brush was cleared from the air 
vents at all the town's schools. 

Athletic Field Projects : All fields were aerated and fertilized during the year. 

A new T-Ball backstop was installed at the Boutwell Early Childhood Center playground field in March 
Engineering Division (658-4499) 

The Engineering Division assisted town departments, boards and commissions with engineering related 
projects. This included the review of subdivision plans, site plans and special permits for the Planning 
Board, Notice of Intent plan filings for the Conservation Commission and various Board of Appeals 
cases. The Division also established surety estimates for subdivision projects and performed 
construction inspections of subdivision roadways. In addition, surveying services and construction 
inspection were provided for various projects of the Department of Public Works. 

-45- 



Water & Sewer Department (978-658-4711) 



Water: 



During the year the Water Department continued its ongoing mission to maximize the effectiveness 
of the water distribution system, with a specific focus on operational efficiency and infrastructure 
upgrades. 

As in previous years, the Water Department continued the effort to upgrade undersized water 
mains. During the summer of 2012, the Water Department, in an effort to reduce cost, used in-house 
personnel to install 2,100 feet of new 12 inch Ductile Iron Pipe on Grove Avenue, between Winchell 
Road and Burnap Street. This new 12 inch section of pipe replaces the previously existing 
undersized main. The addition of the new water main improves water quality, enhances water 
hydraulics and increases fire protection for areas in the Grove Avenue vicinity. 

A 2012 Ford F-150 utility truck was purchased to replace an aging truck in the fleet. The new truck 
is capable of storing equipment used by Water Department personnel for scheduled maintenance and 
also for emergency situations such as water main breaks. The new truck also assists in snow 
removal operations. 

Also during the year, the Water Department purchased both a Skid Steer and a Mini-Excavator. 
The two pieces of equipment add levels of practicality and versatility to operations and have become 
valuable assets to the department. 

The 11 master meters in our system were inspected and calibrated. All were found to be in good 
condition and are reading accurately. These meters quantify the amount of water pumped from the 
following locations; the aquifer at the pump stations, water entering the water treatment plants 
(WTP), water leaving the WTP and water withdrawals at the interconnections with Woburn, 
Burlington and the MWRA. 

The three water storage tanks, Nassau Avenue, Ballardvale Street and Hillside Way, also received 
some repair and maintenance work during 2012. The vent screen at the Ballardvale tank was 
replaced, adding a crucial preventative layer in the efforts to eliminate potential problems. At both 
the Nassau Avenue and Hillside Way tanks, the altitude valves, which are used to control the filling 
of the tanks, were inspected. 

During the months of April and May, a water main flushing and valve-exercising program was 
performed. The department utilizes the flushing of mains to remove sediments and tuberculation 
that have accumulated in the water pipes. Approximately 6.4 million gallons of water was used to 
accomplish this task. This is a necessary procedure to generate the delivery of high quality potable 
water to your home or business. In addition to flushing the mains and exercising valves, personnel 
also inspected all municipal fire hydrants during this time. Hydrants that were discovered as not 
operating properly were repaired or replaced. 

The department maintains and repairs as needed: 126 miles of water mains; 7,496 service 
connections; 1,174 fire hydrants; 754 main valves; 3 storage tanks; 9 pumping stations and 2 water 
treatment facilities in the town. In addition, the department removes snow and ice adjacent to the 
fire hydrants and assists the Highway Division with roadway snow and ice removal. 

Pumping Statistics: 



Wilmington Treated 
Maximum per Day 
Maximum per Week 
Maximum per Month 



GALLONS 
2,388,056 
16,131,703 
70,274,760 



CUBIC FEET 



319,259 
2,156,645 
9,395,021 



-46- 



MWRA Purchased 
Maximum per Day 
Maximum per Week 
Maximum per Month 

Combined 
Maximum per Day 
Maximum per Week 
Maximum per Month 

Average per Day 
Average per Month 

Total Purchased (MWRA) 
Total Treated (Wilmington) 
Total Provided for Distribution 

Total Pumped from Aquifer (Raw) 

Precipitation Statistics: 

Annual Rain Fall 
Annual Snow Fall 



GALLONS 
1,671,000 
5,036,000 

14,245,062 



3,467,155 
20,977,807 
84,519,822 

2,109,055 
64,319,842 

36,908,578 
734,929,521 
771,838,099 

763,005,516 



38.34" 
31.00" 



CUBIC FEET 
223,396 
673,262 
1,904,420 



463,523 
2,804,520 
11,299,441 

281,959 
8,598,909 

4,934,302 
98,252,610 
103,186,912 

201,439,521 









PERCENTAGE OF 


Consumption Statistics: 


GALLONS 


CUBIC FEET 


TOTAL PUMPED 


Municipal Use 


10,750,810 


1,437,274 


1.4 


Residential Use 


437,764,861 


58,524,714 


56.7 


Commercial Use. 


41,485,075 


5,546,133 


5.4 


Industrial Use 


247,569,711 


33,097,555 


32.1 


Annual Water Main Flushing 


6,495,030 


868,320 


0.8 


Miscellaneous Hydrant Use 


1,763,950 


235,822 


0.2 


Total Accounted For Pumped 


745,829,436 


99,709,818 


96.6 


Unaccounted for Use * 


26,008,663 


3,477,094 


3.4 



* The difference between accounted for and unaccounted for water consists of water lost to main 
and service breaks, unrecorded water use fighting fires, street sweeping and theft. 

Water Distribution: 



The following new water mains were constructed in 2012: 

In-House Water Main Improvements Length Size Hydrants 

Grove Avenue 2,100' 12" 2 




Grove Avenue water main improvements 



-47- 



Water Mains Installed by Private Contractors 

Webber Street 300' 6" 

Sewer Collection System: 

Sewer: 

The Sewer Department maintains approximately 20 miles of main pipe, 8 pump stations, 1,590 
services and a septage receiving facility. 

During 2012, the department continued to maintain and clean sewer lines as needed. Any 
discovered leaks, blockages or structural deficiencies were corrected as soon as possible. In general, 
the sewer system continues to be in very good condition. 

As part of the 2012 preventative maintenance program, the Sewer Department inspected and 
cleaned, as needed, the areas of town that are identified as potential problem areas. 

There were five service connections made to the sewer system during 2012. 

HUMAN SERVICES & CONSUMER AFFAIRS 

Library 

The Town's Technology Center 

In 2012, the Wilmington Memorial Library demonstrated how 
it is truly becoming the Town's Technology Center where 
residents can learn how to navigate the 21 st century world. 
Curtis Wyant, Technology Librarian, conducted 26 hands-on 
Microsoft Office classes including Word, Excel and PowerPoint. 
These computer classes were conducted in the Banda Room 
which is converted to a Computer Training Lab where students 
use eight laptop computers purchased by the Friends of the 
Library. Other technology programs presented to a larger 
audience included digital photography, e-Readers, computer 
security and iPad basics. 

The popularity and interest in e-Readers and eBooks continues to grow. During the summer, the 
library began circulating six Nooks and Kindles loaded with adult bestsellers and classics and ten 
Nooks loaded with school summer reading titles for teens. More patrons now own their own e- 
Readers and many come to the library looking for assistance. In response to many inquiries about 
how to download e-Books, music and magazines, Technology Librarian Curtis Wyant developed video 
tutorials for the library's website making the download process very clear and easy. 

Technology enabled the library to make local history more 
accessible to remote users. In July, the Town Crier archives back 
to 1955 became available on the library's website thanks to a 
digitization project funded by Wilmington Rotary, the Friends of 
the Library and local funds. Kudos to Curtis Wyant and Charlotte 
Wood, Assistant Library Director, for their expertise and fortitude 
in making this project a reality. In addition, Gerry O'Reilly's 
pictorial books about Silver Lake and Wilmington and the 
Wilmington High School yearbooks back to the 1940's were 
digitized by the Boston Public Library (BPL) and are now available 
on the library's website. These two digitization projects were done 
in conjunction with the Internet Archive at no cost to the library 
thanks to a federal grant awarded to BPL. 





Young patrons use laptops to write 
and draw for library's Star Mag 



-48- 



The library also continues to add more technology-based services for patrons. In October, the library 
purchased a subscription to Zinio, a digital magazine online collection. Via the library's website, 
patrons can now access over 90 magazine titles, cover to cover, from their mobile phone, tablet or 
computer. The Friends of the Library also purchased an iPad for patrons to use in the library and 
enjoy Zinio on a tablet computer. The 2012 statistical report for the first time includes the total 
number of audio, eBook, music and magazine downloads made by patrons. 

Thanks to the Friends of the Library and the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Foundation, two iPads 
were purchased and loaded with educational apps for toddlers, preschoolers and school aged kids for 
in-house use in the Children's Room. 



The Town's Events Center 



High caliber library events ranging from professional performers and expert speakers would not be 
possible without funding from the Friends of the Library. In 2012, Friends funding for library 
events totaled approximately $15,000, most of which came from the Book Store Next Door proceeds. 

Adult programming continued to be robust in 2012 with over 80 well-attended events. Topics ranged 
from consumer rights, to Queen Victoria, to raising backyard chickens to a themed series titled "The 
Road to the White House" featuring a month long penny vote for president. A couponing group, led 
by Gloria Corcoran, was started in April and continues to meet monthly. In addition, the library 
hosted two popular "After Hours" concerts, one in March featuring Four Guys in Tuxes and one in 
December featuring The New England Tenors. Tickets for both concerts sold out quickly with 
audiences giving both performances rave reviews. 



If 



A young patron reads to Mackenzie 



From babies attending "Baby Times" to kids' ages eight and up 
creating their own magazine, the library offers a variety of 
opportunities for children and their families to attend educational 
and entertaining programs. Children's Librarian Barbara Raab 
introduced a new program this year featuring Mackenzie, the 
Listening Scottie, a Certified Therapy dog. Signing up for 15 
minute sessions one evening per month, children read out loud to 
Mackenzie, which helps these beginning readers to increase their 
reading confidence. The library adopted the state wide 2012 
summer reading program theme "Dream Big Read" with 628 kids 
registering either online or in person and logging over 2,000 books. 
Over 1,500 children attended a total of 36 events during the 
summer including performances by musical groups, puppet shows, 
movies, crafts, story times and more. Adult, teen and children 

readers were all invited to the Ice Cream Social finale event at the end of August when winners of 
the grand prizes were announced. All readers had the opportunity to enter to win an e-Reader. 

We celebrated National Poetry Month in April with our Annual Poetry 
Contest. The 2012 theme "animals" inspired over 200 poems from poets of 
all ages. The winners were invited to the library to read their winning 
poems and receive prizes and certificates. 

During National Library Week, April 8 to April 14, we asked patrons in 
the library and on our website "Why is the library important to you?" We 
received many great comments such as the following: 

• It's a vibrant and energetic place, offering all sorts of programs, 
fun, musical, historic, etc. for all ages. Joanne Poulin 

• It allows me to read all kind of books that I would never buy for 
myself. Reading takes you anywhere you want to go. Michelle 
Valente 

• Libraries are an integral part of a community... part social, part 
educational... in fact they are the heart of a community. Suzanne 
Schreyer 




Poetry Winner 
Christine Blaisdell 



-49- 




Robert Hayes and Katie Huffman 
at the Community Fair 



The third annual Community Fair was held on Saturday, 
September 22 on the Swain Green. This forum was developed by 
the library as a way for residents to learn about available services 
and volunteer opportunities with the goal of sparking community 
engagement and civic pride. The Fair featured over 30 non-profit 
organizations serving Wilmington plus vendors from the Farmers 
Market. This year's fair also featured a Town of Wilmington 
information table and an opportunity for residents to talk with 
retiring Town Manager Michael A. Caira and new Town Manager 
Jeffrey M. Hull. A shredding truck was on hand once again 
providing on site shredding. Over 100 vehicles came through the 
shredding line and approximately 500 people attended the fair. 
In conjunction with the fair this year, the library also sponsored a 
"Wilmington through Art" contest. Eighteen art entries depicting 
scenes of Wilmington were entered and displayed in the library 
the week preceding the fair. Wilmington Arts Council judges 
selected three winners and one honorable mention. Cash prizes 
for first, second and third place were awarded by the Friends of 
the Library. 




Magician Joe Ferranti wows visitors 
at the Community Fair 




Marylou Healy, Tina Stewart and Peggy Kane 



-50- 



Collaboration with Wilmington Public Schools 



All six Wilmington Public Elementary Schools held School Nights at the library in 2012 with over 
785 students and their families, teachers, reading specialists, principals and administrators 
participating. The library issued 60 new library cards at School Nights. All School Night events 
featured a scavenger hunt, raffle drawings, guest readers and light refreshments. Barbara Raab, 
Children's Librarian, also participated in the Wilmington Public School STEM night, served as a 
mystery reader in Kindergarten classrooms, made presentations to teachers and visited elementary 
schools to promote the Summer Reading Program. The summer reading brochures were distributed 
to all Wilmington Public School Elementary students, to the Wilmington Middle School students and 
students entering ninth grade. 



Teen Librarian Brandy Danner's "30 second" book 
talks were well received by students at the 
Wilmington Middle School and Wilmington High 
School. In the spring, Brandy presented book talks 
to 106 students and in the fall to 550 students. 
After heai'ing these book talks, it is estimated that 
150 books were checked out at the library. Brandy 
also wrote an article in VOYA, a national magazine 
for teen librarians, about the effective 30 second 
book talk for teens. In the fall, Brandy visited five 
sophomore history classes to provide instruction in 
using the library's databases in preparation for the 
upcoming research assignment; taught a four- 
session class on creating book trailers to students at 
Wilmington Middle School; and worked with the 
high school Visual Arts Department on designing 
covers for summer reading titles. 

The creation of the Town of Wilmington Historical Coloring Book was spearheaded by Assistant 
Library Director Charlotte Wood who worked with Museum Curator Terry McDermott and 
Wilmington High School Art Teachers Jen Fidler and Megan Hinman. Art students contributed over 
20 illustrations depicting Wilmington's history. The Friends of the Library subsidized the printing of 
the coloring book which is for sale at $5.00 a copy. 




Toe jam Puppet Band entertains children at the library 




-51- 



Staff News and Operational Changes 



Thanks to funding support from the Friends of the Library, Tina Stewart, Library Director; Katie 
Huffman, Adult Services Librarian; Brandy Danner, Teen Librarian and Barbara Raab, Children's 
Librarian, had the opportunity to attend to the Public Library Association Conference in 
Philadelphia in March with over 8,000 librarians from all over the country. This national conference 
provided ideas and inspiration critical for keeping abreast of trends in today's rapidly changing 
library environment. Wilmington librarians were also very involved in the Merrimack Valley 
Library Consortium (MVLC), serving as chairs on multiple standing and ad-hoc committees. Katie 
Huffman also served on the statewide Resource Sharing Planning Committee, which develops 
strategic goals and plans for sharing databases, e-Books and other resources. 

The library saw a number of staff changes this year. Two part-time Library Assistants retired; Carol 
MacDougall; in March and Barbara Bresnahan in December. In August, Gayle Field was hired as a 
part-time Library Assistant. Jenny Arch, part-time Reference Librarian resigned in May and 
Marissa Szumowski was hired in June to fill this position. Katie Huffman, Adult Services Librarian, 
resigned in September to become the Library Director at the Gleason Public Library in Carbsle, 
Massachusetts. In order to continue the marketing initiatives developed by Katie Huffman and to 
further promote library services, a Marketing Librarian was recruited and will begin work at the 
library in January, 2013. In September, we implemented a "single service" desk on the first floor of 
the library for more efficient use of space and staff. This move involved reconfiguration of the 
reference desk and circulation desk into one service point. 





Philip MacKenzie with Autumn Path 



which will add to the welcoming ambience 
and tea in the library, a service provided by the Friends of the Library 



Creating a Warm and Welcoming Place 

The "Wilmington through Art Contest" provided an 
opportunity to decorate the library with some 
permanent art work depicting scenes of 
Wilmington. The Friends of the Library purchased 
"Autumn Path" painted by Philip MacKenzie in 
honor of retiring Town Manager Michael A. Caira 
for his 22 years of support to the Wilmington 
Memorial Library. Four other "Wilmington through 
Art" entries were purchased and hung on the first 
floor. 

The building envelope was improved with the 
installation of a new roof in the summer and new 
replacement windows in the fall. The new windows 
are not only an energy efficiency improvement but 
also an aesthetic improvement. The Friends of the 
Library plan to fund the new window treatments 
Last but not least, in December we began selling coffee 



Proud of Our Accomplishments 



Since the loss of funding for a new building in 2005, the staff has committed itself to not only 
making over the dated building with challenging space constraints into an inviting facility, but also 
creating innovative services that respond to the changing needs of the community. Proud of our 
accomplishments the past seven years, we submitted an application in November for the Library 
Journal's Best Small Library Award, co-sponsored by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and 
Library Journal. The award honors the public library that most profoundly demonstrates 
outstanding service to populations of 25,000 or less. Whether or not Wilmington Memorial Library is 
recognized with this national award, we will continue to implement forward thinking solutions that 
provide valued services and experiences in an inviting facility and connect Wilmington residents to 
their community and the world beyond. 



-52- 



LIBRARY STAFF 



Administration: 

Library Director - Christina A. Stewart 
Assistant Library Director - Charlotte Wood 
Administrative Assistant - Gloria Corcoran 

Children's Librarian - Barbara Raab 
Technology Librarian - Curtis Wyant 
Teen Services Librarian - Brandy Danner 

Assistant Adult Services Librarian - Marissa Szumowski 
Assistant Children's Librarian - Barbara Michaud 
Assistant Technical Services Librarian - Linda Harris 
Circulation Librarian - Linda Pavluk 



Circulation Assistants - Ruth Ellen Donnelly and Karen Whitfield 
Technical Services Assistant - Diane DeFrancesco 



Library Assistants - Gayle Field, Desiree Maguire and Maureen Walsh 



Library Pages 

Michelle Barnes, Amanda Bonnette-Kim, Stephanie Canty, 

Britney Chin, Cassie Cushing, Elizabeth Harvey, 
Kaitlin Kinsella, Nicholas Michelangela and Maria Patron 




-53- 



LIBRARY STATISTICS FOR 2012 

Hours Open Weekly 

Winter 64 
Monday through Saturday 9-5 
Monday through Thursday evenings 5-9 

Summer 56 
Monday through Friday 9-5 
Monday through Thursday evenings 5-9 

Population 22,417 

Number New Patrons Registered 953 

Total Registered Borrowers 14,339 

Number of library visits 145,751 

Number of Items in Collection 55,512 

Items per capita 2.56 

Subscriptions 159 

Museum Passes 11 

Circulation 254,447 
Physical 236,300 
Digital 18,147 

Circulation per capita 11.4 

Interlibrary Loan 64,928 
To other libraries 26,311 
From other libraries 38,617 

Information Services 

Information Desk Transactions 4,992 

Internet Sessions 22,137 

Email Newsletter Subscriptions 2,385 

Website Hits 304,858 

Conference Room Use 748 
Library 524 
Community 224 

Library Programs 498 

Children's Programs 287 
Teen Programs 67 

Adult Programs 144 

Total attendance at programs 11,243 

Children's Programs 8,183 

Teen Programs 1,151 

Adult Programs 1,909 



-54- 



Wilmington Arts Council 



The Wilmington Arts Council, also known as the Wilmington Cultural Council, is unique in the state 
of Massachusetts in that it is the only council which has the use of a town-owned building, the 
Wilmington Arts Center. No other town in Massachusetts has an art center quite like ours. Last 
year, the Arts Council received $3,840 from the Massachusetts Cultural Council to be used in 2012. 
Programs approved by the Wilmington Arts Council included passes for the Museum of Fine Arts 
and the Isabella Stuart Gardner Museum for the library. Two other programs were approved for the 
library, a very popular class in using pastels and a new program called the "Ecology of Sound" for 
children. The Delvena Theatre Co. will be performing "Meet Julia Child" at the Wilmington Senior 
Center. The nursing homes in Wilmington will have two singers performing their programs, Diane 
Dexter and Denise Doucette, for a total of 11 performances. These programs are very welcomed at 
the homes. Contempaissance will perform with flute and guitar at the Annual Art Show put on at 
the Wilmington Arts Center. The New Repertory Theater will present "To Kill a Mocking Bird" at 
the Wilmington High School. All these programs are paid for, or partially paid for, by the 
Wilmington Arts Council. 

Many residents in Wilmington know the story of the group of women that joined together with their 
interest in the "arts" to acquire the use of the old Town Hall on Middlesex Avenue. Their request 
was approved by the Town Meeting in 1986. Before that, an outdoor art show was held on the 
Wilmington Common for several years on the Fourth of July. When approval was given to be able to 
use the old Town Hall, this group of women: Edith Michaelson, H. Elizabeth "Liz" White, Anne 
Buzzell, Marguerite Elia, Adele C. Passmore, Antoinette Campbell and one man, Daniel H. Ballou, 
Sr. were able to come in from the rain! They started working! (I am very sorry if I left someone off 
this list.) 

Money was donated, tables and chairs were purchased, a new carpet for the conference room was 
installed, new hanging devices were put in place, and I am sure there were others necessities 
acquired such as paint! The old Town Hall was transformed into the Wilmington Arts Center. Over 
the years, the annual art show moved indoors out of the weather. I am happy to say that our art 
show is now 31 years old! We now have three incredible teachers. They teach watercolor, oil 
painting and mixed media. Two wonderful groups use the building to rehearse, the Middlesex Valley 
Chorus and the Stewart Highland Bagpipers. Both groups are based in Wilmington. These groups 
also watch out for the building and notify the council if there is a problem that must be fixed right 
away, such as the heating system. The Sweet Adelines chorus has offered to help us purchase a new 
rug for the conference room. 

Our highlights of the year were several partnerships which occurred by chance and some hard work. 
In April, the Arts Council was thrilled to have two art shows featuring the Wilmington High School 
and the Wilmington Elementary Schools. The students were thrilled to have their artwork on 
display "in a gallery"! It was viewed by parents, family and friends. Several months later, a 
Brownie troop from Wilmington showed their "stuff'! The Arts Council is very pleased to have 
groups from Wilmington using the arts center! We are hoping that this trend will continue. Right 
now, we are working on an exhibit of "Art Quilts" to be seen in the spring! "Art Quilts" are a fast 
growing art form and visitors will be amazed at their diversity. We are also hoping for more 
Wilmington student shows. 

Our other partnership happened with the Wilmington Memorial Library. We have been attending 
the "Community Fair" for several years and have met and talked to many new people. This year the 
Council was able to help out the library with their "Pastel Painting" program with Greg Maichack 
last fall. We helped with the application and judged the show, which was very difficult as there were 
so many wonderful paintings in the show. We are hoping this will become an annual event! 

Some new purchases were made this year, including new comfortable chairs for the conference room. 
New light weight tables were purchased for the drawing and painting classes. One person can now 
handle the job of setting up one table. One of our special purchases over the years is our grand piano 
which is used regularly for piano recitals. The hall is then filled with music, parents, sisters, 
brothers and grandparents from Wilmington and the surrounding towns. All in all, the Council feels 
that the Wilmington Arts Center is thriving in Wilmington! 



-55- 



Sarah D. J. Carter Lecture Fund Committee 

Fondly nicknamed by its newest committee member the "A-Team", Ann, Ann, Andrea and Adele 
(along with Julia) once more teamed up to present a fun and informative evening of entertainment 
for Wilmington residents in the fall of 2012. 

Friday, October 26th, at the Middle School Auditorium, a hundred or so people gathered to enjoy a 
local band, The Jolly Rogues. Featuring Jim Murray, Paul Harty, Al Hicks and Peg Hicks, the group 
celebrated their tenth anniversary by sharing songs, history of folk music and stories of folks they've 
met. Their recent performances in China, England and Germany and throughout New England have 
given them anecdotes (and antics!) for thought and laughter. 

Although Sarah D. J. Carter is a town committee with appointed members, all of its funding comes 
from an endowment bequeathed to the Town of Wilmington in 1907. Decreases in endowment 
earnings, coupled with increases in expenses, have reduced the number of events to one per year. 
Committee members work harder than ever to find quality, affordable musicians and historians and 
many perform for a reduced fee. There is never a ticket charge, as requested by the donor, but 
performers sell copies of their music at the event to offset their own expenses. 

The planning for our 2013 show is underway and is usually scheduled for late October. More 
information will be available as we roll into fall! 

Committee Members: Adele Passmore, Chairman, Ann Berghaus, Ann St. Onge, Andrea Houser and 
Julia Doten 




Committee Members from left: Adele Passmore, Andrea Houser, Ann Berghaus, Ann St. Onge 
and Julia Doten with members of The Jolly Rogues 



-56- 




The Wilmington Historical Commission continues to embrace its mission of conservation, 
preservation and education, with the goal of making our citizens aware of the Town's rich historical 
heritage and the value of preserving our historic buildings and sites. 

As 2012 drew to a close, the current phase of rehabilitation work at the William Butters II 
Farmhouse neared completion. The Historical Commission is proud of the conservation work that 
has been done on the exterior of the building and is pleased that it has been preserved for 
generations to come. Much rehabilitation work remains to be done on the interior of the building 
and the Commission continues to explore options for the future preservation and use of this 
important historic structure. 




TOWN POUND GATE 

Dedicated to the mernory 

MILTON L. BRADFORD 

A Citizen 
(1957 - 2008) 



^1 



In 2012, the Historical Commission had 
the honor of dedicating the gate installed 
at the rebuilt Town Pound on Middlesex 
Avenue, adjacent to the Old Burial 
Ground. The installation of this gate was 
thanks to the tireless efforts of resident 
Marion Bradford who dedicated the gate 
to the memory of her husband, Milton 
Bradford. With the dedication of this 
gate, the rebuilding of Wilmington's 
historic Town Pound is now complete. 
The Historical Commission is extremely 
grateful to Mrs. Bradford, as well as to 
former Wilmington resident Warren 
Newhouse, who reconstructed the Town 
Pound several years ago, and current 
resident, Ken Demaggio, who worked 
with Mrs. Bradford to envision, construct 
and install the gate. Through their efforts another historic landmark has been preserved for future 
generations. 




Another positive development for local historic preservation was the Town's collaboration with 
Historic New England to manage preservation restrictions on the now privately owned Boutell- 
Hathorn House (a/k/a the Richardson Estate), a beautiful residential property with deep roots in 
Wilmington's past, built in the early eighteenth century and listed on the National Register of 
Historic Places. Historic New England is an organization that "aims to preserve, interpret and 
collect buildings, landscapes and objects reflecting New England life from the 17th century to the 
present" (www.historicnewengland.org) and the Commission was very fortunate to have been able to 
develop a working relationship with them as a consequence of the sale of the Boutell-Hathorn House, 
a property upon which both Historic New 
England and the Wilmington Historical 
Commission hold preservation restrictions. 



William Butters II Farmhouse 




-57- 



Eagle Scout candidates continue to work with the Historical Commission on projects that assist in 
the mission of historic preservation and presentation of historic assets. In 2012 Boy Scouts from 
Troop 56 completed Eagle Scout projects that the Commission was proud to sponsor. Adam Maienza 
created a walking trail on the property at the Harnden Tavern (Town Museum) and Patrick 
MacCorkle did landscaping work at the Butters Farmhouse designed to restore the Farmhouse to 
some of its past glory. The Commission is very grateful for the work done by these boys and their 
troops to enhance historic landmarks in our town. 

The Commission was also delighted to participate in the Women of Wilmington's second Festival of 
Trees by donating a historical themed gift basket to be used in the fundraiser. Also during the 
holiday season, the Commission decorated the Scaleskeeper's House, the West Schoolhouse and the 
Butters Farmhouse with holiday wreaths. Members of the Commission enjoyed attending the 
annual Holiday Social presented by volunteers at the Town Museum. 

Memberships in historic preservation organizations were renewed. Memberships include Historic 
New England, Preservation MASS, the American Association for State and Local History, the New 
England Museum Association, the American Alliance of Museums and the Woburn Historical 

Society. 

The activities and programs of the Wilmington Town Museum at the Harnden Tavern are an 
important priority of the Wilmington Historical Commission. The Commission is pleased to work 
closely with Museum Curator Terry McDermott in her efforts to make historical presentations at the 
Museum as well as at other sites for organizations interested in local history. The Museum has 
become a vital part of our community and the Commission has watched with pride as citizens of the 
town have come to value its programs and resources. The Commission is particularly proud of the 
Museum's collaboration with the Wilmington Public School system, the centerpiece of which is the 
annual field trip of Wilmington Kindergarten students to the Town Museum. 

The year 2012 saw some changes in the membership of the Wilmington Historical Commission. The 
Commission was pleased to welcome new members Diane Harvey and Kim Nguyen to the 
Commission and look forward to working with them in the future. The Commission regretfully 
accepted the resignations of Bill Campbell and Julie Fennell, both of whom made significant 
contributions while on the Commission. The Commission also accepted the resignation of Ann 
Berghaus as clerk of the Commission. Ann Berghaus served as clerk of the Commission for 27 years 
and her efforts on behalf of the Commission and historical preservation in the town of Wilmington 
are too numerous to list. She will be truly missed as she begins a very well deserved retirement. 

The Wilmington Historical Commission would like to thank the volunteers who put in their time and 
effort to help the Museum flourish. Special contributors are Adele Passmore, who has supported the 
Museum and town history for over 40 years, and Steve Berghaus, who continues to make the 
Carriage House at the Museum a very special destination. Other important contributors to the 
Museum include the Garden Club and the Wilmington Company of Minutemen, as well as individual 
volunteers who participate in programs such as the Holiday Social or the Kindergarten's visit to the 
Museum. A heartfelt thank you is also extended to town administration as well as to various town 
departments that support the Commission's work. Especially the Public Works Department and 
Public Buildings Department, whose work helps to maintain the Harnden Tavern and other historic 
assets of the town. 

The Wilmington Historical Commission meets on the second Monday of the month at Town Hall and 
the Wilmington Town Museum. 



-58- 



Col. Joshua Hareden Tavern and Wilmington Town Museum 



Located at the site of the historic Col. Joshua Harnden Tavern, the Wilmington Town Museum is 
proud to work with the Wilmington Historical Commission to "preserve and present... our 
community's history." In the past year the Town Museum has brought to its citizens the following 
programs, exhibits and events: 



April - Kindergarten comes to the Town Museum! 

Students from the Boutwell and Wildwood Early Childhood Centers visited the 
Museum for a day of touring, crafts and games. 

Egg Cups and Other Curiosities Exhibit 

An exhibit created by Adele Passmore featuring collectible egg cups and other rare 
tableware opened in April. Many of the pieces in this exhibit were on loan from 
Charlotte Stewart, Jean Webster, Adele Passmore or donated by Dora Ardolino and 
the late Dora Hirtle. 



June 



July & 
August 



September 



Stories from the Old Houses of Wilmington, Mass. 
On the Road - AIM (Access is Mandatory) meeting 

This presentation featuring photos and stories about some of Wilmington's most 
prominent historic houses was featured at an AIM meeting at the Wilmington 
Knights of Columbus building. 

Flag Day 

The Wilmington Company of Minutemen conducted their annual Flag Retirement 
Ceremony while the Museum and Carriage House were open for tours. 

Brown Bag Lunch and Games 

Guests were invited on Fridays throughout the summer to eat lunch on the lawn of 
the Tavern, overlooking the herb garden, followed by simple games and crafts for 
children. As always, cup and ball and the game of graces were among the many old 
fashioned activities available to visitors on these days; new activities added were the 
making of friendship bracelets and gimp crafts. 

Wilmington Farmers Market 

On the Road - Across from Wilmington's Town Common 

The Wilmington Farmers Market Association invited the Museum to participate in 
the second year of the Farmers Market, allowing us the opportunity to sit at the 
history table in July and the Community Table in August. 

Community Fair- 
On the Road - Across from Wilmington's Town Common 

The Wilmington Memorial Library presented their third annual Community Fair and 
the Museum was pleased to be invited to participate in this event with other 
community and civic organizations. 



November- Veterans' Day Exhibit 

The Museum was proud to present an exhibit of veterans' memorabilia at the Town 
Museum during the month of November in honor of Veterans' Day. 

Stories from the Old Houses of Wilmington, Mass. 
On the Road - Wilmington Garden Club meeting 

This presentation featuring photos and stories about some of Wilmington's most 
prominent historic houses was featured at the Garden Club's monthly meeting. 



-59- 



December - Annual Holiday Social 

The Town Museum always marks the beginning of the winter holiday season with 
the presentation of the annual Holiday Social and this year was no exception. 
Volunteers at the Museum, assisted by the Wilmington Garden Club, created a 
festive atmosphere with holiday greenery, floral arrangements and other decor and 
served delicious refreshments. Junior Girl Scout Troop 62002 entertained visitors 
with their singing and students from Wilmington High School assisted our younger 
visitors at the Children's Craft Table. 




A fabulous addition to the activities offered at the 
Museum was provided by Eagle Scout Adam Maienza and 
Boy Scout Troop 56. They created a walking trail through 
the woods on the grounds of the Museum. The troop took 
an area of the property that was sadly underutilized and 
created a walk through the woods for Museum visitors, 
who wish to spend more time enjoying the outdoors. This 
trail has already been enjoyed by many Museum visitors 
and we are very grateful that Adam chose work on the 
Museum grounds for his Eagle Scout project. 



Adam Maienza organized the creation of a 
walking trail for his Eagle Scout project 



The year also brought some important repair work to the 
Carriage House building at the Harnden Tavern. Five of 
the building's original windows were restored and the 
rotted parts of the wood gutter at the front of the building replaced. It is hoped that funding to 
restore the remaining eight windows of this building can be procured in the coming year, so that the 
building and its artifacts will be properly protected from the elements. 

Junior Girl Scout Troop 62002, under the direction 
of leaders Lisa Ward and Debbie Consorti, returned 
for another year of caroling at the Museum during 
the annual Holiday Social. Once again they 
impressed all visitors, not only with their singing 
talent, but with period costumes which greatly 
added to the old fashioned holiday atmosphere that 
the Holiday Social always endeavors to create. The 
Museum welcomes all Boy and Girl Scout troops, 
who often come to the Museum for tours. We 
appreciate all the support the Scouts have given to 
the Museum over the years. 




The Museum is always honored to receive donations of historical artifacts from its citizens. Some of 
our donors this year included: Paul Curtin, Michael Caira, Jim Durkee, the Gearty Family, Dora 
Ardolino, Shirley Costain, William Patricia, John Walsh, Janice Ruggiero and Stephen Jeffrey. 
Thank you to all who donate, our Museum is enriched by your generosity! 

The Museum was also grateful for the donations of hop roots from Joseph Gibbons and Monique 
Jacobs. It is hoped that hop plants, an important part of Wilmington's agricultural past, can be 
grown at the Museum in future years. We thank these donors for their support of this project. 

Artifacts are wonderful and informative, but volunteers at the Museum are our greatest asset. In 
the past year we have been privileged to work with some special people: Adele Passmore, who 
creates exhibits that combine beauty with historical information; Steve Berghaus, who continues to 
work to make the Carriage House an important component of the Museum; as well as Marsha 
Agostino, Jane McGrath, Rosemary Crowley, Christine Nelson, Helen Durkee and Steve Leet, all of 
whom have supported the Museum for many years. The Wilmington Company of Minutemen can 
always be called upon to support Museum programs and the Museum enthusiastically supports all 



-60- 



the Minutemen do for the community. The same can be said of the Wilmington Garden Club, which 
has contributed for many years to the appearance of the grounds of the Harnden Tavern. New faces 
this year included high school volunteers Samantha Martignetti and Samantha Maclnnis who 
assisted with summer programs and at the Holiday Social and University of Massachusetts student 
Hillary Mahoney, who worked at the Museum as a summer intern and studied some of the 
Museum's textiles. Other high school students volunteered at the Museum as part of the high 
school's Community Service program. To all of these wonderful volunteers we say a hearty "thank 
you!" We truly could not offer the programs and services we have without you. 

We are indebted to all the Town departments that contribute to the Museum's success. The Public 
Buildings and Public Works Departments maintain the buildings and property at the Museum so 
that it can always be accessible and enjoyed by the public. The Museum continues to take part in 
the Senior Center's Tax Work-Off program, with this year's participants, Grace Carroll and Mary 
Rogers, assisting in many projects at the Museum. The Wilmington Public School Department 
continues to send students to the Museum. A particular highlight is the kindergarten students' visit 
to the Museum in the spring. The Wilmington Memorial Library is always an important partner of 
the Museum and this year that partnership was especially evident in the Wilmington Historical 
Coloring Book produced by the Friends of the Library. Museum Curator Terry McDermott was able 
to contribute in a joint effort with the Wilmington Memorial Library, Wilmington High School 
students and the Wilmington Town Museum, the collaboration produced this coloring book 
containing historical information pertaining to our Town which was particularly rewarding. 

Grateful for the support of these departments, and the Town Manager's Office, the Museum looks 
forward to working with the Historical Commission in presenting another year of programs that 
entertain and educate the community. 

The Town Museum continues to serve the serve the community, onsite and at other locations around 
town. Over 900 people of all ages visited the Town Museum in the past year. 



Winter Hours 



Functions 



Community Use 



Historical Commission 
Children's Programs 

Adult Programs 
Family Programs 



Tuesday & Thursday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
First Sunday of month, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. 

Wilmington Garden Club 
Hobday Parties 

Boy and Girl Scout Troops - Site Tours 
Students' Historical Research 

Senior Center - Senior Citizen Tax Work-Off Program 
Wilmington Garden Club 
Kindergarten Field Trip 

Monthly meetings 

Kindergarten Comes to the Town Museum! 
"Brown Bag Lunch & Games" summer program 
Scout Troop tours 

Historical Presentation to AIM 
Historical Presentation to Garden Club 
"Egg Cups and Other Curiosities" Exhibit 
Veterans' Day Exhibit 

Flag Day Activities 

"Brown Bag Lunch & Games" summer program 
Friends' Holiday Social 



-61- 




The Recreation Department's continuing goal is to offer high quality, relevant programs and services 
to the residents of Wilmington. The Recreation Department aims to provide solutions to new 
challenges faced by residents in evolving life situations. New residents can meet others, parents can 
find a wide variety of reasonably priced programs for their children to sample, "empty nesters" might 
take a class or enjoy theater or sporting event tickets and residents of all ages continue to reap the 
benefits of group travel and assorted fitness programs. The Recreation Department has been in full- 
time operation for 42 years. The Department is located in Room 8 at Town Hall. Office hours are 
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. 

The Recreation Commission, formed in 1953, acts in an advisory and policy making capacity. 
Volunteer members are: C. Michael Burns, Chairman; Sheila M. Burke, Vice-Chairman; Charles 
Biondo, Mark Kennedy and Laurie Robarge. Commissioners are active in various groups, 
committees and clubs throughout town. 

The Recreation Office staff remains small, with only two full-time employees (Director Deborah 
Cipriani and Senior Clerk Linda Kanter) and one part-time staff (Program Coordinator Karen 
Campbell). In addition, there are over 100 part-time and seasonal employees and over 250 
volunteers who help to run the department's programs. The Department offers, on a year-round 
basis, an ever-changing slate of activities for residents of all ages. While the office is open Monday 
through Friday, recreation programs are scheduled virtually every day of the week and into the 
evening hours. 



A primary objective of the Recreation Department is to offer a wide variety of quality programs that 
are as affordable as possible. Registration fees remain low, especially in comparison to other towns 
or organizations. The Department is funded by a variety of sources. The Town-appropriated budget 
provides for a full-time director and clerk as well as some limited supplies and staff training costs. 
Program fees fund the position of the program coordinator. A combination of program fees and 
donations heavily supplement the town-funded budget. We strive to keep fees and costs low by 
utilizing cost-saving methods including the bid process, fund-raising and in-kind services. We 
continue to search for innovative ways to generate funds to offset costs for the recreation consumer. 

Volunteers are critical to the success of Recreation programs. 

Volunteers might find themselves spreading out candy for the 

Annual Easter Egg Hunt, coaching a T-Ball or Basketball team or 

serving breakfast to Santa, resident children and their families. 

We greatly appreciate our residents who give so generously of 

their time and most report that they also gain on personal levels 

by volunteering. We receive generous donations from local 

businesses and organizations. Some of these valuable 

contributors in 2012 include: Century 21 (Starwood), Dunkin' 

Donuts of 321 Main Street, Dunkin' Donuts of 195 Main Street, 

Everett Lodge IOOF (Odd Fellows), Kiwanis, Learning 

Experience, Lowell 5^ Savings Bank, Lucci's, Market Basket, 

ReMax Encore Real Estate, Representative James Miceli, 

Shriners, Sons of Italy, Tewksbury /Wilmington Elks, TriFury 

Triathlon Club, Utz Quality Foods, Inc., Walgreens, Wilmington 

Arts Council, Wilmington Chamber of Commerce, Wilmington 

Community Fund, Wilmington Fire Department, Wilmington 4 Ih 

of July Committee, Wilmington Patch, Wilmington Police 

m „ „ , Department and The Wonder Years Learning Center. 

The Easter Bunny takes time for 

pictures at the annual Easter Egg Hunt The R ecreat i on Department continues to improve and augment 

our program offerings to meet the ever-increasing demands for 
classes, activities, entertainment and travel experiences. We actively solicit suggestions for future 
offerings and encourage our talented residents to consider teaching a class. Some new classes in 




J: 
fk 



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2012 that were well received included Lego Engineering and Lego Robotics, cooking classes 
(including sessions for cookies, pies, pasta and a week long "Summer Sizzle" class) and even two 
"Cupcake Challenges". The Department strives to meet the increased demand for children's 
programs by expanding the scope and number of these programs. Our holiday and seasonal 
celebrations enhance the sense of community and identify Wilmington as a unique town. They 
include the Easter Egg Hunt, Fishing Derby, Concerts on the Common, Horribles Parade, Santa's 
Workshop and our own Breakfast with Santa. 




Participants are ready to build in the Recreation Department's Lego Class 



A mainstay of the Recreation Department is our sports leagues and programs. We consistently 
register hundreds of children each year for Jr. and Recreation Basketball Leagues. In an attempt to 
maximize the quality of our basketball leagues, we offer both referee and coach clinics. We also have 
additional supervised basketball programs for teenagers to play "pick-up" in a setting less structured 
than a league and instructional basketball for four and five year olds. Other recurring and 
tremendously popular programs include: "The Rookies" T-Ball, Kinder Soccer, Volleyball and 35+ 
Basketball. Recognizing the benefits of physical activity, we have introduced new offerings this year 
that promote health and wellness including Yoga-Play, Tennis for Special Needs Children and TRX 
Fitness. 

Summer is extremely busy for the Department as we offer a multitude of programs for families and 
residents. The Playground and Tiny Tots programs offer summertime recreation and socialization 
for Wilmington children. Other offerings include an opportunity to try something there is no time for 
during the school year. Some examples from this past summer include two basketball leagues that 
play outdoors under the lights in the evening, pottery classes, sailing and kayaking lessons on the 
Charles River in Boston, golf and tennis lessons and several sports clinics. We offered a variety of 
trips in the summer including a day trip to cruise amongst the Tall Ships when they were in Boston 
Harbor, another to experience the Providence WaterFire and a trip to see the sights in Provincetown, 
complete with dune buggy rides. In addition, the Recreation Department is responsible for the 
oversight of the Silver Lake beaches. 

We continue to offer movie and event tickets at reduced rates and we are also able to secure tickets 
to "difficult to come by" events such as the Red Sox, Lowell Spinners, Bruins, Celtics and Disney on 
Ice productions. We offer tickets to local theater productions for shows ranging from "The Holiday 
Pops with Keith Lockhart" at the Lowell Auditorium to "Billy Elliot" at the Opera House, "Blue Man 
Group" at the Charles Playhouse, "The Grinch Who Stole Christmas" at the Wang Theatre and 
"Love, Sex and the IRS!" at the Newport Playhouse. Many residents turn to our quarterly flyer 
when making decisions for their entertainment options. We offer great gift possibilities including 
discounted movie tickets and gift certificates that may be redeemed for any of our programs or trips. 
Increasing numbers of residents are choosing to give the gift of travel and recreation programs, 
providing enhanced life experiences for their family and friends. 



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Our trips continue to grow in popularity as residents enjoy round trip transportation to and from 
Wilmington, reasonable prices and the ease of having a pre-planned itinerary. Perennial favorite 
day trips include New York City in May, October and December and monthly trips to Foxwoods 
Casino. New trips that were thoroughly enjoyed included "Spectacular Newport", "Frank and Dean, 
Home for the Holidays", "Kings of Country and Mohegan Sun" and "Christmas Memories". During 
the summer, children enrolled in the Playground and Tiny Tots programs could participate in many 
age appropriate field trip excursions. We offer frequent theatre trips so that residents can easily 
purchase tickets to current offerings in Boston that include bus transportation, thus avoiding both 
parking and traffic hassles. In 2012 our overnight trips included: a Casino Escape to the 
Connecticut Casinos, a St. Patrick's Celebration at the Irish Village on Cape Cod, a "Lobster Fest" at 
the Beacon Resort, a Grand Tour of Ireland, a trip to Branson, Missouri, trips to Saratoga Springs 
and the Turning Stone Resort in New York State, an overnight trip to New York City and a trip to 
the Common Man Inn in New Hampshire. 



In an attempt to be as accommodating as 
possible, most Recreation programs can be 
registered for by mail or by drop-off in the 
Town Hall night slot. Our newsletter and 
many required registration forms are 
available on-line through the Town website, 
by accessing Recreation, followed by the link 
for "Recreation Matters". Our newsletters are 
also available in Town Hall, the Wilmington 
Memorial Library and the Buzzell Senior 
Center. One of the most common 
requirements of the Recreation staff is to act 
as an information source. We answer a wide 
variety and large number of questions daily 
about local and regional services. 

The U. S. S. Constitution was among the many tall ships. Wilmington is a suburban community, 

considered a "well located town" with easy 
access to major roads, parks and beaches, 
sporting events, theatre, arts and museums. Today's recreation consumer is searching for 
opportunities to access all of these area attractions, as well as local activities. The Recreation 
Department allows people to choose a new sport or science club, learn a new skill, socialize with 
fellow residents and enjoy recreation at a convenient location and at a reasonable price. These 
dynamics stress the importance of town support for the Recreation Department. The positive 
feedback and generous donations we receive are evidence of the appreciation of local residents and 
businesses for the Recreation Department. We are an ever-changing environment and a solution to 
the continual changing needs of our residents. The Recreation Department's ability to adapt and our 
commitment to provide quality service is a trademark that we stand by. 




The Department of Elderly Services seeks to maintain the highest quality of services and programs 
for its 4,324 elderly residents, a 37.9% increase since 2000 and a 7% increase in one year. The 
Department of Elderly Services is located at the Buzzell Senior Center. The center is designed to 
meet the challenges of a changing environment because it reflects and responds to the needs of the 
Wilmington community in which we serve. The center is a place where older adults can come 
together for services and activities that compliment their experience and skills, respond to their 
diverse needs and interests, enhance their dignity, support their independence and encourage their 
involvement in and with the center and the community. The center also offers helpful resources to 
older adults; we serve the entire community with information on aging, support for family 
caregivers, training professionals, lay leaders and students and developments of innovative 
approaches to addressing aging issues. 




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In 2012, the Department was very fortunate to be the recipient of $12,000.00 from the Lahey Clinic 
Community Benefits Grant. With these funds the department was able to provide: 

• Country Line Dancing - weekly 

• Low Impact Aerobics Class - twice weekly 

Certified Aerobics Instructor 

• Brain Yoga (3) six week sessions 

Certified yoga teacher designed this class especially for seniors to train their mind 
and body to work together. 

• "SBF"( Strength, Balance and Flexibility) - twice weekly 

Certified Aerobics instructor 

As a result from this grant, all of these programs have incurred a large increase in attendance. 
Elders have stated how it has helped lower their blood pressure and increase their ability to walk 
longer distances. The Department has also been very privileged to be the recipient for the eighth 
year of the Lahey Clinic Community Benefits Grant that further complimented the evidence-based 
programs. Through this free program offered by Lahey Clinic Community Benefits Program, we 
were able to offer an eight week Arthritis Self-Management Program and a six week Diabetes Self 
Management Program. By offering these evidence-based programs, the Senior Center has made a 
real impact on elders' health by teaching them to eat better, exercise more, reduce pain and manage 
chronic disease. 

There were over 16,000 elderly visitors this year who participated in the Buzzell Senior Center 
programs such as: Socializing, Exercise Classes, Country Line Dance Classes, Ceramic Classes, 
Nutrition Classes, Computer Classes, Arts & Crafts, Fun Singers Group, Men's Group, Quilting 
Group, Billiards, Wii, Bocce, Wood Carving, Card Playing and Acrylic Painting Class (who had their 
first Art Show at the center on June 12, 2012). Over 80% of these classes are led by volunteers who 
are dedicated elders who graciously give their time and energy. 

The funds that the Department receives from the Executive Office of Elder Affairs ($21,952.00) 
support a part-time (20 hours a week) Outreach Worker, part-time clerk (10 hours a week) and part- 
time (10 hours a week) Program Coordinator. The monies, in part, also support the mailing and 
printing of our monthly newsletter, the "Buzzell Buzz." This comprehensive and entertaining 
newsletter is written and edited by a wonderful group of volunteers. Without their time and 
dedication this newsletter would not be possible. The "Buzzell Buzz" not only provides information 
about activities and great photos of the Buzzell Senior Center but also assistance programs which 
include: prescription programs, Senior Tax Work-Off Program, Fuel Assistance program, food 
stamps, Medicaid applications, RIDE applications and fun programming at the center that are 
available to the elders in the community. The newsletter can be found at the Buzzell Senior Center, 
the Town Manager's Office and the Wilmington Memorial Library. 

The Town of Wilmington provides many daily services through the Department of Elderly Services. 
A free service that is rarely found in the surrounding Massachusetts area is transportation for 
Wilmington residents age 60 and over. Transportation is provided within a thirteen-mile radius of 
Wilmington and we have a full-time van driver to meet their transportation needs. We are fortunate 
to have a van that is also equipped to handle a wheelchair along with its passengers. We are able to 
transport elders to, including, but not limited to, medical appointments, shopping and to the Buzzell 
Senior Center. The van continues to be a vital service to the elders of Wilmington. There were over 
20,000 miles traveled to accommodate the elders in 2012. 

For the year 2012, the need for social service was on the rise: fuel assistance, health insurance 
issues, credit card fraud, filing property tax abatements and deferrals, prescription costs 
(Prescription Advantage Program), protective service issues (elder abuse) and including the age 
bracket of 50-59 that are often ineligible for government programs. With this growing need, the 
Department continues to find themselves on the frontline of providing services and referrals. This, 
in turn, has increased the amount of home visits by the Director, Outreach Worker and Case 
Manager in order to meet the needs of the most critical cases. Our full-time Case Manager further 
compliments the Department, services provided include but are not limited to: conducting home 
visits, family consults and providing referrals to outside agencies. Through this position, the 



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Department strives to make elders accessible to an integrated selection of health and social support 
programs. We support families in their efforts to care for loved ones at home and in the community 
and maintain services that ensure older residents are protected from personal exploitation, neglect 
and abuse. This, in turn, continues to strengthen the one-on-one connection between the elder and 
staff throughout the community. The Case Manager, along with the Director, has started a Men's 
Breakfast Group, which meets bi-monthly with great success. The Case Manager position is a vital 
role for the community as a whole. Another way the Department did further outreach was through 
our Telephone Reassurance Program. With the assistance of our part-time Outreach Worker, she 
was able to make weekly calls to our most critical homebound elders and home visits when needed. 
This type of communication not only keeps the Department connected in case of emergency but 
develops a bond of trust between our workers and elders. 

The Department of Elderly Services continues to serve our home delivered meals program. This 
program provides the homebound elders of Wilmington with one hot meal five days a week, for the 
minimal cost of $2.00 a meal. There are approximately 65 - 80 meals delivered daily, Monday 
through Friday, to the elders of Wilmington. Elders not only rely on these meals, but also the daily 
contact. The drivers are responsible to return to the Senior Center after their deliveries to give an 
update on the elders they visited. The elders and their families are assured that if there should be a 
problem during the time of the delivery, the elder will be assisted and the families will be notified. 
Overall, the home delivered meals program is a crucial part of the Department's services. For the 
fiscal year 2012, the Department delivered 12,135 meals to 136 homebound elders (unduplicated) 
making it a 5.5% increase from last year. 

Another one of our continuing specialty programs is the "Medical Equipment Lending Program," a 
service that has increased in demand. Elders and their families can borrow equipment in order to 
stay home safely and assist in deferring the cost of such equipment. We offer wheelchairs, walkers, 
canes, bath chairs, benches and commodes. During the year 2012, we provided approximately 76 
medical pieces of equipment to elders in our community. We continue to receive calls from elders 
and their families as well as from the local Visiting Nurses' Association who assist Wilmington 
residents. We continue to be fortunate to offer electric wheelchairs, scooters and electric recliners as 
part of this lending program. Another specialty program is our new handyman service. Bob Regan 
has volunteered to assist elders with small odd jobs within their homes. This could include changing 
light bulbs, replacing mailboxes, connecting TVs and installing a doorbell just to name a few. It has 
been a great addition to the Department and many are extremely appreciative for his free service (all 
referrals go directly through director). 

Other monthly services include the Podiatrist, SHINE coordinators (Serving the Health Information 
Needs of Elders), Marilyn Penny, Charlotte Stewart and Shirley Estrella, Shear Pleasure (hair 
stylist) and weekly Blood Pressure Clinics by the Town Nurse. Annually, volunteer accountants 
from VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program), beginning the first week of February 
through the second week of April, assisted 79 Wilmington elders with their income taxes at the 
Wilmington Town Hall Auditorium. For 2012, there were 185 elders served through this program 
and several of them were able to receive additional refunds due to the "Circuit Breaker" tax break. 

Numerous studies have shown the benefits of intergenerational relationships not only for younger 
generations, but also for older adults. Elders who are involved in intergenerational activities often 
feel happier than those who do not participate. Some studies also suggested that increasing 
physical, cognitive and social activity through intergenerational programs might help improve health 
for an aging population and improve educational learning for children. Other research findings 
indicate that participation in intergenerational interactions have been positive and enjoyable 
experiences for older adults and improved their self-image. The Department of Elderly Services and 
the Wilmington School Department have been successful in developing strong intergenerational 
programs. This has proven true within our own community. 

One Wilmington High School student organization that has participated at the center is Rotary 
Interact, led by Jack Cushing. Over 30 students from this organization assisted in making our 
"Valentines Day Celebration" an outstanding success. They served 100 elders "Harrow's Pot Pie" 
lunch and fresh homemade desserts. Then in the summer of 2012, the students decided to take on 
the project of getting the center a bocce court. With their drive and enthusiasm, and the assistance 



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of Town Manager Michael Caira and the Department of Public Works, we now have an official bocce 
court. On August 2, 2012 we had our first official game opening. Everyone has been so happy, teams 
have been developed and tournaments played. In addition, we were extremely fortunate to have the 
Son's of Italy donate two benches to further enhance the use of the bocce court. Again in November 
2012, over 65 students raked 12 elderly resident's yards. The elders were extremely appreciative for 
a much needed service. 

Other Wilmington High School groups who continue to be involved at the Buzzell Senior Center 
include the Wilmington High School Medical Career Group led by Sue Rowe, High School Nurse and 
WHS Club led by Lisa Desberg, Wilmington High School English Department. In November, they 
organized our Gingerbread House Competition and a holiday performance on Wednesday, November 
28, 2012. The Wilmington High School hosted a "Strings Attached" performance orchestrated by 
Ward Dilmore and the Wilmington Music Department at the Wilmington High School Auditorium. 
Elders were able to enjoy a wonderful, live performance from the students as well as by the 
Wilmington High School Chorus led by Wilmington High School Music/Drama Director, Jason 
Luciana. The performance was followed by refreshments provided by Wilmington High School 
Medical Career Group and WHS Club. 

This year we have started a wonderful program with the TAPS (The Alternative Program for 
Students) led by teacher, Ms. DeMilde from Wilmington High School. These students visited the 
center on a monthly basis providing a lunch the students prepared followed by a variety of craft and 
interactive activities. It was a wonderful, successful program. Relationships were made and more 
respect for each generation was developed. Due to the success, we are in the process of making 
arrangements for the start of the next school year. 

Lastly, we had a student from Wilmington High School, Peter Warren, who volunteered his services 
as part of his Eagle Scout Project to reorganize our outdoor storage Pod of vital medical equipment 
and do the same for our basement that needed further storage. He directed a group of his Boy Scout 
peers in accomplishing this goal over a February weekend. The completion of this project has been 
so helpful to the Department in so many ways and he has certainly left his legacy here at the Buzzell 
Senior Center. 

The Department tries to give back to the students of our community through the Wilmington High 
School Scholarship Fund. On Friday, June 1, 2012, the Department of Elderly Services was able to 
award three scholarships; this year's recipients' were Kristen Dankese, Patrick Giroux and Eric 
Surette all from Wilmington High School. These students were outstanding volunteers to the 
Department and to the Town of Wilmington; the Department congratulates them and wishes them 
well in their future endeavors. 

The Department also likes to be able to give back to the community as a whole. This year, our team, 
the "Buzzell Bees" participated in the "Walk to End Alzheimer's" on Sunday, September 23, 2012, 
Greater Boston Walk at the Charles River in Cambridge. We were able to raise $1,273.00 in 
donations for the Alzheimer's Association. 

The Giving Tree this year was a huge success. We would like to thank the many residents that 
participated in our annual Giving Tree event and to Boy Scout Troop 56 for their continued support. 
This program would not have been possible without all the outpouring of generosity from the 
Wilmington residents, the Methodist Church, Kiwanis Club, other local organizations and 
surrounding towns. There were over 250 recipients who were overjoyed with appreciation. Thank 
you for making these annual programs such a wonderful accomplishment! 

The year 2012 was a great year for strong volunteer leadership with the Elderly Commissioners: 
Mary D'Eon, Chairperson; Gayle Regan, Vice Chairperson; Stanley Dancewicz, John King, Mary 
Smith, Frank Sferrazza and John Wallace. They have continued to work very hard in accomplishing 
their mission, as they work closely with the Director in meeting the needs of the elders of 
Wilmington. 

We would like to extend our thanks to our 85 dedicated volunteers who were "appreciated" at the 
annual Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon on May 24, 2012. "Volunteers are the Strength and Heart 
of Wilmington". This year we had a breakfast at the Hillview Country Club in North Reading, 



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honoring Joey Tavenese, Wilmington Middle School, who volunteered and introduced to the center 
the Wii and Al LaValle, Department Commissioner, for all of his dedicated services to the elders of 
Wilmington. 

We would also like to thank Morpho Detection, Inc. employees who assisted in our special 
homebound meals sponsored by the Wilmington Department of Elderly Services for 100 elders and is 
delivered in April, July and December. On St. Patrick's Day, a delicious homemade corned beef and 
cabbage luncheon generously sponsored by Peter MacLellan and cooked by Lou Cimaglia, over 100 
elders were able to join. We would like to thank the Kiwanis Organization for our Annual Summer 
Kick-off Dinner and Christmas Holiday Luncheon at the Buzzell Senior Center and the Friendship 
Lodge. All of these organizations have been extremely generous to our Department and we would 
like to thank them for their continued support. A special thanks to all the clubs and businesses who 
donated generously for raffles and give-a-ways. 

Finally, we would like to take this opportunity to thank the following for their generous donations in 
2012: Dunkin Donuts on Middlesex Avenue for their daily supply of donuts. Tewksbury/Wilmington 
Elks for their Thanksgiving Dinner Dance that served 194 seniors this year, Rotary for their 
monthly donations for financially strapped elders, the Rotary Interact Group and the Kiwanis Club. 
Also, to all the participants who volunteered at the 2012 Annual Holiday Crafts Fair making it a 
huge success!! The Fair Committee: Mary D'Eon, Helen Dentali and Gayle Regan did a superb job 
in coordinating the fair this year. There were a variety of prizes that were raffled and tables that 
offered an assortment of "crafted" items for purchase such as Christmas ornaments, Scrap booking, 
Jewelry treasures, baked goods and more! We would also like to thank the following companies who 
donated to this year's annual event: Lucci's Supermarket, Harrow's Pot Pies, Ninety Nine 
Restaurants, As Good As it Gets Cafe, Michael's Place, National Amusement, Cappelini's and 
Market Basket. All proceeds from this fair benefit the Department to help strengthen our programs 
and to develop new and innovative projects to serve our elders. 



The Wilmington Housing Authority (WHA) is authorized to administer two housing programs in 
accordance with Department of Housing & Community Development (DHCD) regulations for state- 
aided public housing and a small number of housing choice vouchers in accordance with the United 
States Housing and Urban Development Office of Public and Indian Housing (HUD) regulations 
(Federal Section 8 Certificate Program). The programs supply the Town with decent, safe and local 
affordable housing options. A five-member Board of Commissioners, consisting of four elected and 
one state appointed member, oversee the Authority's policies and procedures. The Executive 
Director is charged with the administration of these procedures. 

At the close of 2012, the Wilmington Housing Authority programs provided state-aided affordable 
housing to 123 residents. The Elderly/Handicapped housing (Chapter 667) is located on Deming 
Way and our family housing (Chapter 705) is scattered throughout the town. As always, the 
Authority gives a preference on the waiting list to local Wilmington residents. 

The Housing Authority has an approved five year capital plan with a total spending level of 
$227,298.00. The modernization program is moving forward at an unprecedented pace. The WHA 
has been fortunate in 2012 to be able to begin addressing the back log of capital needs. This has 
been an exciting time for the WHA and a busy time as we forged ahead with many projects. One fire 
alarm panel has been replaced that was damaged from a lightning storm. Per the direction of the 
Wilmington Fire Department radio boxes were installed as part of our fire alarm system. The 
maintenance shed has a new roof and garage door. We are also in the last phase of a reasonable 
accommodation project at one of our family housing units, which includes a handicapped accessible 
addition, ramp and several other upgrades to the house, including a new septic system and roof. We 
were fortunate that the DHCD was able to award the WHA a grant of $238,896.00 to be able to fulfill 
the reasonable accommodation request. Additionally, WHA is making plans to address the much 
needed paving needs at Deming Way, as well as repairs/upgrades for some of our family housing 
units in 2013. 




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Governor Patrick appointed a Commission this year for public housing sustainability and reform. 
The Commission issued a report of their findings on June 21, 2012. The Commission set forth 
recommendations that will result in legislation filed by the Governor early in 2013. The Commission 
Report does site the lack of financial support from the state and the constraints this has caused 
housing authorities to be understaffed and unable to address capital needs. However, the 
Commission is recommending regionalizing small housing authorities. The state's small housing 
authorities serve their local communities and tenants in a way that could not be replicated by a large 
central office that would be located miles away. The housing authorities that belong to 
Massachusetts Chapter of National Housing Authority and Redevelopment Organization are 
engaged in proposing an alternate plan that implements some of the changes the Commission has 
proposed while keeping our small housing authorities intact and local. The governance of housing 
authorities has not seen any reform or changes in decades, however, disempowering our local offices 
and Boards is not the solution to reform. There should be an opportunity to act on some of the 
proposed changes such as a centralized state waiting list, assistance with modernization and 
procurement and annual independent audits. The year 2013 could bring forward huge changes to 
state-aided public housing. 

The Authority did not require a financial subsidy from the DHCD to manage our programs. The 
WHA continues to monitor spending levels carefully. The state issued a 6.5% increase to our budget 
this fiscal year, which will help the WHA fund a few extraordinary maintenance projects. Our 
Section 8 Program administrative fee schedule has been reduced by HUD again this year. We are in 
the business of housing low income families, elderly and disabled community members and we 
continue to do this in spite of lack of adequate state and federal funding. 

We are grateful for the efforts of our Executive Director, Maureen Hickey, and our Administrative 
Housing Assistant, Denise Brown, who handle the day-to-day operations and ensure the programs 
run efficiently. We are fortunate to have a new maintenance man, Mr. Steve McDonald. Mr. 
McDonald is a knowledgeable and hard-working individual. Mr. McDonald stepped into his new 
position with enthusiasm and has been instrumental in our efforts to improve and take care of our 
properties. 

We welcomed our new Board Member, Mr. Gregory Bendel. Mr. Bendel is an asset serving on our 
Board learning very quickly the housing authority business. 

We are fortunate to have the expertise of Mr. Martin Robb as Housing Management Specialist, Ms. 
Linda Lamont as Project Manager and Mr. Robert Watt as Construction Advisor, all from the 
Department of Housing & Community Development. 

Our continued thanks for the ongoing support and professionalism provided by Town Hall, the 
Department of Public Works, Police Department, Fire Department and Elderly Services. We 
continue in our efforts to work cooperatively with the Town and all its departments with a goal of 
delivering comprehensive services to our tenants. 

We welcome your questions and comments. Please feel free to visit the Wilmington Housing 
Authority office located at 41 Deming Way, or contact us at 978-658-8531. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Board of Commissioners EXPIRATION OF TERM 

Stacie Murphy, Chairperson April 2017 

Robert DiPasquale, Vice-Chairman April 2013 

Leona Bombard, Treasurer April 2015 

Gregory Bendel April 2016 

State Appointee Vacant 



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The Department of Veterans' Services is responsible for the needs of all the veterans, and their 
dependents, residing in Wilmington. It is the Veterans' Service Officer (VSO) to whom the 
unemployed, the indigent, the disabled, the ill, or veterans otherwise in need first apply for 
assistance. The VSO interviews the applicants, determines their eligibility, and files requests for 
assistance. The VSO assists in filing for all veterans' benefits, including the Massachusetts program 
for indigent veterans and their dependents (Ch. 115). The Town of Wilmington receives 75% 
reimbursement from the State for funds expended by the Town in accordance with Ch. 115. The 
VSO also assists Wilmington veterans with applying for all other State benefits such as tuition 
waivers, grants, student loans, annuities, outreach centers, counseling, tax exemptions, 
Massachusetts cemeteries, employment, Veterans license plates, etc. 

Under the category of Federal Aid, veterans are assisted in processing applications for benefits 
including service-connected compensation, disability pensions, personal aid pensions, social security 
benefits, medical, education, housing, employment, medals, life insurance, death benefits and 
retrieval of military records for veterans who, without such documents, would not be eligible for any 
benefits. The Wilmington Dept. of Veterans' Services has assisted veterans in increasing the Federal 
benefits received through the Veterans Administration (VA) through compensation, pension and 
widow's pension. Over $2M a year is being paid to Wilmington veterans and their dependents from 
the Federal Government. 




The Department also works to coordinate public events 
such as Veterans Day and Memorial Day observances. 
This past Memorial Day and Veterans Day ceremonies 
were well attended by many Wilmington residents. 
This past December the Department of Veterans' 
Services assisted Gina Johnson in displaying her 
Christmas Tree of Remembrance. The tree was on 
display at Wilmington Common for the month of 
December. The tree had portraits, which she drew, of 
all the young men and women from the state of 
Massachusetts who have paid the ultimate sacrifice 
since September 11, 2001. There is also a memorial 
display of the portraits at the Veterans' Services office. 



Family member stands behind a veteran's cross . . , , ~. n^ T >^ • 

. , . , . , _ Louis Cimaglia, Director of Veterans Services tor the 

prior to Memorial Day ceremony Town of Wilmingtorl) also serves as the Graves 0fflcer 

He is responsible for the decoration of all veterans' graves in town on Memorial Day and to carry out 
commemorative activities related to Wilmington veterans. 

Board of Health 

The office of the Board of Health is located in the Town Hall at 121 Glen Road in Room 5 and the 
Public Health Nurse's office is located off of the foyer in the main entrance. The Board of Health 
consists of three members appointed by the Town Manager for staggered three-year terms. Serving 
on the Board in year 2012 were Elizabeth (Libby) Sabounjian, who served as the Chairman, James 
Ficociello, D.D.S. and Jane Williams, M.D. The Director of Public Health is Shelly Newhouse, R.S. 
The Town has the service of Mark Masiello as a Food Inspector. The Public Health Nurse is Tina 
Scanlon, R.N. The Animal Inspector is Ellen Sawyer. The secretary for the Board of Health is Kim 
Mytych. 

The administrative duties of the office include issuing permits, reviewing plans for subdivisions, 
septic systems and other development proposals, issuing enforcement orders and citations, holding 
hearings, keeping records, attending meetings, operation of the Board of Health website and other 
regular administrative duties. The Board of Health meetings were generally held twice monthly, on 
the first and third Tuesday of each month and usually at 5:30 p.m. Records of all meetings and other 
documents are kept at the office of the Board of Health. 

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Environmental field activities included inspection of restaurants, retail food stores, cafeterias in 
industrial buildings and schools, mobile food trucks, the Fourth of July caterers and other temporary 
food stands such as the Farmer's Market. The Farmer's Market was continued in 2012 and it 
brought in 12-15 vendors each Sunday at the Swain Green adjacent to the Fourth of July Building. 
Mostly food items were sold along with a few craft tables. This year the Board of Health issued 10 
new food establishment permits. Additional Board of Health responsibilities include percolation 
tests and soil evaluations, subsurface sewage disposal system inspections, recreational camp 
inspections, semi-public pool inspections, tanning salons, nuisance complaint investigations, 
hazardous waste investigations, housing inspections, smoking and tobacco law enforcement, lake 
water quality sampling, Canada Geese control, beaver control and other miscellaneous 
investigations and activities. West Nile Virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis plagued 
Massachusetts this year. West Nile Virus was confirmed in mosquitoes from Wilmington in late 
summer. The Town of Wilmington is part of the Central Massachusetts Mosquito Control Project 
which routinely provides preventative spraying and larvacide control throughout the town. 

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) announced that West Nile Virus (WNV) 
was detected in mosquitoes collected from Wilmington on August 7, 2012 in the Dublin Avenue 
wetland area. The specific type of mosquito tested was a Culiseta Melanura, which is primarily a 
bird-biter but will occasionally bite mammals (including humans). WNV is most commonly 
transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected mosquito. The mosquitoes that carry this virus are 
common throughout the state and are also found in urban areas. 

The clinical component of the Board of Health is primarily the responsibility of the Public Health 
Nurse, Tina Scanlon, R.N. The Department of Public Health mandated responsibilities include 
communicable disease surveillance, investigation and follow-up, adult and child immunization, 
Mantoux Skin Testing for Tuberculosis (TB) and TB Case Management. Non-mandated services 
include a number of health screenings and prevention and education programs for general wellness. 

The Public Health Nurse is active in the Massachusetts Association of Public Health Nurses, 
Massachusetts Health Officers Association, School Health and Wellness Advisory Committee and 
Community Health Network Area (CHNA-15). She attended emergency management trainings 
through MEMA and FEMA. Tina was certified as a BLS (Basic Life Support - CPR/AED) Instructor 
through the American Heart Association and continued the certification and recertification of town 
employees. The Public Health Nurse continues as a site leader and training coordinator for the 
Board of Health Public Access Defibrillation Program. Automated External Defibrillators (AED) can 
be used by trained personnel in the event of cardiac arrest. 

Elder Services included weekly screening and education programs at the Buzzell Senior Center. 
Education programs encompassed current health issues, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer's 
Disease, fall prevention, food borne illness etc. In-home elder services provided were home safety 
evaluations, health assessments, administration of Physician ordered medications and referral to 
medical providers and service agencies. 

The Public Health Nurse gave child and adult Hepatitis A 
and B, Tetanus, Pertussis, Measles, Mumps, Rubella, 
Polio, Pneumonia and Influenza immunizations in homes 
and in the office. Other in-home and in-office services 
include blood pressure, blood sugar and weight screenings, 
administration of Physician ordered medications, general 
health assessment and consultation and referral to 
medical, mental health and social work providers. The 
Public Health Nurse obtained a CHNA-15 mini grant to 
promote sun safety. The Board of Health teamed up with 
the Wilmington Police Department on August 2, 2012 for 
the annual "Police Beach Day" at Silver Lake. The Board 
of Health had pamphlets regarding "Sun Safety". We had donations from a sunscreen company that 
included sunscreen and SPF lip balm. We had a free raffle for five different packages that included: 
beach umbrellas, multiple sunscreens, lip balms and sunglasses. This was a great community health 
promotion activity that we hope will continue every year. 

-71- 




The Salvation Army Good Neighbor Energy Fund Program was continued in 2012. This program 
provides fuel and other energy assistance to income eligible residents. Referrals were made for 
assistance (basic living essentials and comfort and recreation services) to those in need. 

An Employee Health and Benefits Fair was held in April in coordination with Director of Health 
Services, Doreen Crowe, R.N., the Public Health Nurse and the Town Manager's office. A number of 
local health providers from the Wilmington community participated such as chiropractors, 
nutritionists, massage therapists and various sports clubs. Retired public health nurse, Ann 
Fitzgerald, R.N., Tina Scanlon, R.N. and Doreen Crowe R.N. performed blood pressure screenings for 
town employees. In addition, Concentra provided BMI calculations and Winchester Hospital 
performed spirometry testing. Special thanks go out to Wendy Martiniello who works in the Town 
Manager's office for all her extra effort and help in organizing the Employee Health and Benefits 
Fair. 

The Board of Health receives state supplied flu vaccines every year. This year our state supplied 
allocations were cut again. Therefore, the Health Department purchased flu vaccines privately. 
This was done to meet the demand of our residents for flu shots. With all the vaccine arriving in the 
fall of 2012, the Board of Health held flu clinics at the Town Hall and another at the Senior Center. 
Several small clinics were subsequently held in the Public Health Nurse's office. The public flu 
clinics were for all residents' ages five and up. School based flu clinics were once again held with the 
cooperation of all the school nurses and school department staff. Daily surveillance for Influenza- 
like illness in the community is an ongoing effort by the Town nurse and school nurses. To prevent 
flu like illness, infection controls were practiced in schools and in all public buildings. Since the 
Health Department is a Mass Immunization Site, we took advantage of a reimbursement program 
administered by the National Health Information Center (NHIC) and UMass Medical that 
reimburses towns for the program costs related to the seasonal flu vaccine. This year Kim Mytych 
took part in a training program to learn about submitting claims for reimbursements from various 
private insurance companies and Medicare for administering and administrative costs associated 
with the flu vaccination clinics. 

The Director led the on-going activities of the Medical Reserve Corps (MRC). Both medical and non 
medical members of the community are encouraged to join and become part of a public health 
emergency response team whose function is to respond to emergencies such as bioterrorism, 
hurricanes, vaccination planning and other such disasters. During the early seasonal flu clinics late 
this past year, MRC volunteers continued to work all of our planned clinics. 

This year the Wilmington Board of Health petitioned the State Department of Public Health for a 
Emergency Preparedness Region Change, which was granted in the fall of 2012. Wilmington left 
Region 4A and moved to Region 3B, the Greater Lawrence Public Health Coalition. Geographically, 
the realignment for Wilmington to Region 3B makes sense. Wilmington was at the tip of the 34 
community Region 4A and is more in line geographically with Region 3B. The Board of Health 
already has in place Memorandum of Understanding's (MOU's) with several towns in that region 
and our Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC) has mutual aid agreements in place. Our 
Fire Department (who is directly in charge of Emergency Management) is in District 6, which 
encompasses all of those towns in Region 3B. Historically, we are communities that plan well 
together. These MOU's and mutual aid agreements are incorporated into Wilmington's Emergency 
Management plan. The population ratio puts Wilmington in the middle of Region 3B and culturally 
the Town of Wilmington is similar in profile. Wilmington currently has 70 members of its MRC and 
those members could be added to the Greater River Valley MRC. 

The Director served as a member for the Region 3B Coalition, a group of six communities designated 
by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH). The coalition receives grant funding 
for local Boards of Health for emergency planning and infrastructure improvements for emergency 
response activities. In 2012, the Board of Health received grants and equipment from the region for 
improvements and upgrades for local emergency planning. In addition, the department also 
continued to use public health emergency response funds for flu clinic planning and preparation. 
The purpose of Public Health Emergency Management training is to develop an emergency ready 
Public Health Department. 

-72- 



With these grant funds from the MDPH, the Board of Health outfitted all the Wilmington Public 
Schools and public buildings with hand sanitizer unit refills. The Board of Health also replenished 
clinic supplies for both the Public Health Nurse's office and all the school nurses. Office supplies, 
training expenses and a new computer were purchased for the Board of Health office. The Director 
and the Public Health Nurse frequently attended training in relation to public health emergency 
response held throughout the year. Trainings are always funded by the Public Health Emergency 
Preparedness (PHEP) grant program. 

The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) held its annual seminar at the Wilmington 
Middle School. This seminar is conducted for health officers in the DEP Northeast Region and is 
hosted each year by the Wilmington Board of Health. 

The Title 5 Septic System Betterment Loan Program, which began in 1999 and continued each year 
thereafter, received funding again in 2005 and was reauthorized in 2010. Loans were made to 
homeowners which are to be repaid to the town through the betterment process appearing on the 
regular tax bill. This was made possible by a $200,000 grant from DEP and the Massachusetts 
Environmental Trust and will continue as encumbered monies are still available. 

The Canada Geese Control Program has continued operations throughout the year in cooperation 
with the Massachusetts Department of Fish and Wildlife. 

In a continuing effort to control the environmental impact of elemental mercury, residents can 
exchange fever thermometers containing mercury for digital thermometers at no charge at the office 
of the Board of Health. The office will also receive and recycle thermostats, mercury switches, 
button cell batteries and any other items which contain mercury. The recycling of fluorescent light 
tubes containing mercury from the schools and public buildings continues and residents are 
encouraged to bring compact fluorescent lamps to Aubuchon Hardware, 2261 Main Street, 
Tewksbury for recycling. This recycling program is supported by outside funding at no cost to the 
Town of Wilmington. 

The Annual Rabies Clinic was held on April 7, 2012 at the Public Buildings Department on Church 
Street. A total of 206 dogs and cats were inoculated with rabies vaccine by Dr. James Kim of the 
Wilmington Veterinary Hospital. The next rabies clinic is planned to be held on Saturday, April 6, 
2013. 

The Wilmington Substance Abuse Coalition was formed in 2012 under the directive of the Board of 
Health. The focus of the Wilmington Substance Abuse Coalition (WSAC) is to prevent and reduce 
harmful or illicit substance abuse within our community. This is a collaborative effort between the 
Wilmington Police Department, Board of Health, Wilmington Public Schools, parents, youth and 
volunteer community organizations. One of the purposes of the coalition will be to apply for a 
Federal Drug Free Communities SAMSHA grant in 2013. The five year grant would enable us to 
move forward with a youth substance abuse education and prevention movement in the Town of 
Wilmington. 

In an effort to address the significant impact on the youth and young adults of the Town of 
Wilmington who are exposed to, and possibly abusing, alcohol, drugs and tobacco, WSAC will be 
focusing on community change strategies to reduce substance abuse such as: providing information 
and education relative to the dangers of substance abuse, enhancing skills for our youth and parents 
on best practices in deterring substance abuse, providing support for individuals and families 
struggling with substance abuse, using Social Media tools and modifying/changing policies. 

In November of 2012, the WSAC held a "Parents Night Out" event at the Middle School. This was a 
drug awareness presentation that addressed the drug epidemic and the prevalence of drugs in the 
Wilmington area. We discussed the signs of drug use in the home, where people are getting the 
drugs, why the drugs are so addictive and why this addiction can ruin families. We heard first hand 
from parents who have lost their children to drug abuse and from the Police Department about what 
this epidemic is doing to our community. Local substance abuse organizations were present to 
provide advice and information. This was a very successful event with well over 300 in attendance. 



-73- 



Funds Collected: 



Reimbursements for Influenza shots 


A d A Q 


A 1 

41 


Nurse's Total Fees Collected (various testing) 




UU 


Transport/Haulers Permits 


a cnn 
4,bUU 


UU 


Animal Permits 


l,o4U 


UU 


Funeral Homes 


onn 
ZUU 


UU 


Percolation/Soil Tests 


q Qnn 


fifi 
UU 


Sewage Disposal Systems Permits 


o onn 


UU 


Food Establishment Permits 


Zl,Uoo 


UU 


Tanning Salons 


1 nn 
1UU 


flA 

UU 


Installers Licenses 


q eon 


nn 
UU 


Subdivision Review 


U 


UU 


Photo Copies 


A Q 

4o 


/in 
4U 


rveci cation Ldinps 


Ann 


nn 


Well Permits 


950 


00 


Rabies Clinic 


2,060 


00 


Pool Permits 


300 


00 


Housing Inspection Certificate Fee 


100 


00 


Ice Rink 


100 


00 


Tobacco Sales Permits 


4,200 


00 


Grants 


500 


00 



TOTAL FEES COLLECTED: $ 62,342.81 




Effective July 1, 2008 the responsibilities of this position were assumed by representatives from the 
State Division of Standards. The following inspections were conducted by the Sealer of Weights and 
Measures in calendar year 2012 for the Town of Wilmington: 



Inspections Number Sealed 

Tested and sealed supermarket scales 56 
Tested and sealed pharmacy weights 10 
Tested and sealed truck scales 8 
Tested and sealed gas station meters 169 
Miscellaneous 25 



The Sealer of Weights and Measures maintains fairness in the marketplace. 




Field House at Alumni Field 



-74- 



EDUCATION 




Wilmington's educational vision is built on the belief that our mission is to provide a student 
centered education which fosters critical inquiry enabling the individual to be a productive citizen, 
respectful of self and others and capable of adapting to a changing world and its technology. The 
competition created by a global economy, the proliferation of computer technologies and the growth 
of decentralized work organizations all increase the need for an educated workforce with higher 
levels of initial skills and greater ability for thinking analytically and continuous learning. 

Success in the 21st century requires knowing how to learn. Students today will likely have several 
careers in their lifetime. They must develop strong critical thinking and interpersonal 
communication skills in order to be successful in an increasingly fluid, interconnected and complex 
world. Educating Wilmington's children and young people is the most intensive activity in which the 
town engages. We know that 21 st century learners must master content while producing, 
synthesizing and evaluating information from a wide variety of subjects and sources with an 
understanding of, and respect for, diverse cultures. We know that 21 st century learners must 
demonstrate the three Rs, but also the four Cs: critical thinking and problem solving, creativity and 
innovation, communication and collaboration. They must demonstrate digital literacy as well as 
civic responsibility. Virtual tools and open source software create borderless learning territories for 
students of all ages, anytime and anywhere. Powerful learning of this nature demands well- 
prepared teachers who draw on advances in cognitive science and are strategically organized in 
teams, in and out of cyberspace. 

Student learning is the bottom line for our schools. Everything we do, establishing a vision, setting 
goals, managing staff, rallying the community, creating effective learning environments, building 
support systems for students and guiding instruction must be in service of student learning. The 
Town of Wilmington continues its historic and longstanding commitment to supporting its schools so 
that they can function as learning communities. In addition, two nonprofit organizations, the 
Wilmington School Business Partnership and the Wilmington Education Foundation continue to 
pursue and distribute funds from private sources to supplement the Town's funding of its public 
schools. Funds raised by both these organizations help to provide the school children with tools 
needed to learn more effectively and the teachers with resources that enhance their instruction. We 
are grateful for their good work. 

Professional development is the link to quality teaching and learning and ultimately to increased 
student achievement. It has the power to increase educators' knowledge of academic content and 
teaching skills while changing what educators believe about student learning and how they interact 
with students. We are proud of our Wilmington University which allows our staff to take courses 
after school, on weekends and even virtually. This is a desirable characteristic of a culture of 
continuous learning, teachers teaching teachers. The result is that we have continued to make 
significant academic gains in our classroom and have broadened enrichment experiences for our 
students. 

In the fall of 2012, the Wilmington Public School system welcomed 37 new staff to its instructional 
corps. In addition, Jeffrey Strasnick was hired as Principal of the Woburn Street School and 
Wildwood Early Childhood Center. Mary Houde was appointed permanent Director of Special 
Education. Three new district positions were created; STEM Coordinator, Pre-K-12 
English/Language Arts Coordinator and District Data Specialists. On August 28th we greeted 3,619 
students as we opened our doors for a new school year. 

The Wilmington Public School System has much to be proud of as we look forward to the 2012-2013 
school year, most importantly, breaking ground on a new high school. This new school will serve 
current students and future students for decades and will allow us the opportunity to provide the 
learning environment needed in order to teach skills for the 21st Century. 



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Once again, we remain committed to providing our students with the best possible programming to 
assure that they are poised to be effective leaders in the 21st century. We continue to review and 
refine curricula, engage in high quality professional development and learn new and innovative ways 
to address the learning needs of all students. 

WILMINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 

This year has been an exciting time to be a member of Wilmington High School. We continue to 
work to break ground on the new high school. The High School Building Committee and High School 
Working Group have spent many hours working to fight a steady stream of appeals and have 
consistently been on the side of victory. Demolition of the high school gym will signal the start of the 
process. We are thankful for the support of the community and look forward to building a model 
school that will benefit future generations. 

During the last year, our athletes were involved as new members of the Middlesex League. Our 
athletes showed that we can be competitive in the new league and quickly made their mark as solid 
performers. In fact, our Boy's Ice Hockey team became State Champions for the first time in over 60 
years. We continue to look forward to our teams working hard and being competitive as we start our 
second year. 

We welcomed several new staff members to WHS. Christopher Phillips was hired as a new Assistant 
Principal. New teachers include: Wendy Cahill in the Foreign Language Department, David Dooks, 
Paul Gately, Sandra Robb, Ashley Forrester and Michelle Valhouli in the Special Education 
Department, Kathleen O'Brien, Sarah Paquette and Jennifer Storer in the Science Department and 
Megan Mandeville in the Mathematics Department. We look forward to their enthusiasm and 
expertise in and out of the classroom. 

The High School Library Committee has developed a plan to change the current High School Library 
layout to better meet the needs of our staff and students. Initially, 6,000 books were removed from 
the library because they have not been taken out for more than 8-10 years. This signals a change to 
a more 21 st Century library format including robust access to eBooks, online databases, eCard 
catalog, wireless devices and a wireless system. New furniture has been purchased and the overall 
design enhanced to enable more classes to use the space. The changes also allow us to experiment 
and develop changes before we move into the new school. 

This year, members of Wilmington High School were selected to participate in the National 
Assessment of Educational Progress. This assessment is used to develop the annual report on 
education. Only 13 states are asked to participate. 

This year, our students will be travelling far and wide. We have a group of students travelling to 
Quebec with the Foreign Language Department. Over 130 members of the Strings Attached group 
will be travelling to Ireland and a small contingency will be spending four weeks in Peru during the 
summer of 2013. 

During December break, a new wireless system was installed in the Adams Street Wing. The system 
will open the doors for our staff and students to begin to experiment with bring your own device in a 
21 st century school setting, in anticipation of our new high school. Access to Web 2.0 tools, 
applications and new technologies will add to the efficiency and educational opportunities for our 
students and staff. 

As a whole, our students are off to a strong start this year. Over 40 students made it to the State 
competition level at the local DECA conference in November. This is an impressive accomplishment 
for a program that is only three years old. Student Rachel Alatalo completed a second 50 thousand 
word novel. Joanna Torres was selected as the Superintendent's Leadership Award winner and was 
presented with a certificate at a School Committee meeting. She was also accepted to Harvard 
University early action. Michelle Barnes and James Kendall represented WHS at the Regional 
Student Advisory Council. Wayne Huynh was crowned World Champion in two areas of Tae Kwon 
Do competition. We are very proud of the accomplishments so early in the year and look forward to 
many more! 



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Business Department 

The Business Department continues to thrive and grow with academic and extra-curricular activities 
available to challenge students. The business courses continue to offer a challenging curriculum 
fostering critical thought while providing opportunities for problem solving and course mastery. 

Students from the Managing Your Money course participated in the 2012 U.S. Department of the 
Treasury's National Financial Capability Challenge in the spring of 2012. The National Financial 
Capability Challenge is designed to increase the financial knowledge of high schoolers in an effort to 
enable students to control their financial futures. For the third year in a row, our students achieved 
great success. Twenty-eight students received certificates for scoring in the top 20th percentile of 
national scores. 

Recognizing the need for our students to be financially literate and acquire the skills necessary to 
make smart financial choices, the Business Department has made the Managing Your Money course 
a graduation requirement, beginning with the class of 2015. In this course, students learn the 
importance of financial planning, budgeting, investing, credit, financial services and insurance 
protection. In 2011-2012 the enrollment of students in Managing Your Money continued to grow. 
We hope to have many more students participate in the Financial Literacy Capability Challenge in 
the spring of 2013. 

An integral part of the course, Managing Your Money, is student participation in the Stock Market 
Game. The game is a virtual program where teams of students start off with $100,000 to invest in 
the stock market. Over the course of a ten-week period, students learn about stock basics, research 
stocks and maintain a portfolio of stock investments. As we continue to expand and enhance 
Managing Your Money, students also have the opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills to 
creating a Virtual Business, a Personal Finance simulation. 

On Friday, December 14, 2012 several members of the Business Technology Department attended 
the New England Financial Literacy Institute at the Federal Reserve Bank in Boston in conjunction 
with Bridgewater State and Salem State University Centers for Economic Education. The institute 
provided an opportunity for teachers from around the state to network and share resources and ideas 
in a continued effort to promote the importance of financial literacy for high school students. In 
addition to attending several financial information sessions, teachers also received a free copy of the 
latest version of Virtual Economics featuring 51 key economic concepts, a copy of Learning, Earning 
and Investing for a New Generation and several sources for games and online learning. 

The DECA Club, which prepares emerging leaders and entrepreneurs in marketing, finance, 
hospitality and management in high schools and colleges around the globe, enhances the co- 
curricular education of students who are enrolled in a business course. The DECA Club has had 
continued success in competition at the District, State and National level. Last winter, 53 
Wilmington High School students competed in the DECA district competition against eight other 
schools. Students answered a 100 question business test followed by a business role play where they 
developed a solution to a business problem and presented it to a business professional who rated 
their performance. Wilmington High School business students continually demonstrate their ability 
to think quickly on their feet and demonstrate critical thinking skills and creativity. As a result, 
Wilmington High School won 41 medals and 38 students attended the State competition in March 
held in Boston with three students winning State Competition and going onto International 
Competition in Salt Lake City, Utah. Additionally, 12 Life Skills students participated in the DECA 
District conference, enjoyed their own competition, received medallions and shared camaraderie with 
the DECA Club. 

Accounting students continue to a use web-based technology which allows them to complete all 
homework and tests using a paperless learning platform which is fully integrated with the textbook. 
The Business Department's Desktop/Web Publishing class has been rebranded into Web 
Design/Internet Marketing. This change reflects the growing influence the Internet has on 
marketing and the overall business environment. While the class will continue to study the 



-77- 



technical and strategic methods of website design, additional time will address how businesses use 
the Internet to drive growth and tackle business problems. The class will also deal with the 
economic impact social media marketing has on buyer behavior and business decisions by studying 
the impact that platforms such as Facebook and Twitter have on consumers and businesses, by 
building social and business connections. 

One of the popular new courses being offered is Honors Sports and Entertainment Marketing. 
Students are learning about how sports franchises and entertainers make money as well as all 
aspects of marketing, management and careers within the field. Students had the chance to 
showcase their knowledge and creativity by presenting marketing ideas to marketing executives at 
The Hall at Patriot Place. The executives were impressed with the ideas Wilmington High School 
students developed to increase attendance to the Hall from student selected target markets. 

The school is pleased to open the WHS School store, named by students as "The Wildcat's Den." 
Students who are enrolled in Marketing, Accounting and Entrepreneurship classes work in the store 
as part of their curriculum. The students have run promotional campaigns to generate excitement 
for their product selections for Spirit Week and for the holiday shopping frenzy. Students run the 
store, select the merchandise and keep the financial records, making this a fantastic investment by 
the Wilmington Education Foundation who enabled the store's existence through a grant. Life Skills 
students, partner with the business students, to run the store which makes this a great learning 
endeavor for all. 

English Department 

Twenty-first Century Skills include communication, critical thinking, collaboration, accessing and 
analyzing information and imagination. The 2012-2013 school year reflects the work of the English 
Department as they create and align curriculum to reflect the newly adopted Common Core State 
Standards. Teachers have been using the integrated approach to literacy, emphasizing close reading 
of increasingly complex texts and the addition of writing arguments based on essential questions. 
They continue to work on integrating nonfiction with core texts as they facilitate classrooms which 
reflect increasingly complex literacy skills. There has been increased emphasis on professional 
development and support for teachers as they transition and shift their English/Language Arts 
pedagogy and practice. 

Wilmington High School English 

Senior Honors English students are working on their yearly Capstone projects that focus on 
individually reading an author's works and analyzing them. Senior A Level English students 
finished The Canterbury Tales Pilgrim Projects where they each took pilgrims from the poem and 
retold their tales in their own words in video format. 

In Expository Writing, students are writing Division/Classification essays on topics such as Skiers on 
the Slopes, Types of Vacations and Types of Soccer/Hockey Players. The students are also finishing 
up Process Analysis presentations to the class in which they had to include a visual component. In 
tenth grade, students are doing MCAS review and reading Shakespeare's Macbeth. 

In English 11 classes, students are reading The Crucible, examining the history of the Salem Witch 
Trials and the similarities and differences between Miller's play and the actual historical events. 
They are studying the definition of, and the effects of, mob mentality as it happened throughout the 
trials, and also examining a 1993 murder trial in Arkansas which was prompted in part by mob 
mentality. Students have been discussing and responding in writing to the notion of false confession 
as it relates to The Crucible and to the 1993 trial. 

The following contributions of the English Department members make a strong impact within the 
department and the Wilmington Public School system. 



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Ms. Lisa Bellavia and Ms. Mia Parviainen advise the high school's literary magazine, Expressions. 
Ms. Meghan Estrada, Ms. Lisa Desberg and Ms. Mia Parviainen are preparing students for a Poetry 
Out Loud National Recitation Contest. Through the Poetry Out Loud National Recitation Contest 
students are exposed to the dynamic aspects of slam poetry, spoken word and theater. By engaging 
in the district supported workshop, teachers had the opportunity to learn more about Poetry Out 
Loud, hear from teachers and students who participated in our first Wilmington High School 
competition last year and develop lesson plans in order to prepare their students to memorize and 
perform their poems. 

Ms. Meghan Estrada and Social Studies teacher, Ms. Tracey Kassin are teaching and creating 
curriculum for an English/Social Studies Interdisciplinary Course. Their central goal is to produce 
an English/Social Studies Interdisciplinary Curriculum for sophomore honors students that outline 
essential questions, goals and objectives, texts and materials and other assessments aligned with the 
Common Core and state frameworks. 

Ms. Lisa Desberg, Ms. Mia Parviainen and Ms. Maureen Dolan created a series of Common Core 
aligned lesson plans for teaching Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. In addition, plans and resources 
were shared using the electronic assistance of the online resource tool, Edmodo. 

Foreign Language Department 

The Foreign Language Department is pleased to welcome three new teachers. On the high school 
level, Ms. Laura Efron and Mrs. Wendy Cahill, both of whom are teaching Spanish and on the 
middle school level, Ms. Adrienne D'Agostino, who is teaching 6 th and 7 th grade Italian. Ms. Efron is 
a graduate of Carleton College and has a Master's degree from Lesley University. She has spent a 
considerable amount of time in Chile and in Spain. Mrs. Cahill is a native speaker of Spanish 
originally from Guayaquil, Ecuador. She will begin a graduate program at Salem State University 
in the summer. Ms. D'Agostino is a graduate of UMASS/Amherst and visits family in Italy every 
year. 

The High School has added two more classes of first year American Sign Language (ASL) and will 
offer a class of second year ASL second semester this year. Teaching ASL is Ms. Chanel Garcia, who 
worked for the last seven years in Wilmington as an interpreter for a deaf student who graduated in 
2011. This is the second year that three languages are now being offered in grade six at Wilmington 
Middle School: Spanish, French and Italian. The High School Foreign Language Department is now 
offering a three-year sequence in Italian (Italian 1, 2 and 3) which is funded in part by a grant from 
the Centro Attivita Scolastiche Italiane (C.A.S.I.T). 

During April vacation, seven high school students travelled to Costa Rica for a ten day stay. Staff 
chaperones were Ms. Pietro and Ms. Santana. French teacher Joanne Veliz will chaperone a group 
of 25 students to Montreal, Canada the last weekend in April, 2013. The itinerary includes visits to 
the former Olympic venues, historical monuments, museums, the old city, McGill University and 
Notre Dame Cathedral. 

Curriculum Team Leader Joyce Beckwith presented several workshops at the national conference of 
the American Association of Teachers of French, which was held in Chicago, IL from July 2 nd 
through July 9 th . Mrs. Beckwith is a member of the Executive Board of this association. She also 
presented a session at the conference sponsored by the American Council of Teachers of Foreign 
Languages (ACTFL) which was held in Philadelphia, PA from November 15 th through November 
18 th . Mrs. Beckwith has also been invited by the Northeast Conference of Teachers of Foreign 
Languages to present a session at their conference in Baltimore, MD the first weekend in March, 
2013. 

The department regretfully said goodbye to Spanish teacher Alba Santana who moved with her 
family to New York. She is now teaching Spanish at the Ethical Culture School in the Bronx. 



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Guidance Department 

The Wilmington High School Guidance Department appreciates and understands the needs of our 
students and their parents. The department strives to improve upon its service to our students by 
keeping up-to-date in our practice and focusing on grade level issues, college planning, career 
exploration and personal and emotional well-being. 

The Naviance on-line platform continues to act as an important conduit in the Guidance 
Department's conveyance of information to our students and families. This year, for the first time, 
all of our students have access to the features of Naviance. Grade 9 students were introduced to the 
features of the program by completing a learning style inventory designed to empower them to 
embrace their own strengths in the learning process. Sophomores utilized the program for career 
planning and took part in interest inventories to help narrow career choices. Juniors and seniors 
utilize the program for researching and applying to college. In the three years since subscribing to 
Naviance, the program undoubtedly has streamlined the manner in which the counselors work with 
our students. Most importantly, Naviance continues to be a support in the ongoing process of 
encouraging and promoting a college going culture in our school. 

During the summer of 2012, the Guidance CTL offered two sessions of a newly developed College 
Essay Writing Seminar. Fifty-six students participated in the program during which the importance 
of a well-honed essay was the focus. At the end of the seminar, students left with the essential 
components of their college essays and a vision for the final product. The program was highly 
successful and will be offered again in the future. 

Once again, the Wilmington High School Guidance Staff sponsored programs that address the 
various stages of the college application process. The department believes that it is vital that 
students begin researching postgraduate options early. The Alumni Roundtable in early January 
welcomes members of the previous year's graduating class who are eager to share anecdotes about 
college life with our juniors and seniors. In January of 2012, forty members of the Class of 2011 
returned to share their college experiences with our future graduates. In February, Junior Parent 
Night coincided with in-class junior seminars focused on the initial steps in implementing an 
effective college search process. As a follow-up to this presentation, the Guidance staff sponsored the 
Senior Parent Breakfast in late September. In 2012, this event was attended by 80 parents. In this 
presentation, parents are encouraged to work as partners with the Guidance staff to support the 
students in their future planning. In conjunction with this presentation, students accessed Naviance 
to explore college resources and begin the application process. The annual Financial Aid Night 
featured a representative from a local university who answered important questions about applying 
for financial aid. Information about scholarship opportunities is maintained both in Naviance and in 
the Scholarship Binder, which is located in the Guidance Office. The Guidance staff believes that 
each of these events and resources contributes to supporting students and their families in successful 
realization of future goals. 

The Wilmington High School Guidance Department offers college preparatory testing through the 
College Board. In mid-October, the guidance staff administered the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude 
Test to 206 sophomore and junior students. In conjunction with the WHS Advanced Placement 
curriculum, 83 students tested in the College Board's Advanced Placement Program during May 
2012 under the direction of the Guidance Curriculum Team Leader. 

To date, the WHS counseling staff has processed over 648 college applications with over 53.9 percent 
of seniors applying to college as of January 2013. We are proud to announce that our students have 
been accepted to the following colleges: Assumption College, Babson College, Bay State College, 
Boston College (Carroll School of Management), Brandeis University, Bridgewater State University, 
Curry College, Elon University, Emmanuel College, Fairfield University, Fitchburg State University, 
Fordham University, Framingham State University, Franklin Pierce University, Gordon College, 
Harvard University (Harvard College), Hofstra University, Johnson and Wales University, Lasell 
College, Lynchburg College, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Merrimack 
College, Middlesex Community College, Northeastern University, Pennsylvania State University 
(University Park), Philadelphia University, Purdue University, Quinnipiac University, Regis 



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College, Rivier University, Roger Williams University, Saint Joseph's College (ME.), Saint Michael's 
College, Salem State University, Salve Regina University, Seton Hall University, Simmons College, 
Southern New Hampshire University, State University of New York at Albany, Stonehill College, 
Suffolk University, University of Tampa, University of Hartford (School of Business), UMass 
Amherst, UMass Dartmouth, UMass Lowell, University of Michigan, University of New England, 
University of New Hampshire, University of New Haven, University of Vermont, Villanova 
University and Western New England University. 

Members of the Class of 2012 are attending the following colleges: American International College, 
Anna Maria College, Arizona State University, Assumption College, Babson College, Bentley 
University, Berklee College of Music, Boston College, Boston University, Bridgewater State 
University, Bryant University, Colby College, Colby-Sawyer College, Curry College, Elon University, 
Endicott College, Fitchburg State University, Florida Gulf Coast University, Framingham State 
University, Franklin Pierce University, High Point University, Hofstra University, Husson 
University, Ithaca College, Johnson & Wales University, Lasell College, Lesley University, Lyndon 
State College, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences, Merrimack College, Miami 
University, Oxford, Middlesex Community College, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 
New York University, North Shore Community College, Northern Essex Community College, 
Norwich University, Plymouth State University, Quinnipiac University, Rhode Island College, Rivier 
University, Saint Anselm College, Salem State University, Simmons College, Southern Connecticut 
State University, Southern New Hampshire University, Springfield College, State University of New 
York at Albany, Stonehill College, Stony Brook University, Suffolk University, Texas Tech 
University, The College of New Jersey, The New England Institute of Art, Tufts University, 
Universal Technical Institute, University of Massachusetts Amherst, University of Massachusetts 
Boston, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, University of Massachusetts Lowell, University of 
New Hampshire, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, University of Rhode Island, University 
of Vermont, Wentworth Institute of Technology, Westfield State University, Wheelock College, 
Worcester Polytechnic Institute and Worcester State University. 

Mathematics Department 

The Mathematics Department at Wilmington High School is comprised of 11 full-time teachers each 
teaching five classes and one Curriculum Team Leader who teaches three classes. We have 
welcomed one new mathematics teacher this year who is starting her teaching career after recently 
graduating from the University of New Hampshire. 

The courses offered in the Mathematics Department range from Algebra 1 through AP Calculus. 
Beginning with the Class of 2014, students are required to complete 20 credits of mathematics in 
order to be eligible for graduation, making mathematics a four-year requirement at Wilmington High 
School. At this time our current juniors and seniors complete their three year program with Algebra 
2 and may choose a fourth year of mathematics from one of our senior electives which include two 
programming courses, Algebra 3, Pre Calculus, Introduction to Trigonometry, Introduction to 
Probability & Statistics, Statistics, Honors Calculus AB and AP and Calculus AB. We have also 
decided to include more options for our seniors and at this time we are proposing to include an 
Engineering Design course in our program for the 2013-2014 school year. We hope to introduce 
students to the different fields of engineering and also to the engineering design process. Many of 
our current ninth graders have completed Algebra 1 in grade 8 and are enrolled in Geometry this 
year. They will advance to Algebra 2 as sophomores. We anticipate a revision to our High School 
Mathematics Program over the next several years as we anticipate the need to expand our offerings 
as we begin our curriculum renewal process. This process has begun and several high school and 
middles school teachers are involved in this work. We have started this project with a series of visits 
to other high schools to investigate their programs and to evaluate our own. This work, as well as 
our curriculum work that is ongoing, will prepare us to complete the tasks of this process. Another 
aspect of this work requires us to align our curriculum to the Common Core Standards (CCSS) on 
which our newly developed Massachusetts State Standards have been based. Many of the 
Mathematics teachers at both the middle and high school levels worked during the summer of 2012 
to rewrite curriculum in order to meet the timelines mandated by the Department of Elementary 
and Secondary Education (DESE). We continue to work throughout the 2012-2013 school year to 
complete the alignment to the CCSS. 



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Our high school students continue to improve in our standardized testing. MCAS results were very 
positive again this year with a large percentage of our students scoring either in the Proficient or 
Advanced status. We continue to offer a Math Workshop course to our tenth graders as a 
preparation for the May exams. This course is designed to reinforce skills and to develop test-taking 
strategies. We also offer opportunities for extra preparation for eligible students through our 
Academic Support Services Program which is offered three different times during the school year 
and sometimes over the summer months. This program is funded by a grant which has been 
approved by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE). 

Our Advanced Placement testing in Calculus AB also demonstrates positive results with close to 100 
percent of those tested achieving a qualifying score on the 2012 exams. 

SAT Review classes are also offered through both the English and Mathematics Departments. These 
classes are scheduled in the fall and also in the spring. Classes are offered in the evenings during 
the week and on Saturday mornings. The fall and spring sessions usually run for the six weeks prior 
to the SAT tests which are administered in November and December and in May and June. 

Science Department 

The Wilmington High School Science Department has been doing some very exciting things this year 
in regards to welcoming new staff, preparing for new science standards and providing great learning 
opportunities for students. Here in Wilmington, our teachers realize that, while working in 
education can be daunting and complex, the most important thing is what goes on between teachers 
and students. 

As an example of such rich interaction in the life sciences, Brenda Marcoux's Honors Biology 
students are in the first stage of writing essays to qualify for The Dupont Challenge essay contest. 
Last year at this time, one of Mrs. Marcoux's students received an Honorable mention for her essay 
in this national competition. Richard Fardy's AP Biology students are currently doing in-depth 
collaborative investigations. Topics include both diffusion and determination of allele frequencies in 
populations. Open investigations which follow structured inquiry help students learn real science by 
doing it instead of merely hearing about it. This is part and parcel of the required curriculum 
frameworks for AP Biology that went into effect this fall. 

At the end of October, the Biotechnology and AP Biology classes traveled to BU Medical School, a 
biannual event, to participate in engaging laboratory experiences. These laboratory experiences 
expose our students to "cutting edge" information and help the students become more experienced in 
laboratory protocol. The Biotechnology class participated in a laboratory called In Search of the 
Body's Antibodies, a simulated test that screens for the presence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 
(HIV) in a hypothetical patient. This test performed by the students is an Enzyme Linked 
Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), which uses an enzyme that links to a specific antibody to detect for 
the correct protein or antigen from the virus. This biannual event is a great opportunity that shows 
our students real life examples of lessons learned in class. 



On the physical sciences front, students are being 
exposed to excellent learning opportunities that 
range from Jennifer Storer and Kathy O'Brien's 3D 
Periodic Table to James Demos' Windmill Design 
Project to Teresa Marshall's new and unique 
Organic Chemistry course. Recently, chemistry 
students in Mrs. Storer's class discussed the 
question "Why is Mars red?" as a launching point 
into the connection between the process of losing 
electrons and the formation of iron oxide, the 
substance giving Mars its color. Mr. Demos' 
Introduction to Technology students created designs 
that varied widely, producing a few surprisingly 
efficient windmills! While students study properties 




Top three electricity producing windmills 



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of matter through chemistry and design through engineering, they also 
have many opportunities to study matter and motion through studies 
of physics. For example, students in Carol Mutchler's Introductory 
Physics course recently held their annual Egg Drop Contest. As is 
evident, there are many exciting things happening in the sciences here 
at Wilmington High School and we look forward to more student 
opportunities that lie ahead. 




9 th grade Introductory Physics students 
Brianna Kumm, jonnie Perella and Melissa 
McNamara holding their "egg crafts " 
alongside instructor Carol Mutchler 




Ms. Mutchler preparing 
for the egg drop 



Social Studies Department 

Members of the Wilmington 
High School Social Studies 
Department participated in 
History Connected, which 
offered professional 
development funded by a 

Teaching American History Grant, sponsored by the 
United States Department of Education. Through this 
grant several teachers participated in a History Book 
Group, School Day Seminars and a weeklong Summer 
Institute. Unfortunately, 2012 represented the third and 
final year of the three-year grant. No new Teaching 
American History grants were funded by the federal 
government for the new year. Wilmington High School 
and its History Connected partner districts hope that this 
will change in the coming years, as it was a tremendous 
source of professional development for both history content 
as well as pedagogy. 



As 2012 came to a close, preliminary work was underway to introduce two new Advanced Placement 
courses to the Wilmington High School Social Studies Department. Michael Maloney is looking 
forward to developing an AP United States Government and Politics course, while Michael Kinney 
looks forward to developing an AP Microeconomics course. 



WILMINGTON MIDDLE SCHOOL 



The 891 students housed in the Wilmington Middle School range from sixth to eighth grade. 
Students are assigned to one of three houses for their three years at the school: Challenger, 
Discovery and Explorer. The breakdown of students in each grade is as follows: Grade six-284, 
Grade seven-298, and Grade eight-309. The Wilmington Middle School welcomed over 15 new staff 
members for the 2012-2013 school year. Wilmington Middle School consistently reinforces the Core 
Values of the building, Responsibility, Citizenship and Confidence, in academic, social and extra- 
curricular areas. The many planned events over the course of the school year foster a positive school 
climate while making learning fun, exciting and interactive. 

In the year 2012, students participated in a variety of activities designed for learning and growing. 
In January, Game Show Live was held. This is a sixth grade social event that allows students to 
develop relationships with their teachers and their classmates. Students answer trivia questions 
about the core curriculum and popular culture in order to earn points with their team. This multi- 
media style presentation builds school spirit and camaraderie within the sixth grade. In March, 
Mrs. Brenda Galvin and 8 th grade students traveled to the Boutwell Early Childhood Center for Dr. 
Seuss' Read Across America Day. This cross-age activity allows Wilmington Middle School students 
to share their passion for reading and demonstrate the importance of the skill of reading to the 
younger children. In April, sixth grade students had an assembly program that integrated their 



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learning of Ancient History with a live mythology performance. Chariot of the Sun, presented by 
Jeffrey Benoit, allowed students to meet the heroes, gods and monsters of Greek mythology! Using a 
combination of poetry, masks, mime and skillful audience participation, the presenter brought these 
classic tales to life. Also, in April, sixth graders were able to experience an "in-school" field trip with 
the New England Aquarium. Students were able to participate in a hands-on lab by completing a 
squid dissection. Both of these curriculum-based enrichment programs were made possible by funds 
from the annual Magazine Drive Fundraiser. 

The Annual Technology Fair also took place in April 2012. All seventh graders rotate through two 
technology labs filled with engineers from Analog Devices. Students work through various stations 
involving chemistry, power sources, electricity and sound. This Technology Fair is organized by 
teachers, David Pinette and Kevin Welch, and retired Analog engineer, Chuck Kitchin. Students 
were impressed by the knowledge of the engineers and were enthralled with the technology that 
came alive. In October, eighth grade students visited New York City for the day. This annual trip 
aligns with the students' Language Arts curriculum and the themes of immigration and freedom. 
Important stops and sights included Ellis Island, the Statue of Liberty, Liberty State Park and the 
Tear Drop Memorial. In late October, interrupted by Hurricane Sandy, all grades had the chance to 
visit the National Science Center's Mobile Discovery Unit. Housed in 18 wheelers, the mobile 
centers travel around the country presenting programs designed to show young people that studying 
science and math is fun as well as essential to their future. 




Chrystyan Soeum shares a book with Kindergarten 
students as part of Dr. Seuss' Read Across America Day 

English Department 



Building responsibility and empathy in our 
students is also paramount at Wilmington Middle 
School. Students help out and give back when 
they can. For example, Strings students traveled 
to the Buzzell Senior Center in December to 
provide holiday music for the seniors in their 
community. When assistance was needed in 
selling 9/11 red, white and blue bracelets to raise 
funds for the memorial, students and teachers 
pitched in for the effort. Our hearts came together 
for the community of Newtown, Connecticut as we 
wanted to support the students, staff and families 
of Sandy Hook Elementary School. Our sixth, 
seventh and eighth graders made hearts and 
snowflakes to send along to those affected in the 
tragedy. We are proud of our students when they 
show compassion, spirit and resilience. 



Mr. Brian Caira focuses his English Language Arts 
classes on developing writing style, functions and 
techniques, reading and analyzing various types of 
literature, strengthening vocabulary and improving 
grammar usage. He also serves as a co-advisor to 
Wilmington Middle School's student council and as 
the Advisor of the WMS Newspaper Club. 

Ms. Jeanne McGonagle and Ms. Sarah Perkins 
attended the Best New Young Adult Books 
workshop led by former chair of the Newbury Book 
Award. They shared literary resources and book 
lists with the English Department. Ms. McGonagle 
is also facilitating and leading a Wilmington 
University book club offering for middle school 

teachers. Six works of literature will be studied in terms of potentially introducing them into our 
core curriculum as core novels, summer reading books and/or texts to be part of thematic units 
related to the Common Core. 




Seventh Graders visit the Mobile Discovery 
Science Center 



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Ms. Sarah Perkins, Ms. Kristin Smith and Ms. Dotty Bowen attended a course through the Salem 
State Collaborative Project in October that focused on learning about how to adapt 
English/Language Arts curriculum to fit the newly adapted Common Core State Standards and the 
Massachusetts Frameworks. Following the course, these teachers have been involved in creating 
and teaching newly aligned curriculum which has been supported through professional development. 
Collaborative unit/lesson designs are helping move students toward the 70/30 ratio of informational 
to narrative literacy required by the upper grade levels. 

Ms. Missy Simmons organizes the eighth grade Washington, DC field trip. Students make a 
connection to the eighth grade ELA curricula when they explore the Holocaust Memorial Museum. 
A major cornerstone of the grade eight curricula is literature that is based on the experiences during 
the Holocaust. Students read "The Diary of Anne Frank" and learn many aspects of the historical 
implications, but most importantly learn about tolerance and acceptance. 

Grade seven Discovery has had an eventful November and December in English/LanguageArts. 
Students read and analyzed Charles Dickens' Classic novel A Christmas Carol. In preparation for 
the novel, students explored Victorian England through the use of a Scavenger Hunt WebQuest. 
Students learned about events in Dickens' childhood that shaped his opinions about the treatment of 
the less privileged, union workhouses and Victorian treats such as plum pudding. Upon completion 
of the novel, students were able to see literature in action by viewing the North Shore Music 
Theatre's musical adaptation of A Christmas Carol. 

Social Studies Department 

The Social Studies Department (6-12) completed year one of the Curriculum Renewal Process in the 
spring of 2012. Those middle and high school teachers who participated helped develop a Beliefs and 
Direction Statement for the department, a needs assessment, as well as a report on the trends and 
issues in the field of Social Studies education. The Social Studies Department (6-12) commenced 
year two of the Curriculum Renewal Process in the fall of 2012. Those middle and high school 
teachers who participated have been working to align the core Social Studies courses at the middle 
and high schools with the Common Core Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies. These 
teachers have also begun to develop common writing assessments for the core Social Studies courses 
at the middle and high schools. 

NORTH INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL 

There are currently 322 students at the North Intermediate School in grades four and five. There 
are seven fourth grade classrooms, seven fifth grade classrooms and one language-based classroom 
at the school. Our students have access to a broad academic curriculum that includes 
Reading/Language Arts, Math, Social Studies and Science. Students also participate in a variety of 
specialist periods each week. Music, Art, Physical Education, Library/Media, Health, Chorus and 
D.A.R.E., as well as stringed and band instruments, provide students with a well-rounded 
curriculum. Our students also continue to participate in the Second-Step anti-bullying program. 

Beyond the regular curriculum we strive to expose our students to a broad range of other educational 
and community-building experiences. We were visited by the Mobile Science Van from the National 
Science Center in October. Our students participated in a national student presidential election in 
November. Our fourth graders participated in the "Orchestrating Kids through the Classics" 
program offered by the Lexington Symphony Orchestra. Our fifth graders were exposed to foreign 
languages through our after school foreign language club. In the spring, we sponsored a career day 
where classrooms were visited by guest speakers from the community who shared their job 
experiences with our students. Our students participate in the school banking program sponsored by 
the Lowell 5^Savings Bank. The North Intermediate School was awarded a check for $500 from the 
bank because of our high level of student participation in the program. We implemented a Sign 
Language Club for the first time this year. Participation in the annual Wilmington Education 
Foundation (WEF) Fundraiser Halloween Walk is always a highlight! 



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We continue to work to update and improve our technology program. We are into our third year of 
implementation of the Renzulli Learning System in both grades four and five. Renzulli is a web- 
based program that is designed to help students achieve by focusing on their strengths, their 
interests and the ways they like to learn and express themselves. Students are put in touch with 
engaging, individualized resources specifically chosen for their interest areas and learning styles. 
We also continue to utilize the Study Island Program. Study Island is another web-based program 
that includes specific instruction, assessment and reporting of student's performance. All lessons are 
built directly from state academic standards. We continue to utilize Smart Boards, mimio devices, 
In-Focus projectors, digital visual projection devices, Grade Master 600 Scanner, Mimio Vote and 
Kindle e-Books to provide students with access to the latest technologies as well as the Internet. All 
of our classrooms are now equipped with ceiling-mounted projectors providing full student access to 
the single desktop computer in each room. Mrs. Peachey, our Library-Media instructor continues to 
expand her use of our E-Instruction Classroom Performance System (CPS) in her classes. 

Improving our school-wide performance in math continued to be a primary focus at the North 
Intermediate School this year. Our school data team analyzed MCAS data and identified areas of 
weakness which led to focused math instruction and interventions. Our students continued to 
participate in the Math Facts Challenge. Students are evaluated on a weekly basis on their ability 
to complete math facts problems in a timely manner. Students are tested in the four basic math 
operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division). As they successfully complete each 
operation they are rewarded by their classroom teachers with a pencil which recognizes their 
achievement. When all four operations have been successfully mastered students are awarded a 
certificate and have their name and picture added to our "Math Facts Superstars" bulletin board. 
Our students also continued to participate in the Math Olympics challenge program after school. 

Under the direction of school guidance counselor, Rebecca Farnham, the North Intermediate School 
implemented a new peer leadership program this year. This program was designed to expand on the 
positive aspects of both the peer mediation program and student council. Students were elected, 
from each grade five classroom, by their peers to represent the school as student leaders. These 
students, called the "NorthStars" took on a leadership role with several community service projects. 
In cooperation with WCTV these students also participated in an after-school video club where they 
were trained how to operate digital video equipment. Ultimately, they created a video yearbook for 
the school. 

Communicating with parents and the community continues to be a top priority at the North 
Intermediate School. Three primary forms of communication are used. E-mail continues to be the 
quickest and most efficient means of communicating information in a timely manner. All staff 
regularly communicate, both among themselves and with parents, via e-mail. Secondly, we use our 
school website as a means of communicating more general school information. Lastly, and often in 
conjunction with our website, we continued to utilize the Alert Now phone information system. 
Recently we changed over to Blackboard Connect for the same purposes. We have found that 
sending out phone/e-mail messages to alert parents of upcoming events, and/or directing them to the 
website for more detailed information, is both timely and efficient. 

Safety continues to be a high priority at the North Intermediate School. In order to ensure the 
continuous improvement of these practices, the safety committee meets regularly to discuss ways to 
implement new procedures to address our changing needs. We have continued the process of 
providing room keys to all teachers and staff members and to require all volunteers complete CORI 
forms and all staff members wear I.D. badges. Visitors and volunteers are also required to wear 
badges whenever they are in the building for any reason and all staff members are required to have 
CORI checks completed. Various fire and emergency drills are conducted regularly to ensure 
readiness in the case of a real emergency. In the fall, we successfully conducted our second full 
school emergency evacuation. All students and staff safely and quickly evacuated the building. It is 
an ongoing goal of the North Intermediate School and the Wilmington Public Schools to anticipate 
any possible emergency situation and to develop a plan to ensure the safety of all students and 
school personnel. 



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The North Intermediate School is extremely appreciative of the PAC for its ongoing generous 
support of our school and its programs. The fundraising activities they sponsor each year generate a 
considerable amount of money for programs and materials that benefit the school and enhance the 
curriculum. They provide enrichment programs for our students and generously purchase a variety 
of materials for the school. Character building and anti-bullying have been a recent focus of our 
enrichment programs. Two outstanding programs were brought in during the fall. Molly Sliney, an 
Olympic fencing champion, talked to our students about overcoming obstacles to achieve their goals. 
"Ooch" educated us about our individual "super powers" and how to stand up to bullies. Two PAC- 
sponsored activities that are always well-received are our annual Girl's Dance and Boy's Night Out. 
The North Intermediate School is grateful for the hard work and support of the PAC. We recognize 
it is the combined efforts of parents and teachers that create an atmosphere for learning which 
strives to meet the needs of each child and fosters the well-being and success of all students. 

WEST INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL 

The West Intermediate School prides itself on creating a positive environment; greeting children by 
name and making each child feel valued as members of the school community. The West 
Intermediate School staff is always working together to improve the quality of our instruction and 
our service to community. We welcomed Lynn Manning as our new CARES coordinator, which was 
our only change in the staff in the year 2012. 

Staff members participated in continued professional development activities that support the 
District Strategic Plan and the North and West Intermediate School Improvement Plan. We 
continued with our web-based programs, including Renzulli Learning, Study Island and other Web 
2.0 tools. Ninety percent of our classrooms are equipped with Mimio devices coupled with projectors, 
a set-up that allows direct student interaction with any program being used. We also added two 
Mimio Vote systems, which allow students to use remote clickers to answer displayed questions in 
real time and then provide immediate feedback for the class. Our staff participated in the STEM fair 
in the spring, which was a great opportunity for families to engage in a variety of science-based 
activities. We have continued to support and participate in Professional Development activities that 
strengthen our use of new technology for both teaching and learning, ensuring that our students are 
provided the skills they need to become 21 st Century learners. 

In the classrooms, we participated in many activities in 
addition to our academics. An important goal at the 
West Intermediate School is to instill in the children a 
sense of personal achievement and social awareness, 
particularly around bullying behaviors. The Second 
Step program has been very successful in teaching 
empathy and good decision-making skills to our 
students. We continued with our Explorer Day, Poetry 
Day and Math Immersion Day; participation in 
Wilmington Fire Department's Toys for Children In 
Need, collecting food for the local food pantry, the 
annual winter coat drive sponsored by Anton's Cleaners 
and Box Tops for Education. 

We continue with our featured wellness program, 
"Recess Before Lunch." We also began a before school Department's "Toys for Wilmington Children " program 

exercise club, called West Walks, which was open to 

anyone who chose to participate. The group met four mornings each week in the gym before school 
and did walking tapes, jump rope and other aerobic activities, all in support of research that makes a 
positive correlation between vigorous physical activity and strengthening cognitive skills. In gym, 
the children participated in the Five Minute Fitness Run, where every child in the school ran for five 
full minutes without stopping. In art, children participated in the Reading Municipal Light 
Department's T-shirt contest; made pottery, murals and collages that we displayed throughout the 
school. In music, the children performed at the Wilmington High School for the whole town holiday 
concert in December. Our Wilmington Education Foundation (WEF) fundraiser walk in October was 
again a huge success, securing funds for use in the upcoming year. 




Student Council members present toys to the Fire 



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The Wilmington CARES program operates daily from the West Intermediate School and is an 
integral part of our school community. Lynne Manning is the site coordinator at the West 
Intermediate School. In addition to regular daily activities, she has also arranged for the children to 
attend sessions at GymStreet USA and for groups of children to spend time working on craft projects 
at the Wilmington Health Care Center, which is a nursing home and rehabilitative center. 

The Shawsheen/West PAC continues to support grades one to five at both the Shawsheen 
Elementary and the West Intermediate Schools. They provide Student Planners and West T-shirts 
for every child. They fund enrichment programs, which included Mister Magnet, 
Techsploration/Simple Machines and Cryogenics. The PAC also organized additional activities such 
as the Ice Cream Social, Holiday Gift Fair, Grade 5 Student Yearbook, Family Game Night and the 
Grade 5 Yearbook Signing Party, which is the final farewell to the fifth graders as they prepare for 
the Wilmington Middle School. 

SHAWSHEEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

The Shawsheen Elementary School, serving students in grades one through three, houses 18 general 
education classrooms and three special education classrooms. Staying true to our course, the 
Shawsheen Elementary School continues to be committed to increased student achievement by using 
data to drive instruction and to impact student performance outcomes. 

All classroom teachers have been trained with the use of AIMSweb, which serves as one of the 
assessment tools in reading, as we continue to make strides implementing the Massachusetts Tiered 
System of Support (MTSS), formerly known as Rtl (Response to Intervention). Three times a year, 
all students are assessed by their teachers, using AIMSweb. This information was crucial in helping 
teachers design instruction to meet the individual needs of students as well as providing the teachers 
with an early detection system for students who may be at risk in reading. By progress monitoring 
students throughout the year, teachers were able to provide custom interventions to assist students 
in making steady progress. This year, specialists, support staff and special education personnel 
served as interventionists. They were assigned to certain classrooms. By visiting our newly created 
intervention closet, they chose appropriate activities to implement with students to address their 
specific reading needs. 

Teachers now administer the Fountas and Pinnell Reading Leveling Assessment to their students. 
By having this information, teachers were better able to instruct their students at their reading 
instructional level and ensure they had reading materials available at their appropriate reading 
levels. Teachers visited our new literacy closet that contains multiple copies of literature in a variety 
of genres at the different reading levels. In addition, teachers were able to challenge their students 
in a way that allowed them to make progress through the leveling system. This assessment will be 
administered twice yearly to provide teachers with the needed data to continue to drive their reading 
instruction for their students. Both the AIMSweb data and Reading Level information were 
available for teachers to share with parents during parent conferences. 

In the math content area, classroom teachers will be administering benchmark testing twice a year. 
The initial testing will provide teachers with the current skill level of their students. The final 
assessment will demonstrate the progress achieved by all students. The input of the results in our 
Scantron machine provides teachers with data on each of their students as well as a comparison with 
other students in their comparable grades. 

The Shawsheen Data Team, comprised of administrators, classroom teachers, support staff and 
special education personnel, stayed their course in analyzing data to better inform them and the 
faculty about areas of strength and areas needing to be further addressed in the content areas of 
reading and math. New this year, the team began analyzing local data (AIMSweb) in addition to 
MCAS results. With the assistance and guidance of the district's data specialist, the team has 
become equipped with information, charts and data to better investigate student performance. The 
team has just begun work with using data walls to more publicly display student performance. They 
have begun with a staff data wall, using information acquired from AIMSweb, to exhibit data in the 
Teachers' Lounge. The data will be updated on a regular basis in order to provide the faculty with 
ongoing student progress and achievement. 



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The Shawsheen Elementary School has teacher representation on the district's Math and Reading 
Vertical teams. Both the elementary math liaison and literacy coordinator focused a majority of 
their work on drawing curriculum maps to ensure that the skills and concepts found in both our 
math and reading programs cover the adopted Massachusetts Common Core Standards. For any 
standard not being addressed in our reading and math curricula, teachers will be given the 
necessary supplemental lessons and materials. The goal is to align the common core standards by 
the end of the 2012-2013 school year as outlined in the school improvement plan. 

Realizing the importance and impact of integrating technology for instruction, most of the 
classrooms have been equipped with ceiling-mounted projectors. Teachers enrolled in professional 
development opportunities focused on the use of the projectors for daily instruction. It is clear this 
technology has enhanced the learning experiences for students. Some teachers are also using 
mimios to enhance instruction. Both teacher and student response have been positive in making 
learning more relevant, meaningful and fun. This approach becomes more essential as we focus 
instruction in addressing 21 st century learning for students. 

Once again, the Shawsheen Elementary School participated in a reading incentive program and 
offered an after school test-taking assistance program. The reading program was entitled "High Five 
for Reading." By reading nightly, students were able to earn number charms each month for the 
duration of the program to add to a chain. In preparation for the MCAS, third grade students were 
offered an after school program to further sharpen their test-taking skills. Both programs saw good 
student participation while helping them with the joy of reading and the building of confidence when 
taking tests. 

To continue to strengthen the building of good student character, the "Keys to a Better Me" program 
was sponsored again by the assistant principal and the guidance counselor. Each month a new value 
(i.e. respect, responsibility, kindness, etc.) was presented during lunch time with a video, reading 
and student skit. The value was reinforced throughout the month. Teachers also had students 
participate in classroom activities focused on the monthly value. Student work was displayed on 
bulletin boards located in the cafeteria. 

The guidance counselor continued to implement the Second Step program in all classrooms. 
Discussions were aimed to assist students in developing skills in getting along with others, focusing 
on using positive approaches and strategies to deal with any potentially problematic experience. 
Role playing is a key element, in helping students acquire the necessary skills. The Second Step 
program, along with the values program, is an effort in promoting anti-bullying awareness in our 
school. 

Student safety remains a top priority at the Shawsheen Elementary School. Students continue to 
participate in a variety of safety drills including a building evacuation practice, monthly fire drills, 
lockdown drills and bus evacuation drills. Safety protocols are regularly reviewed by the district's 
Safety Committee comprised of members from the 
school and public safety departments. 

A mock presidential election was conducted to 

replicate the national election occurring in 

November. Students entered the conference room, 

which was transformed into a voting poll, to cast 

their ballots. The polls were manned by student 

council members as they checked each voter's name 

upon entering and leaving the voting poll. Students 

voted for the president and vice president only. 

Ballots were counted and the students re-elected 

President Obama to a second term by a narrow 

margin. Students seemed to really enjoy the voting 

experience. 

Third grade student after voting in the school's 

presidential election 




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The Shawsheen Student Council remained active throughout the school year. Members were 
comprised of three student representatives from each of the six third grade classrooms. The council 
was coordinated by the assistant principal. The members helped with community service projects 
and the school's character education program. They also worked with the assistant principal in 
filling supply orders for teachers, keeping the copier room supplied with paper and activating the 
computers in the computer lab. Additionally, the members helped with all of the school's concerts. 
All student council members demonstrated a high level of responsibility. 

Parents also remained an integral part of the school community. Parent involvement in the Parent 
Advisory Council (PAC) and the School Advisory Council (SAC) continued to be high. Parent 
volunteers in the computer lab, the library and the lunch room proved very helpful too. As a result 
of the hard work and efforts of parents, the school continued to be well supported. 

The Shawsheen Elementary School remained dedicated to providing meaningful and productive 
learning experiences for all students. The collection and analysis of data equipped staff members 
with the necessary information to address and meet the individual needs of the students. We are 
also committed to assisting students in building a solid foundation in becoming responsible citizens. 
By addressing the diverse needs of all students, it is our belief that we can help them in maximizing 
their learning potential . 

WOBURN STREET SCHOOL 

This year the Woburn Street School has a total enrollment of 457 students in grades one, two and 
three. There are seven first grade classrooms, seven second grade classrooms, eight third grade 
classrooms and one special education language-based classroom. New staff members this year 
include Principal Jeff Strasnick. Mr. Strasnick comes to Woburn Street School after spending the 
past four years as principal of the Horace Mann Elementary School in Melrose. Reading specialist 
Holly Banusiewicz transferred over from the North Intermediate School. Also new to Woburn Street 
School this year is Michael Rickman. Mr. Rickman is a sign language interpreter in Ms. Carlson's 
first grade classroom. We also have one graduate student from Merrimack College with us this year. 
Ms. Sheree Morande is part of the Merrimack Fellowship Program and will be helping out as she 
finishes her schooling. She is completing her internship in Ms. Martin's third grade classroom. 

With the help of our School Advisory Council, we developed a 2012/2013 School Improvement Plan to 
guide us in the coming year. The first goal in the plan is to align the Houghton-Mifflin Reading 
program and the Math Trailblazers program curriculum maps with the Massachusetts State 
Common Core Standards. With the recent adoption of the new state standards we need to ensure 
our current programs are addressing the concepts covered in the standards. Much of this work will 
be done by the district's elementary math and reading vertical teams. These teams are comprised of 
teachers from different grade levels and schools. Along with the elementary literacy coordinator and 
the elementary math liaison, these teams will identify areas that need to be supplemented, excluded, 
expanded upon, etc. This information will then be passed on to all classroom teachers for use in 
their daily teaching. 

Another goal for the Woburn Street School is to implement a school-wide multi-tiered system of 
supports for English and Language Arts instruction. Now that the AIMSweb assessment tool is 
being fully implemented throughout the school, this data, along with other sources of data, will be 
utilized to provide appropriate intervention and extension activities for all students. This past year 
Woburn Street School has benefited from block scheduling for English Language Arts instruction. 
Each classroom has an uninterrupted 90 minute block of ELA instruction with an additional 30 
minutes outside of that block to provide either intervention or extension activities for students based 
on their individual needs. 

The Woburn Street School was pleased to utilize the funds raised from the Wilmington Education 
Foundation two years ago to purchase leveled reading materials for grades one through three. The 
materials were organized to create a literacy closet which all teachers can utilize to help in 



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differentiating instruction in small groups. We have now begun to add intervention resource 
materials to that closet to assist teachers in providing intervention instruction in reading when 
needed. Some of these materials come to us from the Florida Center for Reading Research which is 
provided at no cost to the school. 

The third goal from the School Improvement Plan is to develop a consistent Science/Engineering and 
Technology curriculum from grade to grade and school to school with common expectations for 
students. Based on the results from a recent teacher survey, teachers don't have all the resources 
necessary to provide consistent science instruction for their students. The district's science vertical 
team will be investigating and piloting various science programs this year in an effort to adopt one 
for the district for the 2013/2014 school year. This is also being coordinated with the efforts of the 
district's STEM coordinator, Paul Monaco. 

In addition, the staff recently developed a school-wide character education program. It was 
developed to provide students with appropriate models of behavior to be successful both in school 
and beyond. The program consists of a leveled behavior management system that is being used 
consistently in all classrooms. This system allows for students to learn from their mistakes by 
reflecting about their behavior and also rewards individual students and classrooms for exhibiting 
positive behaviors. This program also includes a monthly school-wide community meeting. This 
community meeting brings the students and staff together to discuss positive things going on in the 
school and also to highlight different character traits that we are looking for students to exhibit. 
These traits may include such things as determination, empathy, imagination, etc. 

The Woburn Street School continues to increase our technology capabilities. Through grants and 
PAC funds we have been able to equip every classroom with a projector. We have also been able to 
equip many classrooms with Mimio devices. This technology allows teachers to create interactive 
lessons through the projector and onto the classroom's white board. We will continue to identify 
funding sources in order to ensure that every classroom receives one. 

The annual Reading Incentive Program continues this year to encourage children to read at home. 
Our theme is "Kick it up and Read" and the children have been busy reading each day to complete 
the program's requirements. In an effort to encourage students to utilize Study Island and Reading 
Eggs at home, we will be promoting a whole school goal to increase home/school technology usage. 

The Woburn Street School is fortunate to have a long and cooperative association with the Northside 
PAC. The PAC sponsors a variety of fundraising activities to generate money for programs and 
materials that benefit the school and enhance the curriculum. The PAC regularly provides 
enrichment programs for our students, as well as providing a variety of materials each year. The 
Woburn Street School is extremely grateful for the hard work and support of the PAC. 

BOUTWELL EARLY EDUCATION CENTER 

The Boutwell Early Childhood Center is a school dedicated to the education of young children. The 
Boutwell Early Childhood Center is fully staffed. It is a comprehensive early childhood site that is 
home to an Integrated Pre-school Classroom, a Substantially Separate Pre-school classroom, six 
Kindergarten Classrooms and the Bridge Program. In addition, the Boutwell houses an Extended 
Day Kindergarten Program (CARES). 

The Wilmington Public Schools is in its sixth year of full day Kindergarten at both Early Childhood 
sites. The program is five hours and fifteen minutes in duration daily. The children have a morning 
snack, lunch period and recess each day. The Boutwell Early Childhood Center is able to offer a 
multi-faceted learning experience to the students, which includes participation in physical education, 
music, art, library and computer lab. There is a Reading, Math and Science Program in place, which 
carries through to the elementary school. Special Education services are available for those students 
who qualify and need assistance in the areas of Speech and Language, Occupational Therapy, 
Physical Therapy and Resource Learning services. In addition, there is a Reading Specialist on staff 
at the Boutwell Early Childhood Center. The Reading Specialist focuses on reading support and 
enrichment to the Kindergarten students. 



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The Pre-school Program continues to be a half-day program, Monday through Thursday. The 
Integrated Pre-school Program has adopted the Pre-K component of the Houghton-Mifflin Reading 
Language Arts Series. It introduces pre-school students to the Alpha Friends, which is the 
cornerstone of the Reading Program. The children are also involved in many thematic units of study 
within the framework of the pre-school curriculum. Both the Pre-school and Kindergarten 
curriculums are aligned to the Massachusetts Common Core Standards. 

The Boutwell and Wildwood Early Childhood Centers have adopted a new report card placing us on 
a three term report card cycle. Teacher representatives from both Early Childhood Centers 
developed the report card and aligned it with the Common Core curriculum. The report card was 
officially adopted by the School Committee in October of 2012 and has been fully implemented by the 
schools. The Boutwell Early Childhood Center has begun using AIMSweb Test of Early Literacy, 
this screening tool is administered to each Kindergarten student three times a year. The results of 
this screening assist teachers in differentiating instruction to meet student's individual needs. The 
Houghton-Mifflin Reading/Language Arts Program and Trailblazer Math Program are firmly 
established in the Kindergarten curriculum. Our Kindergarten classes also maintain book buddies 
with the West Intermediate students. 

The Boutwell Parent Advisory Council (PAC) has been a strong and involved presence at the 
Boutwell Early Childhood Center this year. Members of the PAC work closely with staff and 
administration. The enrichment programs funded by PAC, which included "Explore the Ocean", 
"Pioneer Living", "Magic Jim" and visiting author Matt Tavares, have greatly enhanced our 
curriculum. PAC has brought families together with such events as Family Fun Night and the Ice 
Cream Social. Their contributions to the students and families, has been instrumental in developing 
a sense of community at the Boutwell Early Childhood Center. 

Our School Advisory Council (SAC) is another opportunity to involve parents. It includes 
representatives of parents, teachers and administrators from both the Boutwell and Wildwood 
Schools. Their charge is to develop a School Improvement Plan that is based on safety, security, 
curriculum and building initiatives. The Boutwell and Wildwood Early Childhood Centers are 
currently in the process of obtaining accreditation from the National Association for the Education of 
Young Children. 

Two concerts are held during the school year under the direction of our Music Specialist, with 
assistance from Pre-school and Kindergarten staff. In February, a winter concert was presented to 
parents and friends. This year's theme was "Winter Fun." In June, parents and family members 
were treated to a program that celebrated the end of the Kindergarten year. Our Pre-school classes 
hosted an "In School Snow Day", when parents and siblings were invited to attend and enjoyed a 
variety of "snow" day activities and crafts. In June the Pre-school classes celebrated the end of the 
year with a performance, "Going Buggy." The Boutwell Early Childhood Center students also learn 
about the Town of Wilmington and the world around us. Activities that the children participate in 
included visits by the Town Manager, Fire Chief, Police Chief, School Superintendent and 
Postmaster at a "Mini Town Meeting", held in the Boutwell Early Childhood Center Auditorium. 
The Wilmington unit concluded with a field trip to the Harnden Tavern Museum. 

The Boutwell Early Childhood Center continued to provide a positive and productive learning 
environment for its students, many of whom are experiencing public school for the first time. Our 
staff strives to create a balance between each child's social emotional development while at the same 
time cognizant of curriculum and instruction. With the support and involvement of our parents, we 
endeavor to make each child's school experience an enriching one that will lay the foundation for the 
years to come. 

WILDWOOD EARLY EDUCATION CENTER 

The Wildwood Early Childhood Center, located at 182 Wildwood Street, currently has an enrollment 
of 171 Kindergarten and Pre-school students. This September, the Wildwood Early Childhood 
Center began the sixth year of full day Kindergarten after making a successful transition from half 
day Kindergarten in 2007. The Wildwood Early Childhood Center is presently comprised of seven 
full day Kindergarten classrooms as well as our Kindergarten Compass Program for students with 



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special needs. The five hour and fifteen minute Kindergarten day allows our students to learn 
experientially and at a pace that is conducive to in-depth exploration of curriculum. The Wildwood 
Early Childhood Center also offers two pre-school programs. The integrated pre-school program is a 
half-day program with two sessions that run four days a week for two and a half hours a day. In 
addition, the Wildwood Early Childhood Center offers a full day pre-school for students with special 
needs that runs for five hours and fifteen minutes four days a week and three hours every Friday. 
Our pre-school and Kindergarten programs help build a foundation of skills and early development 
for our students. The Wildwood Early Childhood Center also houses the Wilmington Public Schools 
Special Education Department. 

All Kindergarten students at the Wildwood Early Childhood Center receive weekly art, music, 
library and computer time. Physical education classes are offered twice weekly. The Kindergarten 
library program at the Wildwood Early Childhood Center is currently coordinated and run by parent 
volunteers. Our pre-school students also participate in library and computer time once a week. Both 
the library and computer programs at the pre-school level are run by parent volunteers. The 
inclusion of thirty minutes of designated computer time for every pre-school and Kindergarten 
classroom has enabled all of the early childhood students to interact directly with technology on a 
weekly basis which has been extremely beneficial to the facilitation of early technology skills for our 
pre-school and Kindergarten students. This year, the district purchased a web-based early literacy 
program, Reading Eggs, for Kindergarten students to utilize during their assigned computer time. 
The program has been a wonderful enhancement to the existing Kindergarten English Language Art 
curriculum. Lunches are served to all of our full day students on a daily basis. Special education 
support services, such as Speech/Language Therapy, Resource/Learning Support, Occupational 
Therapy and Physical Therapy are available for students who are determined eligible through the 
Special Education Department. 

The Wildwood Early Childhood Center prides itself on being a student-centered educational facility, 
emphasizing individual student development, strong student-centered curriculum, family 
involvement and positive school climate. Central to our Kindergarten curriculum are the Houghton- 
Mifflin English Language Arts Program, which is also utilized in the pre-school and the Math 
Trailblazers Program. Both programs lay the foundation for student success across multiple 
curriculum areas. In 2008, the Kindergarten classrooms adopted the Harcourt Science Program. 
Through this hands-on science program, our Kindergarten students are encouraged to explore life, 
physical and earth science. The staff has worked diligently to align the science curriculum with our 
existing reading and math programs and they continue exploring additional ways and resources to 
most effectively teach science to early childhood students. 

The staff of the Wildwood Early Childhood Center recently developed a school-wide character 
education program. It was developed to provide students with appropriate models of behavior to be 
successful both in school and beyond. The program consists of a leveled behavior management 
system that is being used consistently in all classrooms. This system allows for students to learn 
from their mistakes by reflecting about their behavior and also rewards individual students and 
classrooms for exhibiting positive behaviors. This program also includes a monthly school-wide 
community meeting. This community meeting brings the students and staff together to discuss 
positive things going on in the school and also to highlight different character traits that we are 
looking for students to exhibit. These traits may include such things as determination, empathy, 
imagination, etc. 

This past year we also introduced a new district Kindergarten report card. The report card 
committee met over the 2011-2012 school year to develop a report card that better aligns to the new 
Massachusetts Common Core State Standards. Both the Wildwood and Boutwell Early Childhood 
Centers held an informational meeting for parents to go over the new report card that is now sent to 
families three times a year. 

In addition to the Kindergarten and pre-school adopted curriculum, we also invite various 
enrichment programs to visit the Wildwood Early Childhood Center throughout the year to enhance 
our existing programs. In an effort to support our Houghton-Mifflin Language Arts Program, closely 
monitor student progress and assist in guiding our literacy instruction to meet every student's 



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individual needs, the AIMSweb reading assessment was adopted at the beginning of the 2011-2012 
school year. The AIMSweb reading assessment is a standardized reading assessment designed to 
gather baseline data on students and assist in the identification of individual student strengths and 
weaknesses in the area of literacy. 

The staff from early childhood programs across the district work together to design classroom and 
school activities that facilitate the acquisition 21 st century skills that will prepare them for success in 
the future. Staff members work tirelessly through participation in district-wide committees to keep 
our curriculum current and aligned with the standards adopted by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. Classroom and center activities focus on age-appropriate literacy skills, phonemic 
awareness, mathematics, written language, science, social studies, technology integration and social 
skill development. Social and emotional development is an equally important facet of our curriculum 
in the pre-school and Kindergarten programs. Play and positive peer interactions are woven into 
every child's day. 

Our School Advisory Council (SAC) is a combined committee of administrators, teachers and parents 
from the Boutwell and Wildwood Early Childhood Centers, who meet on a monthly basis to develop a 
school improvement plan for the early childhood centers and monitor the progress of outline goals for 
the year. The School Improvement Plan is a compilation of goals addressing the school's needs 
around learning results, professional development, facilities, community, technology and 
communication. 

Additionally, our parents put forth great interest and enthusiasm in all of their efforts to support our 
school through an active Wildwood Parent Advisory Council (PAC). PAC sponsors enrichment 
opportunities for our students that include field trips, materials for classrooms and the school, 
presentations and Family Fun Nights that help bring together the Wildwood Early Childhood Center 
community. 

In the spring, the Wildwood Early Childhood Center participates in a school-wide thematic unit that 
focuses on the Town of Wilmington. Through this Wilmington Unit, students learn about the 
community, landmarks and traditions of their hometown through activities designed to meet all 
areas of the curriculum. During our unit we also have a "Mini Town Meeting" where various town 
officials come to our school and establish important relationships with our young students. Officer 
Moon, our safety officer, is a friendly face to all the children as he presents bus and community 
safety programs and Lt. Hurley, along with many other Wilmington fire fighters, bring important 
fire safety messages and programs to our Wildwood students. We are thankful to have such 
community involvement and support for the children at the Wildwood Early Childhood Center where 
our goal is to meet the needs of all our students in order for them to succeed and develop a life long 
love of learning. 

PERFORMING ARTS DEPARTMENT 
A New Vision 

Throughout history, human cultures have rarely existed without some form of musical expression. 
We believe that the value of music and drama exists in their inherent potential to enhance our lives 
by broadening the boundaries of our thinking, our personal expression and our actions throughout 
an entire lifetime. This cultural endowment is ensured when children are presented with an 
organized and sequential music education that aligns with the Massachusetts State Frameworks & 
Standards. The performing arts experience should include a comprehensive foundation of both skills 
and concepts of music and theater in which each and every child can achieve a measurable 
attainment of personal success, develop critical thinking and begin to master the art of collaboration. 
Above all, students should be provided with the intellectual and emotional tools that foster a lifetime 
of musical participation and pleasure. 



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The faculty of the Performing Arts Department includes nine full-time and one part-time teachers 
who have worked together to revise, update and improve the K-12 music and theater curricula 
during the past year, driven largely by the mandates of the above mission statement. The faculty 
crafted the mission statement to acknowledge the continued necessity of quality arts education in 
the lives of the 21 st century students in our schools. With the unparalleled administrative and 
community support in the Wilmington Public Schools, the Performing Arts Department faculty 
strives to provide the best music and theater education possible to our students. We invite you to 
visit our new Performing Arts website www.wildcatperformingarts.com to learn more about our 
programs and performances. 

Highlights 2012 

At the elementary school level, (K-5) our music students are provided with a weekly music class in 
which we foster a love for and excitement about music. Students begin their path toward lifetime 
music participation by learning about the basic elements of music, instruments of the orchestra and 
by forming a fundamental music vocabulary. Each grade level is presented with the opportunity to 
demonstrate their newly acquired music skills in a public concert once during the school year. 
Wilmington's Elementary School students also benefit tremendously from special music and theater 
enrichment programs sponsored by the PAC and our Superintendent, Mrs. Joanne Benton. For 
example, for the third year in a row, all of our fourth grade students will participate in the Lexington 
Symphony's "Orchestrating Kids Through Classics" program, courtesy of our Superintendent's office. 

Continuing the journey toward a lifetime of music, all of our middle school students in grades six 
through eight participate in music classes as well. However, it is at this level that the students have 
the opportunity to specialize their music education. Performance ensemble classes, organized by 
grade level, are offered for Band, Strings and Chorus. In these classes, students continue to develop 
the vocal and/or instrumental skills that started to take shape in elementary school. Students in 
these ensembles participate in several public performances each year including the Winter Music 
Festival and annual Vertical Concerts each spring. Alternately, students can also choose from 
several non-performance music classes, including keyboarding and acoustic guitar. We welcomed 
Mr. Brian Dollaway, a new music teacher to the middle school this year for the eighth grade chorus 
and guitar classes. Extra-curricular music and theater experiences are also available to our middle 
school students in the form of the Jr. Jazz Band, which performs at the annual Pops concert and the 
Drama Club which will present the modern classic musical, "Once on This Island" in the spring. 

The Performing Arts faculty and students at Wilmington High School eagerly await the completion 
of the new school as our courses are bursting at the seams and we have long outgrown our classroom 
and performance spaces. Nearly one-third of the students at Wilmington High School participate in 
the Marching Band & Color Guard, Concert Band, Jazz Band, Woodwind Ensemble, Strings 
Attached Orchestra or Choir ensembles. It is in these daily, performance ensemble classes that our 
students have the fullest opportunity to realize their musical skills and abilities, both at the 
individual and collaborative levels. Additional music course offerings include Music Theory I and 
History of Popular Music. Our Strings Attached Orchestra will be touring Ireland in April 2013. 
Wilmington High School students also have ample opportunities to explore the Dramatic Arts with 
several course offerings in Directing, Introduction to Theater and Honors Theater. 

Meaningful demonstration of our high school students' musical and dramatic artistic achievements 
can also be seen in our student directed extra-curricular activities. Among these are the well-known 
a cappella ensemble SoundScape, whose members perform throughout the area, and the recently 
formed Pep Band which is a smaller version of the marching band that performs at and supports our 
Varsity Soccer and Basketball teams at home games. The Drama Club, Lamplighters, provides a 
tremendous opportunity for many students to experience the thrill of live theatrical pei'formance 
from many different angles: technical lighting/sound, stage management, marketing and advertising, 
costume design, set design, choreography and dance as well as singing and acting. The 
Lamplighter's fall production of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar was skillfully modernized to reveal the 
timelessness of themes such as greed, corruption, vengeance and redemption. In May 2013, 
Lamplighter's will present Sondheim's Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street. 

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Acknowledgements 



The Performing Arts faculty respectfully recognize two senior members of our staff who have given 
so much to foster a love for music in so many children in this community, through a combined nearly 
60 years of dedicated service, and who will retire from teaching at the end of this school year, Mrs. 
Deborah Stolar and Mr. Ward Dilmore. They will be missed by their students and colleagues who 
wish them all the best as they begin their next journey in life. 

VISUAL ARTS DEPARTMENT 

Over the past year, the Visual Arts Department has worked diligently to increase the number of 
opportunities available to Wilmington students for showcasing their artwork and exposing them to 
the greater arts community. Additionally, the faculty has collaborated in several workshops to 
develop curriculum incorporating Common Core State Standards and STEAM (STEM plus Art) 
initiatives while further improving upon the existing state and district standards. 

Last spring, the department teamed up with the Wilmington Arts Council to host a student art 
show. Students who won prizes at the WHS Juried Art Show were invited to display their winning 
artwork at the Wilmington Arts Center, along with several pieces selected by each of the Grades K-8 
teachers. Due to the overwhelming success of the show, the department formed a Wilmington 
University workshop aimed at exploring larger venues and developing criteria for selecting even 
more artwork from the district's art classes for the next gallery show scheduled for May 3 rd and 4 th , 
2013 in the Wilmington Middle School cafeteria. 

In addition to the gallery show from last April, the department was invited by the Professional 
Development Committee to display student work at November's CIT day. Although this was the 
first attempt at such an exhibition, the Visual Arts faculty was able to present an array of work from 
across the district for Wilmington staff to enjoy. Based on the positive feedback received, the 
department hopes to reprise their performance for next year's full CIT day, as well as take into 
consideration Superintendent Benton's suggestion for implementing a traveling art show throughout 
the Wilmington Public Schools community. 

While efforts for showcasing student work have been focused largely within the Wilmington area, the 
department did submit work to the prestigious Boston Globe Scholastic Art Awards competition for 
the first time in several years. Last year Wilmington High School submitted seven works, of which 
four students won honorable mentions and one student won a Silver Key. This year, the department 
entered an impressive 22 pieces and a portfolio. Results will be announced at the beginning of 
February 2013. 

As mentioned, the Visual Arts teachers have continued to work on improving the district art 
curriculum. Carroll Conquest has been making strides by collaborating with the Woburn Street 
School classroom teachers on science and math lessons and introducing students to digital painting. 
Also, a number of design students at Wilmington High School recently submitted work to UMass 
Lowell's Cool Science Climate Change Poster Contest. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH 

The Physical Education & Health Department continued to serve all students (K-12). 

The Elementary Physical Education and Health Education Program is a comprehensive curriculum 
which incorporates physical fitness and skill development components as well as specific health 
related topics. The Health Education at the second, third and fourth grade level emphasizes the 
importance of exercise, body systems, hygiene, proper nutrition, personal health care, sun protection, 
rest and sleep to feel well. The students learn to identify major behaviors that contribute to wellness 
through self-esteem, relationships, responsibility, communication and decision making skills. In 
fifth grade, we continue to offer the D.A.R.E. Program in cooperation with the Wilmington Police 
Department and Officer Julie Pozzi. 



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The Middle School Physical Education and Health Education program is a comprehensive 
curriculum which incorporates health topics, physical fitness and sport skill development for all 
students. A popular physical education unit includes the traverse climbing wall at the Wilmington 
Middle School gymnasium and the students continue to be extremely excited about using the 
climbing wall. The climbing wall enhances skills that build strength, endurance and coordination. 
In physical education there is a unit called "Yoga-tation" this combines yoga stretches with 
meditation exercises. In the health education class there is a new lesson within the safety unit 
which informs the students on the topic of an AED device. An AED is an Automated External 
Defibrillator which is used to assist in the rescue of a person. In addition, eighth graders in Ms. 
Federici's Health Education class worked with Mrs. Lomanno in the computer lab on a drug research 
project and creating a website. The students created a website using the Weebly program and 
presented their website to their health class. In the fall, the entire middle school, students and staff, 
participated in the annual team building activity day that enhances positive relationships among 
their school community. At this team building day the entire students and staff participated in team 
building physical activities. In addition, the staff presented the first Second Step lesson for this year 
to the students which include empathy and communication skills. The third activity on this day was 
a book discussion group related to their summer reading assignment. The day was wonderful and 
enjoyed by everyone at the Wilmington Middle School. 

The Physical Education Curriculum at Wilmington High School, Health Dynamics, is a 
comprehensive program dealing with health, fitness and life skills. Students will examine 
appropriate health topics including substance abuse, nutrition, physical fitness, human sexuality, 
mental health and stress management. The curriculum also incorporates effects of the environment, 
consumer issues, ecology and social issues in the program. Related physical activities designed to 
reinforce health issues will be offered to ensure a complete holistic sense of mental, spiritual and 
physical well-being. Yoga continues to be offered within the Physical Education program. Through 
the Wilmington Education Foundation (WEF) Teacher summer grant, Mrs. Nardo was fortunate to 
attend the Mind Body Fitness Conference in Minneapolis, MN. After attending the conference the 
yoga curriculum has been expanded to include a more dynamic sequencing of poses. In addition, a 
new physical education activity that was incorporated this year was Zumba dance. This new 
curriculum unit was a cross curriculum project with the Spanish and sign language classes. 



ATHLETIC DEPARMENT 



The Health Dynamics Department cited several students for Outstanding Achievement in 2012: 
Academic Excellence Awards were presented to the following students: 



Class of 2015 
Class of 2014 
Class of 2013 
Class of 2012 



Ryan Horgan 
Jessica Marciello 
Jeffrey Favuzza 
Matthew Ferreira 



Academic Achievement Awards were presented to the following students: 



Holly Niemiec 
Amber Peach 
Shana Butler 
Casey Murray 
Matthew Diorio 



Athletic Award Recipients 



Dr. Gerald Fagan Award "To the most outstanding Wilmington High School Senior Athlete": 
John Parsons and Emily Crannell 

Lawrence H. Cushing, Sr. Award "To the senior demonstrating dedication to athletics at 
Wilmington High School": Cole Peffer and Jennifer Stewart 



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Harold "Ding" Driscoll Award "To the senior athlete demonstrating dedication to athletics while 
attending Wilmington High School": Dalton Rolli and Cristina Wilson 

Joseph H. Woods, Jr. Memorial Scholarship "To the senior athlete demonstrating courage, 
discipline and tenacity while attending Wilmington High School": Cole Peffer and Jennifer 
Stewart 

Jack Wolfe Memorial Scholarship "To the male and female athlete who exhibit team spirit, 
leadership and equal dedication to academics as well as athletics": Matthew Ferreira, Jennifer 
Stewart and Danielle Parisi 

Dick Scanlon Scholarship: Philip Lentini and Jennifer Stewart 
Hugh Wiberg Scholarship: Matthew Ferreira and Sarah Luz 
The Wildcat Distinguished Service Award: Kathleen Quigley 
Athletic Department Highlights of Winter 2012 

The Boys Basketball team was coached by Joe Maiella. Tim McCarthy and Kyle Albanese were 
Middlesex League All Stars. Tim McCarthy was also named to the Lowell Sun All Star Team. 

The Girls Basketball team, coached by Jay Keane, had a record of 18-5. The team finished first in 
the Freedom Division of the Middlesex League. Emily Crannell and Jennifer Stewart were 
Middlesex League All Stars. Emily Crannell was a Lowell Sun All Star and the MVP of the 
Middlesex League Freedom Division. 




The Boys Ice Hockey team, coached by Stephen Scanlon, had an 
incredible season with a record of 16-4-5. The team won the Division 
II State Championship for the first time in over 60 years. The 
following accolades were given out: Brian Pickett, Middlesex League 
All Star, Cam Owens and Drew Foley were Lowell Sun All Stars. 
Cam Owens was also named the MVP of the State Division II 
Tournament. Coach Scanlon was the Lowell Sun and Boston Globe 
Coach of the Year. Finally, the team was recognized by Mike Lynch 
and Channel 5 as a "High Five" recipient. 



The Wrestling team was coached by Mike Pimental. Alex Furlong was a Lowell Sun All Star as well 
as a State Sectional Champion. 

The Girls Winter Track team was coached by Thomas Bradley. Kelly Hartsough was a Middlesex 
League All Star and also a Lowell Sun All Star. The 4 x 400 Meter Relay Team of Cali Peffer, Rachel 
Alatalo, Alex Bischoff and Kelly Hartsough made the Middlesex League All Star Team. 

Our Boys Winter Track team, coached by Michael Kinney, had the following Middlesex League All 
Star representatives: Steve Halas in the 600, Dave Swider in the 1,000, Eli Jennings in the Shot Put 
and the 4 x 400 Relay Team made up of Steve Halas, Andrew Sears, Patrick Barry and Dave Swider. 

The Baseball team, coached by Aldo Caira, were Middlesex League Champions in the Freedom 
Division. Middlesex League All Stars were John Keough, Dalton Rolli, Philip Lentini and Cole 
Peffer. 

Our Softball team, coached by Audrey Cabral-Pini, had Emily Crannell named to the Middlesex 
League All Star Team. 

The Boys Spring Track team was coached by Michael Kinney. Middlesex League All Stars were Eli 
Jennings in the Shot Put and Discus, Steve Halas in the 800, Killian Smith in the Javelin and 
Patrick Barry in the 400 Hurdles. 



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The Girls Spring Track team was coached by Bree Karow. Middlesex League All Stars were Kelly 
Hartsough in the 800, Rachel Alatalo in the 800, Sydnee Russo in the Mile, Lauren Bennett in the 
Javelin, Kate Cowden in the Shot Put and Michelle Barnes in the 400. The 4 x 400 Relay Team of 
Kelly Hartsough, Rachel Alatalo, Sydnee Russo and Michelle Barnes were All Stars also. 

Boys Lacrosse, coached by Kieran Kavanaugh, had Mitch DeAmbrose named to the Middlesex 
League All Star Team. 

The Girls Lacrosse team, coached by Maura Kee, had Rachael Mara named to the League All Star 
Team. 

The Girls Cross Country team was coached by Thomas Bradley. Callie O'Connell was a Middlesex 
League and Lowell Sun All Star. 

The Boys Cross Country team was coached by Thomas Bradley. Middlesex League All Stars were 
Erik Alatalo, Steve Halas and Andrew Sears. 

The Boys Soccer team was coached by Stephen Scanlon. The team had an overall record of 14-2-5 
and finished first in the Middlesex League Freedom Division. Luke Foley set a new Wilmington 
High School record with 14 shut outs as goaltender. League All Stars were Colin Doherty, Chris 
Michangelo and Kory McGilvray. Colin Doherty was also named the MVP of the Middlesex League, 
Lowell Sun, Eastern Mass All Star and a Boston Globe All Scholastic. 

The Girls Soccer team, coached by Sue Hendee, had an overall record 15-4-3. The team finished first 
in the Middlesex League Freedom Division. Our girls lost in the Division II North final to Belmont. 
Holly Niemiec, Kaitlyn Curley, Alex Bischoff and Lauren McKenna were named to the Middlesex 
League All Star Team. Holly Niemiec was also named to the Lowell Sun and Eastern Mass All Star 
Teams and was also a member of the All State Team. Coach Sue Hendee was named Lowell Sun and 
Boston Globe Division II Coach of the Year. 

Field Hockey, coached by Leanne Ebert, had an overall record of 11-4-5. Emily Colosimo, Katherine 
McKenna and Amanda Richards were Middlesex League All League players. Casey Herra was a 
Lowell Sun All Star. 

The Football team was coached by Mike Barry. Jake Gingras was named to the Middlesex League 
All Star Team. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

During the last academic year, the Special Education Department received 165 referrals for initial 
evaluations and provided special education and related services to 660 eligible students. 

During March 2012, Wilmington Public Schools Special Education Department was visited by 
Program Quality Assurance from the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education as part of 
the Coordinated Program Review. The final report in June 2012 included one commendable area 
and 56 of 59 criterion areas to be fully implemented. 

Also, during the year, Special Education staff members participated in professional development 
activities related to co-teaching, IEP goal writing, related services in the general education 
classroom, differentiated instruction, autism and sensory processing, remediating learning problems 
in math and Applied Behavioral Analysis. The Special Education Parents Advisory Council also 
presented parents and staff with workshops related to Basic Rights, MCAS for students with 
disabilities, What are Tests Testing? and the Anti-Bullying law. 



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SCHOOL FOOD SERVICE DEPARTMENT 



Wilmington School Food Service employs 16 full-time and 25 part-time staff, in addition to the Food 
Service Secretary and the Administrator of Food Services. All salaries, food, supply and equipment 
purchases, as well as most maintenance costs and office supplies are paid from the Food Service 
revolving account. Revenues obtained from student lunch participation, reimbursement from the 
Department of Education, catering, Senior Citizen Lunch, Extended Day Care and other programs 
are used solely for the support and improvement of the School Food Service Program. 

We comply with the United States Department of Agriculture's food based menu-planning system 
and nutrient standards, providing meals that meet 1/3 of the RDA for calories, as well as required 
levels of other key nutrients, including fat, saturated fat, protein, vitamins A & C, iron and calcium. 
Lunch prices for the 2012/2013 school year are as follows: $1.80 at the elementary schools. The 
middle school is $2.05 and the high school is $2.05-2.55. A total of 351,398 student meals were 
served last school year. Students may choose from a variety of lunch options at all grade levels to 
encourage participation. Average monthly participation was approximately 65 percent district-wide. 
In addition, to reimbursable meals, a la carte items are available to students to supplement school 
lunches and those brought from home. A variety of fruits and vegetables are served daily, up to 14 
different choices, many of which are fresh fruits and vegetables. 

Allergy and other health concerns continue to be addressed. Full-time food service employees are 
trained annually in EPI-PEN administration. Cafeteria managers at each school and the 
Administrator of Food Service work closely with school nurses and parents, providing ingredient and 
nutrient information as necessary. At present there are 41 ServSafe certified sanitarians on staff 
including the administrator and food service secretary. All staff have been trained on kitchen safety 
issues, such as lifting, slips and falls. All managers and the administrator have completed an allergy 
awareness certification. 

The food service program continually conducts promotions to increase students' participation in 
lunch, including "Fourth Grade Corn Shucking Day", "Superbowl", "Opening Day", "Cultural Week", 
"Chinese New Year" and "Gobble Gobble Day". 

Computerized Point-of-Sale systems are in place at all schools to improve the efficiency and accuracy 
of reporting and accounting. Participation, especially of students eligible for free and reduced price 
meals, has increased remarkably since this program was introduced and online services are now also 
available. Other initiatives completed during the school year include various equipment and storage 
facility improvements and the purchase of a new steamer and kettle for Wilmington Middle School, 
two new ovens for the high school and Woburn Street School. We also installed a carbon monoxide 
detection system for the Woburn Street School kitchen. 

From July 2011 through June 2012, the senior citizen home-delivered meals program at the West 
Intermediate School served 11,700 lunches. 

WILMINGTON CARES 

Children's Art, Recreation and Enrichment Services 

The CARES Program continues its commitment to providing a 
safe and enriching environment for Wilmington children before 
and after regular school hours. In addition, we offer vacation 
programs for children in grades K-5 from 7:00 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. 
during the February and April breaks as well as approximately 
seven weeks during the summer months. These programs 
continue to grow as the need for our services increases and the 
word gets out that CARES is the place to be! 



Children from Shawsheen Elementary 
School Sewing Club 




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Children at Wildwood Early Childhood Center CARES 
participate in a "Winter Wonderland" afternoon 



West Intermediate School students enjoy a 
chess tournament 



We are currently gearing up for February break at the Woburn Street School, during which our 
qualified staff will enjoy the company of approximately 100 of our local youth each day. The children 
will enjoy activities throughout the week facilitated by our professional staff. There are always 
special trips and activities planned during vacations. In addition, we can all look forward to some 
good 'ole American fun including, sledding (if we get any snow), basketball and a good game of Crazy 
8's. The activities are diverse, so as to appeal to children of all age levels and interests. We strive 
for a balance of physical activities, the arts and cognitive challenges. We will be playing team sports, 
designing our own crafts and exploring the computers. 



CONCLUSION 

Wilmington Public Schools had several retirees this past year, 
many who gave the school system over 25 years of service: 
Kathy Bendel, Barbara Berry, Alice Biase, Jane Caira, 
Patricia Linscott and Joyce Peterson. These staff members 
have been an integral part of the Wilmington Public Schools. 
They have given of themselves to support, nurture and teach 
our students. We would like to wish them many happy and 
healthful retirement years. 

Our sincere thanks to former Town Manager Michael A. 
Caira, present Town Manager Jeffrey M. Hull and his senior 
management staff for their consistent support of the public 
schools. The school department is proud of the collaborative 
efforts and bonds that have been formed with the Town and 
we are most appreciative that the Town continues its 
longstanding commitment to supporting its schools and the 
students within them. After all, they are our future. 




Children at North Intermediate School 
CARES display wild flowers they made 



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HAWSHEEN VALLEY REGIONAL 



VOCATIONAL/TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

The Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical School District is pleased to submit its 2012 
Annual Report to the citizens of Bedford, Billerica, Burlington, Tewksbury and Wilmington. Located 
on Cook Street in Billerica next to the towns of Burlington and Wilmington, the school celebrated its 
42 nd anniversary this year, perpetuating the highest quality in vocational technical education to area 
youth and residents. 

The representatives of the 10 member Regional School Committee that governs the District are: 
Donald Drouin, Secretary, and Glenn Mclntyre from Bedford; Kenneth L. Buffum, Vice Chairman, 
and Paula McShane Lambert, Treasurer, from Billerica; Paul V. Gedick and Robert Gallagher from 
Burlington; Patricia W. Meuse and Michael Kelley from Tewksbury; and James M. Gillis and Robert 
G. Peterson, Chairman, from Wilmington. Charles Lyons has been Superintendent/Director of the 
District since 1987. 

Shawsheen Valley Technical High School (SVTHS) is one of 26 regional vocational technical school 
districts in Massachusetts. One thousand three hundred sixty (1,360) high school students were 
enrolled in SVTHS's day school programs in October of 2012 and more than 400 adults participated 
in the school's various adult and continuing education courses. 

In June of 2012, SVTHS graduated 318 seniors. Over 66 percent of the graduates planned to attend 
college or other post secondary schooling in the fall. Twenty-one percent of the students intended to 
continue working in their trade with another nine percent working in another field after graduation. 
In addition, 4 percent entered the armed forces. 

The SVTHS faculty is an exceptional group of talented academic and vocational/technical educators 
who are highly qualified to teach in their respective disciplines and occupational areas. SVTHS 
employs 138 full-time teachers as well as 18 para-professionals. Of those full-time teachers, 12 are 
department chairs and 15 are lead teachers. All SVTHS teachers exhibit the character, health, 
personality and professional competency worthy of serving the needs of District students. 

Academic Programs 

MCAS Composite Performance Index (CPI) Scores: In the spring of 2012, the 347 sophomores 
comprising SVTHS' Class of 2014 distinguished themselves among all other vocational/technical 
high school students, among all sophomores within the five town district and, most impressively, 
among all sophomores throughout the Commonwealth. 

SVTHS sophomores outperformed all other vocational/technical sophomores in English Language 
Arts and ranked among the top five vocational schools in Mathematics and Science. Within the 
district, SVTHS again outperformed all schools in English Language Arts, ranked fourth in 
Mathematics and second in Science. 

MCAS Growth Scores: Although noteworthy, both the vocational/technical and District analyses 
pale statistically to SVTHS' pre-eminent Median Student Growth Percentiles (MSGP) scores, 
arguably the most important single score in the MCAS analysis. The MSGP is a statistical measure 
of student growth between grades eight and ten. In English Language Arts, SVTHS ranked eighth 
among the 348 school for which the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) 
reported tenth grade MCAS scores in the spring of 2012. This extraordinary achievement, along 
with SVTHS' pre-eminent ratings for each of the other core indicators of scholastic performance, 
earned SVTHS a special commendation from the DESE for a third consecutive year. 

Curriculum Revision: In response to the curriculum change promulgated by the Massachusetts Core 
Curriculum, the design and sequence of course offerings at SVTHS are changing to support earlier 
access to College Preparatory (CP) Mathematics courses. The ongoing revision resulted in the 



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introduction of CP Algebra I, Level 2 and CP Algebra I, Level 3 courses designed cooperatively by a 
team of regular and special education faculty. SVTHS offered the former course for the first time in 
the fall of 2011. The latter course will be offered in the fall of 2013. In addition, CP Geometry, Level 
2 is scheduled for implementation in the fall of 2013. 

New Staff: In the fall of 2012, Jenn Elwell, Catherine Peterson and Patrick Reed joined SVTHS' 
English Department. Both Ms. Elwell and Ms. Peterson had previously served as instructional aides 
in the department. Mr. Reed, a Bedford native, previously taught in Washington, DC. Kristin 
Lamarre, a recent graduate of Plymouth State University, joined the Science Department to teach 
Biology and Chemistry. Jeffrey McGrath, a Bedford resident and recent UMass Lowell graduate, 
was hired as a Mathematics teacher in January to fill a vacancy that resulted from the mid-year 
retirement of Mr. Andrew Clark. Finally, Peter Udstuen, who formerly taught in Methuen and 
Nashua, and Ronald Fusco, Jr., a recent Springfield College graduate, joined the Social Studies 
Department. 

Summer School: In the summer of 2012, the SVTHS Summer Program enrolled 125 students from 
ten surrounding school systems in 22 courses offered to students in grades seven through ten. All 
courses were on-site, face-to-face offerings that provided the frequency and depth of teacher 
interaction necessary and predictable for students attempting (a) to recover credit for courses that 
they previously failed, or (b) to earn College Preparatory credit by upgrading courses in which they 
were enrolled during the regular school year. Individuals seeking summer school information should 
contact Mr. Kevin Bloom, Summer Coordinator, at 978-671-3631. 

Infrastructure Renovations: The completion of SVTHS' state-of-the-art Life-Science wing and the 
migration of the Health program to that new facility made available to academic programs three 
rooms previously occupied by the Health shop in the school's mall area. Extensive summer 
renovations to those rooms converted a small Health lab to a larger academic science lab. A second 
area was converted to a science classroom and a third area became a social studies classroom. In 
addition to these changes, installation of ceiling- mounted LED projectors, interactive white boards 
and mimio technology continued throughout the building. 

Clubs and Organizations 

Classes: Culminating a yearlong series of successful social events and thoughtfully devised 
fundraisers, which included initiatives to raise supplies for American soldiers in war zones, each of 
the four classes held memorable formal and semi-formal events. Under the direction of their advisor, 
Stacy LaBella, the senior class planned and enjoyed an elegant senior prom at the Woburn Hilton. 
Junior class advisor, Marygrace Ferrari, and her junior class officers planned and held a gala prom 
at the Crestview in Woburn. The sophomore class, advised by Jay Tildsley and Greg Bendel, and the 
freshman class, advised by Angela Caira and Celeste Joudrey, collaborated on the annual Spring 
Fling semi-formal, which was held at the school. 

The 13th Annual Shawsheen Turkey Bowl, the much anticipated flag-football game between the 
junior and senior girls, was once again a successful holiday event which raised donations of cash and 
food for the Billerica Food Pantry. 

Literary Magazine: For the fifth consecutive year, Shawsheen's literary magazine, Ramblings, 
received awards for excellence by a major educational organization, including the New England 
Scholastic Press Association (NESPA) affiliated with Boston University's College of Communication, 
the National Council of Teachers of English, and the Columbia University Scholastic Press 
Association. These distinguished awards recognize the special talents of the SVTHS students who 
supplied the content and designed the layout of the annual publication under the supervision of Ms. 
Kristin Sciacca of the English Department and Mr. Doug Michaud of the Technical 
Illustration/Commercial Art shop. 



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School Newspaper: In a model school-wide collaborative effort, Ms. Christy McKee of the English 
Department, Mr. Doug Michaud of the Technical Illustration shop and Messrs. Tim Broadrick and 
Tom Struthers of the Graphics Art shop produced six editions of the Rampage that presented the 
school year's major events in artistic design and thoughtful narrative. 

National Honor Society: Under the advisorship of Mrs. Gail Poulten of the English Department, the 
SVTHS chapter of the National Honor Society inducted 34 eleventh and twelfth graders in March of 
2012. Middlesex County Sheriff Peter Koutoujian was the guest speaker at the induction ceremony. 
Throughout the year, members of the Honor Society thoughtfully and enthusiastically participated 
in a broad array of community service and they travelled to Newport, RI, Salem, MA and the 
Museum of Science to visit cultural and historic sites. 

Student Council: The Student Council continued its energetic paper recycling program throughout 
the year under the direction of faculty advisor Ms. Ellen Mountain. In 2012, Ms. Mountain 
continued the Council's recently expanded efforts to recycle plastic, toner cartridges, cell phones and 
sneakers. In addition, the Council sponsored fundraisers for the American Cancer Society, local 
animal shelters and other noteworthy causes. 

The Traveling Rams: During April vacation, Ms. Sciacca and her enthusiastic globe trotters traveled 
to Italy, emerging themselves in the urban culture of Rome and Sorrento. Interested world travelers 
or their parents should contact Ms. Sciacca at 978-667-2111 x577 or ksciacca@shawsheen.tec. ma. us. 

Oratory Club: Coached by faculty advisor, Kristin Sciacca of the English Department, club members 
participated in three local contests; the Voice of Democracy Speech Contest sponsored by Veterans of 
Foreign Wars, the annual Lions Club Competition and the SkillsUSA state competition at which 
junior Katelyn Gordon captured a third place medal. 

Robotics Club: The ten member team competed in two First Tech Challenge (FTC) robotics 
competitions, showing a just miss in the Arlington competition and a solid showing at Bridgewater. 
The Robotics Club also competed in Trebuchet competitions, placing third in New England at the 
annual Technology Festival Trebuchet competition, while capturing a first place for the "most 
innovative design using modern technology". The team received their first place medal at the 
Higgins Museum Trebuchet competition where they were the only high school competing against 
colleges and various other organizations. The Club also attended a national competition at the 
Verizon Arena in Manchester, NH. 

Mathematics Club and Science Club: The Mathematics Club, advised by Ms. Debra Dew of the 
Mathematics Department, and the Science Club, advised by Ms. Angel Hardy of the Science 
Department, continued to engage participants in co-curricular activities complementing their 
advanced study of those disciplines. The Mathematics Club practiced for, and participated in, not 
only a series of competitions hosted by district schools but also a special invitational competition 
sponsored and hosted by Worcester Polytechnic Institute. The Science Club participated in after 
school activities that broadened participants' understanding of scientific theory and applications. 
Mathematics enthusiasts should contact Ms. Dew at ddew@shawsheen.tec.ma.us; science 
enthusiasts should contact Ms. Hardy at ahardy@shawsheen.tec.ma.us. 

Outdoor Club and Ski Club: Introduced in 2010 to SVTHS, to fill the conspicuous void in 
recreational, extra-curricular options the Outdoor Club and the Ski Club enjoyed immediate and 
broad popularity. Throughout three New England seasons, the Outdoor Club, advised by Jessica 
Cook of the Social Studies Department, planned six overnight climbs of Mount Washington in New 
Hampshire. The Ski Club, co-advised by Kelly McFadden of the Guidance Department and Doug 
Michaud of the Technical Illustration Shop, planned a series of after school ski trips to the Nashoba 
Valley Ski Area in Westford, MA. Interested mountain climbers should contact Ms. Cook at 
jcook@shawsheen.tec.ma.us, and interested skiers or boarders of any experience level should contact 
Mr. Gerry Perriello, the club's new advisor, at gperriello@shawsheen.tec.ma.us or his co-advisor, Mr. 
Matthew Day, at mday@shawsheen.tec.ma.us. 



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Parent Advisory Council: Once again, graduation day culminated in a well-attended all-night party 
sponsored and organized by the SVTHS Parent Advisory Council under the direction of its faculty 
advisor, Mr. Ronald Fusco, and its chair, Mrs. Denise Illsley. Parents interested in joining this most 
worthwhile parents' group should contact co-chairs Linda Tedford (lindatedford@verizon.net) or 
JoAnn Brace (jbrace@shawsheen.tec.ma.us). 

Alumni Association: Under the direction of its planning committee and faculty advisor, Mrs. Gail 
Poulten, the Alumni Association vetted nominations, selected honorees and hosted an Alumni Hall of 
Fame induction at the Tewksbury Country Club. Any SVTHS alumni interested in planning future 
events with Mrs. Poulten should contact her at gpoulten@shawsheen.tec.ma.us or 978-667-2111 
x584. 

Support Services 

The SVTHS Support Services Department services the second largest population of students with 
special needs in Vocational Education within Massachusetts, approximately 344 students and 
comprising about 25.6% of our student body. The most frequently occurring area of need is the 
category of Specific Learning Disability which reflects that many students have a history of academic 
difficulties upon their arrival at Shawsheen. Nevertheless, SVTHS has had a strong graduation rate 
of this group of students with 97.8% of seniors graduating in June, 2012, among the highest of any 
high school in Massachusetts. This compares to a state average of 65.6% percent for special needs 
students. 

Shawsheen's special education students also demonstrated outstanding success on the spring, 2012 
MCAS examinations. These results have occurred as a result of a "team" effort on the part of 
Academic, Vocational/Technical and Support Services staff to address the needs of our special 
education population. The rate of special education students who attained either Advanced or 
Proficient MCAS scores was extremely high on each of the three examinations; English Language 
Arts (94%), Mathematics (62%) and Biology (61%). These percentages are approximately triple the 
rate of statewide special education averages. 

The Support Services Department is now led by Dr. Frank D. Scott, who assumed the Director 
position in July, 2011. Dr. Scott has provided training to keep staff informed of the most current 
requirements and best practices as a result of revisions to federal and state legislation and 
regulations. Updates continue also with the eSped software which Shawsheen has adopted to write 
Individualized Educational Plans (IEPs) and supporting documentation. In addition, the Support 
Services Department continues to implement various forms of technology that allow for equal access 
to the curriculum for all learners. A professional development initiative occurred in March, 2012, to 
familiarize all of Shawsheen's staff members with meeting student needs by incorporating the 
principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL). An in-service workshop was presented by Dr. 
Todd Rose through the Center for Applied Special Technologies (CAST), a recognized leader in the 
field of UDL. 

Athletics 

The three seasons comprising the 2012 athletic year were memorable and unique for Shawsheen's 
Athletics. Over 450 Shawsheen students participated in interscholastic athletics, earning ten league 
championships and five state vocational titles. 

The overall winning percentage of the varsity teams ranked among the highest in school history. 
Fourteen teams, in fact, qualified for post-season play. Dozens of students were honored with All- 
Star recognition by the Commonwealth Athletic Conference and the Lowell Sun. Wrestler Devonn 
Pratt won the Division One State Championship in the 138 pound weight class. Two members of the 
record breaking football team received All Scholastic honors. Paul DePlacido was named Boston 
Globe All Scholastic and Devonn Pratt was named Herald All Scholastic. 

For an unprecedented ninth time in ten years, SVTHS earned the Markham Award from the Boston 
Globe in recognition of its status as the most outstanding vocational technical high school athletic 
program in Massachusetts. The award is a reflection of the commitment and talent of all those 
associated with the SVTHS athletic program. 



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Community Services 



Adult Evening School: The Adult Evening School offered a wide variety of vocational/technical 
courses for adults interested in expanding their knowledge and skills. Courses are offered during 
both the fall and winter semesters, with enrollment exceeding five hundred adult learners during the 
past year. Interested residents should contact Mr. Russ Eckel, Workforce Development and 
Community Services Coordinator, at (978) 671-3788 for information and/or a brochure. 

School of Practical Nursing: The 2011-2012 year graduated 36 Practical Nurses (PN). Since its 
inception, a total of 599 students have successfully continued on to a rewarding career as Licensed 
Practical Nurses. This intense ten-month program offers a combination of evening and weekend 
coursework and clinical externship experiences. Preparation for the state LPN exam is also 
included. Residents interested in applying to the PN program are urged to contact the Director of 
the School of Practical Nursing, Ms. Patricia Noonan, at (978) 671-3646. 

Project Explore: Nearly 450 middle school students from the District participated in after school 
career awareness activities during the 2012 winter semester. Students explored a variety of career 
path options. This program is coordinated with area middle school guidance counselors. The 
program is free of charge. Busing is provided by SVTHS. For registration materials or general 
information, interested residents should contact Ms. Christina Palmer at 978-671-3612. 

Swim Program: SVTHS energetically continued its water aerobics, lap swim, parent-and-me swim 
class and swim lessons during the 2011-2012 year. The Shawsheen's pool also continues to serve as 
the home site for interscholastic high school swim teams from Billerica, Bedford and Burlington 
public schools. Individuals seeking swim program information should contact Ms. Jill Branley, 
Aquatic Director, at (978) 671-3699. 

Bille?'ica House of Correction: The Billerica House of Correction's (BHOC) Education Director leads 
all prison education initiatives beyond the already established Culinary Arts program. SVTHS 
continues to collaborate through Workforce Development and Community Services Coordinator, 
Russ Eckel, with BHOC to expand its educational goals to inmates. SVTHS looks forward to 
maintaining its relationship with BHOC by providing technical assistance and end-of-course 
assessment services that will validate inmate achievement of course objectives. 

Middlesex Community College: SVTHS continued its partnership with the Hospitality Management 
Department of Middlesex Community College to deliver four courses at Shawsheen Tech as part of 
the requirements for its Culinary Arts Certificate or Associates in Science Degree option. Student 
enrollment was strong in 2012 and the program received exemplary student evaluations. 
Discussions to expand technical course offerings are currently being explored by the MCC 
Hospitality Dean and SVTHS Workforce Development and Community Services Coordinator, Mr. 
Russ Eckel. 

Computer Services 

During the 2012 year, Computer Services completed all DESE data collection requirements. These 
reports included Student Information Management System (SIMS) data, Education Personnel 
Information Management System (EPIMS) data, Student Course Schedule (SCS) data, School Safety 
and Discipline Report (SSDR) data, the Annual Technology Report data and the Vocational 
Technical Competency Tracking System (VTCTS) data. In addition to these required state reports, 
Shawsheen submitted the results of a district Technology Readiness Survey mandated by PARCC. 
The purpose of this report is to identify the status of school districts participating in on-line 
assessment in 2014. 

In the fall, Computer Services added the current ninth grade population (class of 2016) to the Parent 
Access Manager System, bringing parent participation to approximately 81 percent. The Parent 
Access Manager allows parents to view up-to-date information on their children in the areas of 
attendance, grades, rankbook, schedules and discipline information. Parents can also view the 
teacher's iPass Rankbook which includes more detail on the students' progress. 



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As part of Computer Services four year Computer Replacement Plan, computer labs for Design & 
Visual Communications, Machine Shop, Room 51 IB, Room 109, Business Tech Lab 296 and the 
Library received upgrades with the latest computer models during 2012. 

Computer Services continues to maintain its virtualized server solution to run a more energy 
efficient infrastructure. Computer Services decided to upgrade many of Shawsheen's computers to 
Microsoft's Windows 7 Operating System. This upgrade was to utilize energy saving features within 
the Operating System and due to Microsoft's decision to no longer support our previous Windows XP 
Operating System. This advancement was further supported by an energy consultant's 
recommendations in moving Shawsheen to a more energy efficiency environment. Over 700 
computers were upgraded with the Operating System. All computers capable of the upgrade also 
had Office 2010 and Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 installed. 

Wireless network infrastructure has been implemented within the building to expand our existing 
coverage. One hundred access points were installed in classrooms, offices and labs. This was 
connected to the existing 16 access point infrastructure in the Life Science wing to provide complete 
wireless coverage of Shawsheen's building. 

Guidance 

Admissions: Applications once again exceeded 600 for 350 seats in the class of 2016. This year, 
presentations occurred in all the Billerica, Wilmington, Tewksbury, Bedford and Burlington middle 
schools. Students, parents and community members were invited to events on-site including the 
Community Open House in November and the 8 th Grade Career Night in January. 

9 th Grade Orientation: The Class of 2016 participated in SVTHS 9 th grade orientation program, 
Fresh Start. This exceptional program, gave new students an opportunity to meet each other and 
become familiar with the school, its programs and staff through an interactive and fun day of 
events. Since the Guidance Department implemented the freshman transition program in 2006, 
with the support of the Superintendent and School Committee, attendance has continued to improve 
and withdrawals have decreased substantially. A mentoring program to help with transition was 
implemented using the same student leaders who helped deliver the orientation day. 

College and Career Planning: Shawsheen students continue to expand their options and 
opportunities after graduation. Studies conducted this year show a growing trend for SVTHS 
students to attend and remain at four year colleges and universities. In addition, SVTHS met federal 
benchmarks this year for graduates in all programs. This included positive placement in 
employment, college and military careers. SVTHS offered preparatory programs for both Accuplacer 
and SAT college exams. Over 75 percent of the senior class participated in one or the other. SVTHS 
continues to offer a foreign language to students pursuing college programs that have this 
requirement. The course is offered after school and evenings. The college fair this year included 
over 70 colleges and universities and a special workshop was offered to students with special 
education needs to understand their options for post secondary learning. Over 500 students and 
parents participated in this largest-to-date event. 

Scholarships and Awards: Despite the tough economy, SVTHS students were awarded over 
$107,000 in scholarship funds. A graduate was also the recipient of the Massachusetts Vocational 
Association scholarship award. 

Cooperative Education Program: Cooperative education built momentum this fall with many of the 
vocational/technical programs increasing cooperative education placement by 50 percent or more. 
The trend continues as the placement office has currently secured cooperative education positions for 
more than 145 students. 

Student Health: SVTHS complied with the state mandate to conduct BMI testing on all 10 ,h graders. 



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School Council 



An important agency of school governance, the 2012-2013 SVTHS School Council, is made up of 
parents, Susan Berry, Dawn Pfaff and Gayle Razzaboni from Billerica, community members, Bob 
Lazott of Billerica, Jean Perry of Burlington and Cosmo Ciccariello of Burlington; two SVTHS 
students, Jennie Galante and John Robinson; faculty members, Robert Roach and Jason Tildsley; 
and co-chair Dr. Robert Cunningham, Assistant Superintendent-Director/Principal. 

The three primary functions of the school council are to meet with the Superintendent/Director when 
he presents the school budget, make additions and revisions to the SVTHS Student Handbook and 
develop the annual School Improvement Plan. 

Technical Programs 

SkillsUSA: SkillsUSA is a national non-profit organization preparing students for careers in trade, 
technology and skilled service occupations. SVTHS earned 62 medals at the 2012 district 
competition and 18 medals at the state competition, including eight gold medals. Nine SVTHS 
students went on to the national competition in Kansas City, MO with all of the students placing no 
lower than seventh place. Medical Assisting earned a second gold medal, while Career Pathways 
(Graphic Arts) finished fourth and Entrepreneurship (Business Technology) finished a strong 
seventh. 

National Accreditation: SVTHS has 20 vocational programs, eight of which are nationally accredited 
by their respective industries. The programs include: Automotive Technology, Auto Collision, 
Machine Technology, Metal Fabrication, Culinary Arts, Graphic Communication, Drafting 
Technology and Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration. 

Transportation Cluster 

Auto Collision: The Auto Collision program maintains its high standards and quality of outstanding 
work with a plethora of automobiles in need of body work for clients throughout the district. The 
shop was redesigned to accommodate the installation of two new prep stations in compliance with 
the new clean air regulations. The upper classmen participated in National Automotive Technicians 
Education Foundation (NATEF) Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) testing for the first time and 
did an outstanding job. Students fared well in the SkillsUSA regional competition, winning a silver 
medal in Refinishing and finishing first, second and third in the Collision competition. Through the 
capital budget process, the program will acquire a new frame machine. 

Automotive Technology: The Automotive program continues to do an outstanding job repairing 
vehicles from within the district. Automotive Technology students competed in the Ford AAA Auto 
Skills competition and participated in Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Student Certification 
and ASE Refrigerant Recovery programs. The Automotive program participated in several post 
secondary career days and industry field trips, exposing students to career opportunities and 
technologies in the field. These field experiences included trips to Massachusetts Bay Community 
College, Universal Technical Institute, New England Institute of Technology and Benjamin Franklin 
Institute of Technology. Through the capital budget process the program acquired a new Hunter 
four-post alignment lift. 

Service Cluster 

Health Assisting, Dental Assisting and Medical Assisting moved into their new home in the Life 
Science Wing in September 2012. Dental Assisting accepted its first class of 15 students in April and 
added a second full-time instructor. Dental Assisting has acquired state-of-the-art equipment 
including a functioning computer generated digital radiology lab. Medical Lab Assisting has 
expanded its curriculum to include Clinical Medical Assisting, Administrative Medical Assisting and 
the necessary laboratory skills to function in a Biotechnology Assistant role. The junior curriculum 
now includes a course in Pharmacology. The addition of a third Medical Assistant instructor with 



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laboratory skills has strengthened this area of study. These programs look forward to graduating 
their first class in 2013 and are actively pursuing co-operative placements for their students. All 26 
Health Assisting students passed the Massachusetts Department of Public Health state certified 
Nurse Assistant test and are currently employed as seniors in many assisted living and long-term 
care facilities. The addition of the Sim Man has enriched simulation in the laboratory experience. 
Many students furthering their education in the dental, laboratory or nursing fields will benefit from 
the use of simulation while in a high school setting, increasing their critical thinking skills. 
Partnerships with several community agencies including Tewksbury Hospital, Lahey Clinic, Sunny 
Acres Nursing and Rehabilitation Center and Woodbriar of Wilmington have positively impacted our 
student's growth. 

Culinary Arts: An articulation agreement with Johnson and Wales University has provided 
opportunities for senior Culinary Arts students to attend classes full-time through their Freshman 
Advanced Study Track (FAST) option. This is the third consecutive year in which SVTHS has placed 
a senior in the FAST program. SVTHS also renewed its Articulation agreements with Central 
Maine College, Lincoln Institute of Hartford, Middlesex Community College and Cambridge 
Culinary Institute. The Culinary Arts department visited Lincoln Institute in Hartford, Connecticut 
and has planned another trip in April to the prestigious Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, 
New York. Through the Capital Budget process and at the recommendation of its Craft Advisory 
Board, the Culinary Arts program purchased a new 18 bay salad bar unit to accommodate the 
serving of nutritious lunch options, two new double door reach-in coolers for the kitchen and one 
double door reach-in cooler for the bakery. Both purchases added to another successful year of 
providing meals and bakery goods to the public. 

Cosmetology: The Cosmetology students served hundreds of patrons from the community in the on- 
site student clinic that continues to provide the training requisite for student success in the trade. 
In addition to serving the local community, the students provided community service to local senior 
centers and assisted living communities. Catherine Hinds Institute of Esthetics welcomed SVTHS 
students back this year for tours of their facility and a complimentary service in order to broaden the 
student interest in pursuing licenses in related fields. Elizabeth Grady, another skin care institute, 
offered complimentary services to junior and senior students. One hundred percent of SVTHS 
Cosmetology students participated in SkillsUSA. A sophomore student competed at the district 
level, capturing a bronze medal in the nail category. All 19 senior Cosmetology students graduated 
with a Massachusetts Class 1 Cosmetology license and 12 were successfully placed on co-op within 
the school year. 

Construction Cluster 

Carpentry, Plumbing, Electrical, Heating, Ventilation, Air-conditioning & Refrigeration and 
Masonry: Construction projects within the community continue to be a large part of SVTHS' project- 
based curriculum. All five construction programs work collaboratively with the district's five towns. 
This year's projects notably included the final phase of the Marion Tavern Farmhouse project in 
Burlington and the Tewksbury Council on Aging Kiln and Pottery Building. The Construction 
Cluster, which also contributes to the daily projects within and around the school, is currently 
supporting the construction of a multi-tier retaining wall and a field house on the softball and soccer 
fields. Other notable projects include construction of a 10' x 12' shed for the school's sand & salt, 
construction of work stations in the Masonry and Carpentry programs, construction of a 
classroom/computer lab in the Machine Shop and repairs in the Cosmetology and Electronics Shops. 

Arts and Communication Services Cluster 

Business Technology: The Business Technology program acquired a Microsoft Testing Lab. SVTHS 
students now have an opportunity throughout the school year to certify in various Microsoft 
applications that are industry based, enhancing their employability skills. With the addition of this 
lab, 17 seniors were certified in Microsoft Word, Excel or PowerPoint. Additionally, 23 juniors 
obtained their certifications in these same areas. Going forward, the program's testing lab will allow 
students to certify in Quickbooks and Dreamweaver as well. The Business Technology program 
continues to evolve and thrive, staying current with industry changes. 



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Informational Support Services & Networking: Sixty percent of SVTHS seniors were placed in co-op 
positions, which was one of the school's best placement years. It was the first year that both Cisco 
and Test Out curriculum were implemented for our sophomores, which proved to be very successful. 
One ISSN senior, Jessica Kenny, was the class of 2012 valedictorian and was also accepted to MIT. 
These accomplishments were primarily due to her attitude and dedication to her goals. A second 
Internet connection was added to the shop that was dedicated to our Computer Management 
Services program where customer equipment is repaired by the seniors. We also implemented 
VMware in all grades that teaches students about computer visualization and is one of the fastest 
growing technologies in corporate environments today. A number of ISSN seniors obtained college 
credits at the schools of their choice as a result of their completing the Cisco curriculum. 

Design & Visual Communications: The Design & Visual Communications program had a very strong 
and busy year. Students participated in many community projects for schools, town governments 
and non-profit organizations. Students within the program played a key role in developing a 
corporate identity program for a nonprofit organization called the Middlesex 3 Coalition. All 
students participated in the brand development for this organization serving the towns of Billerica, 
Bedford, Burlington, Chelmsford and Lowell. The culmination of their efforts produced the logo 
design and brochure for this organization. This newly formed Middlesex 3 Coalition shares a 
common goal of fostering economic development, job growth and diversification of the tax base. The 
relationship the Design & Visual Communications Department has built with key members of this 
organization will help to play a critical role in fostering co-op opportunities for many of the students 
from Shawsheen. The program was also equipped with new MAC computers to enhance the industry 
simulated learning environment. 

Graphic Communications: The Graphics program enjoyed a year of great success in the pressroom 
and in its community partnerships. Graphics produced a record number of live jobs for schools, town 
governments and nonprofit organizations. Through these endeavors, students had an excellent 
opportunity to experience the real world pressures and rewards of working in a printing company. 
The program received a national literary magazine award for their publication of Ramblings. The 
program also acquired and implemented into its curriculum new silk screening equipment, which 
has opened new avenues for student cooperative education placements. 

Electro/Mechanical Cluster 

Computer Aided Design & Drafting: The Drafting shop has been busy this year in supporting the 
construction cluster on a variety of projects. These major projects included drawing support for the 
Soccer Field House and various offsite construction drawings. In addition, the Drafting program has 
completed drawings for the Maintenance Department, including a rooftop units' map, cafeteria/gym 
table and chair layouts, sprinkler head map and numerous other drawing requests. The Program 
also completed a control station layout for the Tewksbury Water Treatment Plant. Through the 
capital budget process, the Drafting program was able to purchase new related room tables and 
paint the shop's work stations. Two students received silver medals, one for Architectural Drafting 
and the other for Technical Drafting, at the SkillsUSA State Competition. The 2011-2012 school 
year ended with 13 out of 20 students working at cooperative education jobs. All graduating seniors 
entered either a two or four year college. More than half of the seniors from the Class of 2013 are 
currently employed in cooperative education jobs. 

Electronics: The Electronics program will move forward in training and certifying students to the J- 
STD-001E IPC Standard. One hundred percent of the seniors successfully passed the Application 
Specialist course and received an official certificate from IPC. A number of students participated in 
SkillsUSA competition with Shawsheen Electronics taking second place at the regional competition. 
Electronics students finished third at the annual Trebuchet competition at Windham High School. 
The department took the first step in introducing Quality Control Management, Flowcharting and 
Software Programming and a seven step design process used by industrial engineers. 



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Machine Technology: The Machine Technology program continues to implement positive changes to 
a growing program. The initiatives of the program's newest instructor, Mr. Lawrence Retelle, have 
enhanced the freshman exploratory program, increasing the number of freshmen opting for Machine 
Technology as a first choice to a point exceeding the shop's capacity. There are now 18 high energy 
sophomores that will soon be the next generation of machinists. Due to this growth, the decision was 
made to build a classroom/computer lab in the shop. Construction began over the summer. Twenty 
wireless laptops were purchased, with the addition of Mastercam X6 as well as a smartboard. A 
partnership with Massachusetts Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MassMEP) is in process, 
which would provide specialized training for adults working with local employers after the regular 
school day. Two new 2 Axis Prototrak CNC controls have been installed on Bridgeport Milling 
Machines. Students had success again at the SkillsUSA district level. Co-op numbers continue to be 
strong. The Advisory Board has shown a marked increase with new advisors looking for student 
hires. 

Metal Fabrication and Welding: Metal Fabrication has worked on numerous welding and sheet 
metal projects that supported multiple school clusters and the community at large. This work 
included duct work for new related room, a library drop box project, new Autobody ramps, a stool 
repair for M.C.I. Billerica and the Go-Cart project. For the second consecutive year, SVTHS hosted 
the annual open house for the Boston Chapter of the American Welding Society (AWS). Two new 
swing-arm ventilation hoods were approved through the capital budget process. Mitre Corporation 
donated various pieces of equipment to our program, including a four foot hydraulic press brake, 
large capacity box and pan brake and a vertical band saw. 

Conclusion and Acknowledgement 

The SVTHS Committee, staff and students gratefully appreciate the support that they receive from 
the residents of the five-member District. The SVTHS family especially acknowledges the continued 
financial support of the local town managers, finance committees and town meetings, who 
collectively ensure and perpetuate the highest quality in vocational/technical training opportunities 
for area youth. 

The District is grateful for the significant contributions provided by SVTHS staff and employees and 
acknowledges the many contributions of the SVTHS staff who retired during 2012. Those retirees 
are: Andrew Botticelli, Computer Aided Design & Drafting; Andrew Clark, Mathematics; Patricia 
Hebert, Social Studies and William Jackson, Electronics. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 




In 2012, the department continued to deal with a slowed economy and a reduced pace of activity. 
The Planning Board and Conservation Commission continued abbreviated schedules meeting once a 
month. When activity increases, each will resume a regular schedule of meeting twice a month. 
Provision of service to the community in the areas of planning, conservation, housing, transportation 
and other community development activities continued. The Planning Board remains responsible for 
administration of the Subdivision Control Act and Site Plan Review, issuance of Special Permits for 
Conservation Subdivisions, Chapter 81G road improvement projects, Over-55 housing, multi-family 
units in the Central Business District, signage and lots having less than 10,000 square feet of land, 
permits for Stormwater Management, recommendations on zoning amendments, cases before the 
Board of Appeals and specific planning studies. The Conservation Commission continues to be 
responsible for wetlands protection in accordance with the state Wetlands Protection Act. The 
Commission is also responsible for management of the Town's Open Space Land and for acquiring 
additional land for passive recreation. Department staff provides assistance to both the Planning 
Board and the Conservation Commission. 



-Ill- 



Carole Hamilton is the Director of Planning and Conservation. She staffs the Planning Board. She 
chairs the Community Development Technical Review Team and the Property Review Board, 
coordinating the review of development projects and the disposition of town-owned land. She serves 
as the point person for review of 40B affordable housing projects and provides input to the Board of 
Appeals. This year she was appointed to the Yentile Farm Development Committee which is 
assessing options for Town use of this newly acquired acreage. The Director serves as the 
representative to the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP), the Metropolitan Area Planning 
Council (MAPC) and the North Suburban Planning Council (NSPC), acting as the liaison between 
the town and the state on transportation and planning issues. 

Winifred McGowan serves as the Assistant Director of Planning & Conservation and provides 
technical assistance to the Conservation Commission and the department on wetland and 
environmental issues. Michael C. Vivaldi serves as Assistant Planner. Senior Clerks Cheryl 
Licciardi and Elizabeth Lawrenson provide administrative support. 

Planning Board Activity 

The responsibilities of the Planning Board include review of subdivision and "Approval Not 
Required" plans; review of commercial and industrial site plans; issuance of Special Permits for 
Conservation Design Subdivisions, multi-family units in the Central Business District, Over-55 
housing, lots having less than 10,000 square feet, Chapter 81G roadway improvements and signage, 
permits for Stormwater Management, recommendations to the Board of Appeals on variances and 
special permits, strategic and comprehensive planning, zoning amendments and implementation of 
the Master Plan. 

Planning Board members, appointed by the Town Manager for five-year terms, are Michael 
Sorrentino (Chairman), Ann Yurek (Clerk), Randi Holland, Christopher Neville and James Banda, 
Jr. Brian Corrigan stepped down as a member to move to Andover. 

Subdivision Control 

Under the authority vested in the Planning Board of the Town of Wilmington by M.G.L. Chapter 41, 
Section 81-Q, the Board reviews subdivisions. This year no subdivisions, conventional or 
conservation designs, were submitted for review. Two previously approved subdivisions; Cheyenne 
Estates off Woburn Street and McGrane Woods off McDonald Road, were amended. Cheyenne 
Estates submitted a modified drainage system. McGrane Woods redesigned the septic locations on 
the majority of lots and modified the drainage system. Both amended subdivision requests were 
approved. 

Seven (7) "Approval Not Required" (ANR) plans were submitted. The Planning Board determined 
that the subdivision of land did not require approval under the Subdivision Control Law and the 
plans were endorsed. Nine new building lots were created by these plans. Four of the plans changed 
lot lines and created no new lots. 

Site Plan Review 

Six (6) new site plan review applications for commercial and industrial projects were submitted. 
Two projects were approved with conditions by the Planning Board; the four remaining are pending 
action by the Board. The approved proposals will allow an outdated commercial building to be 
demolished and a new building constructed in its place. The second is to relocate the entrance of a 
manufacturing complex by constructing a new driveway and adding some parking at the former 
Acme site. The pending applications are two newly created commercial uses, one on Main Street and 
one on Eames Street. Another pending application will expand the use of a gas station on Lowell 
Street and the final will allow the reuse of a long time vacant building on Main Street near Silver 
Lake. 

Stormwater Management Permits 

Full Stormwater Management Permits are required for projects disturbing 20,000 square feet of land 
or more, while Simple Stormwater Management Permits are issued for projects causing less land 
disturbance, such as additions of 600 square feet or more. This year, 41 applications for simple 
permits were received and 11 for full permits. Greater coordination between those departments 



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involved in the development process has been one benefit of the new By-law. Full permits for 
projects disturbing 20,000 square feet of land or more require a public hearing. Those projects 
needing to file a Notice of Intent with the Conservation Commission are heard in conjunction with 
the public hearing for the Notice of Intent. Others are heard by the Planning Board in conjunction 
with a public hearing for Site Plan Review. Simple Stormwater applications are handled 
administratively by Planning & Conservation staff. 

Of the simple permits submitted only one is pending. Of the 11 full permits all, except two, were 
approved with conditions. The remaining two applications are pending a decision. 

Zoning 

In accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 40A, the Planning Board holds required statutory public 
hearings on proposed amendments to the Zoning By-law and Map and submits formal reports and 
recommendations to Town Meeting voters. Those recommendations are included in this Annual 
Report under "Town Meeting." 

Conservation Commission Activity 

The Wilmington Conservation Commission is charged with upholding the interests of the 
Massachusetts Wetland Protection Act. The Commission received 46 filings for activities under the 
jurisdiction of the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection (M.G.L. Chapter 131, Section 40 and its 
regulations at 310 CMR 10.00) in 2012. 

Wilmington has an abundance of these wetland resource areas, including banks, bordering vegetated 
wetlands (swamps, marshes, etc.), land under water bodies and riverfront areas. Activities reviewed 
by the Commission can include tree removal and landscaping and construction of houses, driveways, 
additions, septic systems and subdivision roadways/utilities/drainage systems within 100 feet of the 
above resource areas or 200 feet of a perennial stream. Work within bordering land subject to 
flooding (floodplain) is also subject to the jurisdiction of the Conservation Commission. Each filing 
involves one or, in some cases, multiple public hearings before the Commission. The Commission 
seeks to work through the permitting process with the applicant to provide protection of the public 
and private water supply as well as groundwater supply, provide flood control, prevent storm 
damage and pollution and protect wildlife habitats. Residents are encouraged to attend and provide 
comment relative to work near wetland resource areas. The hearings are generally held on the first 
and third Wednesday of each month. The agenda for hearings can be accessed at 
www.town.wilmington.ma. us/old/conserve. htm. 

When the Wilmington Conservation Commission was originally formed in 1964, its purpose was to 
inventory, promote, develop and conserve the town's natural resources. Today, the primary 
responsibility of the Conservation Commission is the administration and enforcement of the 
Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act (310 CMR) leaving little time to actually acquire and 
manage open space. The Conservation Commission oversees a management plan for the Town 
Forest. Implementing effective forest management strategies are the Commission's goals. The 
significant size of the parcel (154 acres) and the fact that most of it is a scenic forested upland make 
it a very promising site for passive recreational activities such as hiking, horseback riding, 
picnicking, bicycling, cross-country skiing, birding and photography. With the access road and 
parking area, the forest is accessible to residents. 

Conservation Commissioners are appointed to three-year terms by the Town Manager. Citizens 
serving on the Commission in 2012 were: Chairman Donald Pearson; Vice Chairman Vincent 
Licciardi; members Frank Ingram, Charles Fiore, Jr., Lisa Johnson, Sharon Kelley-Parella and Julia 
Flynn. Any questions about wetlands, laws and regulations or filing procedures should be directed 
to Winifred McGowan, Assistant Director of Planning & Conservation. 



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Special Projects: 



Affordable Housing 

The property at 10 Burlington Avenue, formerly known as Crystal Commons and now known as 
Metro Station in Wilmington, is under construction. Rental applications for the affordable units (30 
units) will be available in January 2013. Certification of the project by the Department of Housing 
and Community Development will enable the Town to again achieve 10% affordability. Certification 
is expected to be issued in January or February. 

Open Space and Recreation Plan Update 

The Town's Open Space and Recreation Plan is mandated to be updated every five years and the 
Open Space and Recreation Plan Committee was re-established in 2006 for that purpose. 

1-93 Interchange Planning 

The Town Manager, a representative of the Board of Selectmen, the Chairman of the Planning Board 
and the Planning Director serve on the 1-93 Task Force. Similar representatives from Andover and 
Tewksbury make up the remainder of the Task Force. A Memorandum of Understanding sets a 
framework of cooperation among the communities. All meetings of the Task Force are open to the 
public and posted in the respective communities. 

During the year, the project has been on hold pending identification of a funding source. 

Statistical Data 

Filing Fees Collected 
Notices of Intent Filed 

Requests for Determinations of Applicability 
Abbreviated Notice of Resource Area Delineation Issued/Pending 
Public Hearings/Meetings Held (including continuances) 
Extension Permits Issued/Denied 
Enforcement Orders Issued 
Violation Notices Issued 
Certificates of Compliance Issued/Denied 
Decisions Appealed/Withdrawn 
Order of Conditions Issued/Denied/Pending 
Emergency Certifications Issued 
Request for Insignificant Change Approved/Denied 
Negative Determination/Pending 
Positive Determination/W ithdrawn/Pending 
Request for Amendments/Issued/Denied/Pending 
Acres of Land Acquired 




The North Suburban Planning Council (NSPC) is composed of eight towns and one city that have 
formed a voluntary association to facilitate cooperative regional planning. The goals of NSPC are to 
facilitate communication between member communities on planning topics of interest including 
issues of growth management and land use and to provide a forum for members to create a shared 
agenda for action that, if thoughtfully addressed, will allow the region to continue to thrive as a 
desirable place to live and work. 

NSPC held nine meetings in 2012. Tony Fields, Town of Burlington, served as Chairman of the 
subregion until October 2012. Jennifer Erickson, MAPC Regional Planner, served in the role of 
NSPC Subregional Coordinator. NSPC members heard from guest presenters as well as MAPC staff 
about various projects and topics of interest. Members received information about project funding 
and technical assistance opportunities through the District Local Technical Assistance Program and 
the Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization (Boston MPO). Presentations were also 



$8,015.00 
27 
19 
2/0 
96 
3/0 
9 
67 
44/0 
2/0 
23/0/5 
7 
9/0 
19/0 
0/0/0 
2/2/0/0 
7.32 



-114- 



offered on timely topics like shared services and regional collaboration, open space and trails in the 
Middlesex and Essex counties, housing needs in the subregion, briefings on the Regional Housing 
Plan and Regional Fair Housing and Equity Assessment, a skills training on how to create maps 
with MAPC's MetroBoston DataCommon and a forum on clean/sustainable energy initiatives in the 
subregion. Two forums were cosponsored by a neighboring subregion, the North Shore Task Force. 
Members also continued the annual activity of reviewing NSPC transportation priorities, projects 
and study areas as part of the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) and the Unified Work 
Planning Program (UPWP). 

NSPC and its member communities also engaged in the following notable activities in 2012: 

• The subregion began to undertake the NSPC Priority Mapping Project, a subregional project 
to map local and subregional priority development and preservation areas and the 
infrastructure investments needed to support those priorities. This project was funded 
through three sources: the 2012 District Local Technical Assistance Program, the Unified 
Planning Work Program and funding allocated to subregions through the Metro Boston 
Sustainable Communities Consortium. The project began in April 2012 and has secured the 
active participation of eight out of nine member municipalities. Through local meetings with 
municipal staff and briefings to local boards, towns are identifying local and subregional 
priority development and preservation areas. The project will continue through to June 2013 
and will culminate in a final report and maps of local and subregional priorities. 

• The subregion submitted a comment letter to the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) 
in support of subregion projects on the TIP priority projects list and outlining study ideas for 
funding through the UPWP. 

MAPC continues to upgrade the NSPC webpage in an on-going effort to provide member 
communities with better access to information. The page can be accessed at 
http://www.mapc.org/nspc. 



The Middlesex Canal Commission (MCC) is a State Commission consisting of two members from 
each of the nine towns (Lowell, Chelmsford, Billerica, Wilmington, Woburn, Winchester, Medford, 
Charlestown and Boston) through which the Canal traversed. In addition, Representatives of the 
MassDOT, Conservation Department, State Officials, Representative James R. Miceli and Senator 
Bruce E. Tarr make up the full commission. Thomas Raphael from the Town of Winchester serves as 



Funding for the "Mill Pond Heritage Park" has been delayed. Funds have been allocated but work is 
now scheduled to begin on the project in 2016. This is disappointing. 

The highlight of the year was our receiving a Cummings Grant for $100,000. Plans are underway for 
several projects involving towpath clearing and tree removal. 

The Middlesex Canal Association consists of a few hundred members who pay dues and participate 
in our programs. 

These programs consist of the following: 

• Our website (middlesexcanal.org): Robert Winters is constantly updating our website and 
calendar telling of the current activities. This gives the reader multiple opportunities to 
participate. 

• Canal Walks: We have organized spring and fall walks for those who want a first hand 
knowledge of the canal. Last year both were held in Billerica. One walk headed south and 
the other north. The spring walk of 2013 will be held in the Town of Wilmington. They are 
always well attended. 




Chairman. 



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• Lectures: Three special events were scheduled for the winter, spring and fall. For the winter 
meeting, Guy Fitzsimmons talked about two major businesses built along the Concord River 
in Lowell, the Lowell Bleachery where wool and cotton woven in the mills were whitened, 
and the Wamesit Power Company. Both ceased operation by 1930. Last spring we invited 
Nancy Shultz to speak about her book "Fire and Roses" which tells of the Ursuline Convent 
in Charlestown, when it became the target of a violent anti-Catholic riot in 1834 and was 
burned to the ground. The convent stood high above the canal in Charlestown and the canal 
was used for supplies and travel. In the fall we had a special 50th Birthday Celebration of 
the MCA. A bus was hired to carry people along highlighted areas of the canal, lunch in the 
Baldwin Mansion and birthday cake at the canal museum. 

• Towpath Topics: Bill Gerber organizes three editions each year of our publication. There is 
always an event calendar and an article or two which answers a question or researched a 
situation which adds to our knowledge. It is well worth reading. Our website now lists all 
past editions. 

• Museum and Visitor Center: Located in North Billerica, it is open every weekend (not major 
holidays) from noon to 4 p.m. and is free to the public. Hundreds of people come by to see our 
exhibits. Staffed by volunteers, it holds the pride of place of our association. The site is the 
high point of the entire canal and the Concord River and dam provided most of the water for 
the entire canal. 

• Archeology month: Every fall we have a special event at the Museum. This year we 
highlighted our new exhibit, the Chaisson. This is a beautiful miniature exhibit of a dry 
dock which was designed by Loammi Baldwin, Jr., loaned to us by the Baldwin family. Prior 
to this construction in both Charlestown, MA and Norfolk, VA, boats had to be beached and 
rolled on their side at low tide for repair. The dry dock allowed ships to be steered into a 
rectangular box, then close off the rear, draw off the water and hence allow a dry field for 
repair. 

• Education: Woburn Street School Teacher Traci Jansen brings her entire school to the 
Museum over a week's duration. They have well planned events at 9/10 spots around the 
exhibit area. Parents come and it is always a lively event much liked by all. Randomly 
spaced teaching arrangements occur throughout the year. 

• Outreach: This year Neil Devins and Russ Silva attended the Wilmington Memorial 
Library's Annual Community Fair. They arranged a display and provided a basket of books 
and articles we sell at our Museum to be auctioned. Traci Jansen arranged a basket to be 
auctioned off at a Woburn Street School function. 

• Bicycle Tours: Conducted each fall and lead by Dick Bauer of the Somerville Historic 
Preservation Commission, a well attended group of bicyclists travel along sections of the 
canal. 

In May and June Michael Mclnnis, Russ Silva and Betty Bigwood attended several meetings when 
the Roy Family of Butters Row wanted to construct a double garage. There was an adjacent small 
building on canal property, illegally, which we wanted removed. The family agreed to do so. 

Fifty years ago an engineer, Harry J. Lasher, was asked to speak to the Billerica Historical Society. 
He had drawn a map of the Middlesex Canal. At the meeting he strongly challenged the Society to 
preserve the canal. They formed a group and under the guidance of Lou Eno, a Lowell attorney, the 
association was born. We visited Lou this year and an article about this is on our website. 

The MCA has been offered a brick building in much need of roof repair across from the current 
Museum. We have agreed to accept it and will be fund raising as soon as the legal work is 
completed. 

We always welcome new members. 

Wilmington Middlesex Canal Commission members are: Betty M. Bigwood, Neil P. Devins and 
Michael J. Mclnnis 



-116- 



Inspector of Buildin 



The office of the Inspector of Buildings is responsible for enforcing the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts building, plumbing, gas and wiring codes, the Town of Wilmington Zoning By-law and 
for maintaining all related records. In addition, all administrative tasks for the Board of Appeals are 
handled by this office. 

The Inspector of Buildings is Al Spaulding; the Plumbing and Gas Inspector is Paul Raffi; the Wiring 
Inspector is Frederick Sutter. Toni La Rivee serves as the secretary for the Building Inspector's office 
and the Board of Appeals. 

It is our responsibility to help people understand the Building Code and the Town's Zoning By-law 
enforced by the Inspector of Buildings, how best to comply with those regulations and to provide 
assistance to those who have questions about homes and property in the town. If you have any 
questions, please do not hesitate to call or come and see us. 







2010 




2011 




2012 


RESIDENTIAL 


No. 


Valuation 


No. 


Valuation 


No. 


Valuation 


Single Family Dwellings 


39 


6,697,120 


35 


5,533,516 


30 


4,278,580 


Additions 


65 


2,471,341 


69 


2,485,488 


70 


2,876,843 


Remodeling 


251 


2,561,759 


247 


2,649,475 


247 


3,004,526 


Utility Buildings 


9 


114,964 


8 


193,075 


Q 




Pools 


24 


233,670 


14 


157,045 


Zl 




Miscellaneous 


45 


232.982 


40 


582.835 


Do 






433 


12,311,836 


413 


11,601,434 


A QK 

4o0 


inQ/IK A AC 

1U, 045, 44b 


COMMERCIAL 














New Buildings 


5 


2,706,365 


3 


1,020,000 


3 


12,564,514 


Public Buildings 




















Additions 


3 


1,943,996 


2 


25,960 








Fitups 


36 


15,781,826 


47 


12,488,296 


54 


6,490,153 


Utility Buildings 








1 


4,800 


2 


85,000 


Signs 


24 


98,725 


17 


594,646 


13 


57,135 


Miscellaneous 


17 


700,787 


26 


1.300,830 


27 


3,630,294 




85 


21,231,699 


96 


15,434,532 


99 


22,827,096 


TOTAL 


518 


33,543,535 


509 


27,035,966 


534 


33,672,542 


REPORT OF FEES RECEIVED AND SUBMITTED TO TREASURER 






Building Permits 


519 


287,544.07 


509 


299,056.00 


535 


369,950.00 


Wiring Permits 


513 


55,705.00 


539 


77,027.00 


561 


76,934.00 


Gas Permits 


265 


15,219.00 


280 


19,240.00 


251 


21,940.00 


Plumbing Permits 


328 


25,485.00 


331 


33,265.00 


283 


28,914.00 


Sheet Metal 








19 


5,880.00 


31 


10,520.00 


Cert, of Inspection 


30 


1,494.00 


24 


1,065.00 


29 


1,419.00 


Occupancy 


70 


3,500.00 


76 


3,750.00 


68 


3,400.00 


Copies 




80.75 




378.25 




27.00 


Court 




















Industrial Elec. Permits 


58 


9,750.00 


46 


6,900.00 


55 


8,700.00 


Board of Appeals Fees 


24 


2.400.00 


26 


3.100.00 


22 


2.300.00 




1,807 


$401,177.82 


1,850 


$449,661.25 


1,835 


$524,104.00 



-117- 



Board of Appeals 



Case 1-12 579 Main St. Donut Shop Map 41 Parcel 138 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §3.5.4 Limited Service Restaurant for property located 
on 579 Main Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the Zoning By-law. 



Case 2-12 Stephen Palumbo Map 74 Parcel 3A 

To acquire a Variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) §5.2.4 for a roof over an entry 
to be 33.9 feet from the front lot line when 40 feet is required for property located on 18 Kilmarnock 
Street. 

Granted - no closer than 33.9 feet from the front lot line. 



Case 3-12 Lee Scalese Map 92 Parcel 28 

To acquire a Variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) §5.2.4 for a front porch to be 
23.8 feet from the front yard lot line when 30 feet is required for property located on 27 Marcus Road. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 4-12 Cross Roads Cont., for Robert Crosby Map 41 Parcel 37 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to increase a nonconforming structure (to 
construct a 2' x 7' addition 9.6 feet from the side yard lot line) for property located on 38 Columbia 
Street. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than existing nonconforming structure. 



Case 5-12 Wanda & Thomas McLaren Map 42 Parcel 40 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to increase a nonconforming structure (to 
construct a two-story 20' x 26 accessory apartment addition) for property located at 71 Clark Street. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than existing nonconforming structure. 



Case 6-12 William J. Schultz Map 19 Parcel 53 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to increase a nonconforming structure (to 
construct a two-story garage addition no closer than the existing dwelling from the front yard lot line) 
for property located at 44 Boutwell Street. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than existing nonconforming structure. 



-118- 



Case 7-12 



Keith & Karen Keating 



Map 55 Parcel 21 



To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to increase a nonconforming structure (to 
remove and reconstruct a second floor addition and move the front entrance to the side) for property 
located at 8 Williams Avenue. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than existing nonconforming structure. 

Case 8-12 Izzy's Coffee Shops LLC Map 42 Parcel 24 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §3.5.4 Limited Service Restaurant for property located 
at 335-337 Main Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the Zoning By-law. 

Case 9-12 335-337 Main Street Wilm. LLC Map 42 Parcel 24 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.4.3 Relief from Parking for property located at 335- 
337 Main Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the Zoning By-law. 

Case 10-12 Diane & Ronald Silva Map 22 Parcel 3C 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.6.7.7 Ground Water Protection District for property 
located at 5 Lt. Buck Drive. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the Zoning By-law. 

Case 11-12 Susan & John Roy Map 28 Parcel 5A 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.6.7.7 Ground Water Protection District for property 
located at 49 Butters Row. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the Zoning By-law. 

Case 12-12 Paul S. MacGilvray Map 86 Parcel 32 

To acquire a Variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) §5.2.4 for an above-ground 
pool to be 20 feet from the front yard lot line when 40 feet is allowed for property located on 2 Allgrove 
Lane. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 

Case 13-12 Target Corporation Map R2 Parcel 21 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.6.7.7 Ground Water Protection District for property 
located at 210 Ballardvale Street. 

Pending 



-119- 



Case 14-12 



Target Corporation 



Map R2 Parcel 21 



To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §3.5.1.2 Retail Store greater than 30,000 square feet for 
property located on 210 Ballardvale Street. 

Pending 



Case 15-12 4 th of July Committee Map 63 Parcel 10 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §4.1.9 for a carnival during the Fun on the Fourth 
Celebration for property located on 159 Church Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the Zoning By-law. 



Case 16-12 Michael Welch Map 48 Parcel 19A 

To acquire a Variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) §5.2.4 for an addition to be 
24.9 feet from the front yard lot hne when 40 feet is required for property located on 15 Morse Avenue. 

Pending 



Case 17-12 Steve O'Dea Map 7 Parcel 19A 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.6.7.7 Ground Water Protection District for property 
located on 3 Winston Avenue. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the Zoning By-law. 



Case 18-12 Lee Scalese Map 92 Parcel 28 

To acquire a Variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) §5.2.5 for an above-ground 
pool 12.6 feet from the side yard lot line when 15 feet is required for property located on 22 Marcus 
Road. 

Granted - no closer than 12.6 feet from the front lot line for the life of the existing pool. 



Case 19-12 John Carroll Map 7 Parcel 102 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to increase a nonconforming structure (to 
demolish an existing nonconforming dwelling and construct a new dwelling) for property located at 73 
Forest Street. 

Granted - as amended on the new plot plan dated 9-24-12 and the elevation drawing as 
submitted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than existing nonconforming 
structure. 



-120- 



Case 20-12 



John Carroll 



Map 7 Parcel 102 



To acquire a Variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) §5.2.5 to construct a new 
dwelling 10 feet from the side yard lot line when 20 feet is required for property located on 73 Forest 
Street 

Withdrawn - without prejudice 



Case 21-12 James Gillis c/o R. Peterson Esq. Map 59 Parcel 15 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.6.7.7 Ground Water Protection District for property 
located at 514 Woburn Street. 

Pending 



Case 22-12 Gary Gottschalk c/o R. Peterson Esq. Map 65 Parcel 13 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to increase a nonconforming structure (to 
demolish an existing nonconforming dwelling and construct a single family dwelling 14.4 feet from the 
side lot line when 20 feet is required) for property located on 251A Middlesex Avenue. 

Pending 



Case 23-12 Joseph Magliozzi c/o M. Welch Map 35 Parcel 15 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to increase a nonconforming structure (to 
demolish an existing nonconforming dwelling and construct a single family dwelling 10.1 and 10 feet 
from the side lot lines when 15 feet is required) for property located on 15 South Street. 

Pending 




During the year the following notices and warrants were posted by the Constable in each of the six 
(6) precincts. 

Presidential Primary February 13, 2012 

Annual Town Election and Meeting April 2, 2012 

State Primary August 7, 2012 

State Election October 24, 2012 



-121- 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY - MARCH 6, 2012 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: THE CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in Elections at the Boutwell School- Precincts 1 
and 2; Wildwood School- Precincts 3 and 4;and Town Hall- 121 Glen Road Precincts 5 and 6 on 
Tuesday, March 6, 2012 from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the Presidential Primary for the candidates of the political parties for the 
following officers: 



Presidential Preference 




For the Commonwealth 




State Committee Man 




1 st Essex & Middlesex 




State Committee Woman 




1 st Essex & Middlesex 




Town Committee 




Town of Wilmington 




Democratic Partv 




Republican Partv 




Presidential Preference 








Barack Obama 


356 


Ron Paul 


151 


No Preference 


101 


Mitt Romney 


1,658 


All Others 


17 


Rick Perry 


3 


Blanks 


23 


Rick Santorum 


232 


Total 


497 


Jon Huntsman 


4 






Michele Bachmann 


2 






Newt Gingrich 


79 






No preference 


10 






All Others 


3 






Blanks 









Total 


2,139 


State Committee Man 




State Committee Man 




Daniel J. Lauzon 


350 


Lucas Jon Noble 


1,197 


All Others 


5 


All Others 


10 


Blanks 


142 


Blanks 


932 


Total 


497 


Total 


2,139 


State Committee Woman 




State Committee Woman 




Kathleen A. Pasquina 


358 


Christina A. Bain 


432 


All Others 


3 


Kimberly A. Incampo 


1,191 


Blanks 


136 


All Others 


5 


Total 


497 


Blanks 


511 






Total 


2,139 



-122- 



Green-Rainbow Party 



Presidential Preference 



Kent Me splay 1 

Jill Stein 

Marley Mikkelson 

No Preference 1 

All Others 

Blanks 

No Preference 1 

All Others 

Total 2 



TOWN COMMITTEES 



State Committee Man 



No Nominations 

All Others 2 

Blanks 

Total 2 

State Committee Woman 
No Nominations 

All Others 

Blanks 2 

Total 2 



Democratic Town Committee 



The following people were elected to the Democratic Town Committee on March 6, 2012: 



Lorraine A. Casey 257 

Gary B. DePalma 246 

Jay J. Donovan 228 

Americo M. Enos 233 

Robert L. Hayes 231 

Alice M. Hooper 243 

George W. Hooper 254 

Dwight F. Maxwell 225 

James R. Miceli 386 

Dawn J. Reidy 226 

Nancy Steen 262 

Christine Warren 244 



Republican Town Committee 



The following people were elected to the Republican Town Committee on March 6, 2012. 



Daniel H. Ballou 958 

Robert C. DiPasquale 997 

George Lingenfelter, III 821 

Philip W. Mallard 787 

Mario S. Marchese 982 

Maria Sellitto 801 

Diane K. Trombly 897 

James J. Trombly 789 

Judith A. Waterhouse 902 



The polls were opened at 7:00 a.m. by the Town Clerk, Sharon A. George at Town Hall, (Precincts 5 
& 6) Linda Golden, Asst. Town Clerk, at the Boutwell School (Precincts 1 & 2) and Alice Hooper, 
Board of Registrars, at the Wildwood School (Precincts 3 & 4) and the polls were closed at 8:00 p.m. 
The total number of voters who cast a ballot was 2,639 which represented 18% of our 14,631 
registered voters. 



-123- 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION - APRIL 28, 2012 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 

TO: Constable of the Town of Wilmington 

ARTICLE 1. To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the following named offices to wit: 
One Selectman for the term of three years; one Moderator for the term of three years, two members 
of the School Committee for the term of three years; one member of the Housing Authority for the 
term of five years and one member of the Redevelopment Authority for the term of five years. 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the 
Town of Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections and town affairs therein to assemble 
subsequently and meet in the Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, 159 Church Street, in 
said Town of Wilmington, on Saturday the fifth of May, A.D. 2012 at 10:30 a.m., then and there to 
act on the following articles: 

In accordance with the above Warrant, the election was opened by Town Clerk Sharon A. George at 
the Town Hall, Registrar Priscilla Ward at the Boutwell School and Registrar Alice Hooper at the 
Wildwood School. 

All voting equipment was in place in each precinct. The checkers were prepared with their voting 
lists and everything was in readiness at 8:00 a.m. and the polls were declared open. 

The results were as follows: 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN for three years (vote for one) Voted 

Michael L. Champoux 1,476 

Kevin F. MacDonald 370 

Write-in 4 

Blanks 34 

Total 1,884 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE for three years (vote for two) 

Mario S. Marchese 846 

Mary Jane Byrnes 961 

Manny L. Mulas 1,028 

Write-in 5 

Blanks 928 

Total 3,768 

MODERATOR for three years (vote for one) 

James C. Stewart 1,597 

Write-in 11 

Blanks 276 

Total 1,884 

HOUSING AUTHORITY for five years (vote for one) 

Stacie A. Murphy 1,366 

Write-in 14 

Blanks 504 

Total 1,884 

REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE for three years (vote for one) 

James M. Gillis 1,449 

Write-in 5 

Blanks 430 

Total 1,884 



-124- 



REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY for five years (vote for one) 

Darryl M. MacDonald 966 

Write-in 63 

Blanks 855 

Total 1,884 



The results of this election were ready at 8:30 p.m. and the elected officers present were sworn in to 
the faithful performance of their duties by the Town Clerk, Sharon A. George. The total number of 
votes cast was 1,884 which represented 12.9% of Wilmington's 14,675 registered voters. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 5, 2012 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 

With a quorum present at 10:55 a.m. (150 by the Town of Wilmington By-Laws) James Stewart, 
Town Moderator, opened the meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance. The colors were presented by 
the Wilmington Minutemen. The Moderator then read the names of departed town workers, 
members of committees and boards that had passed away during the previous year. Those present 
paused in tribute to our servicemen and women and the hope that they will all return safely home. 
A moment of silence was observed for all. He then introduced our newly elected and re-elected town 
officials. 



MOTION: On motion of Chairman Louis Cimaglia and duly seconded, the Town of 
Wilmington voted UNANIMOUSLY that the Moderator suspend the reading of the Warrant 
and take up and make reference to each article by number. 

ARTICLE 2. To hear reports of Committees and act thereon. 

MOTION: On motion of Michael Caira, Town Manager and duly seconded, the Town of 
Wilmington voted UNANIMOUSLY that no action be taken. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of 
previous years; or take any other action related thereto. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Caira and duly seconded, it was voted UNANIMOUSLY by the 
Town of Wilmington not to adopt Article 3. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the town will vote to authorize the Treasurer/Collector, with the approval of 
the Selectmen, to enter into an agreement, under the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 53F of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, with one or more banks doing business in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, during Fiscal Year 2013 and for a term not to exceed three years, which will permit 
the Town of Wilmington to maintain funds on deposit with such institutions in return for said 
institutions providing banking services; or take any other action related thereto. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Cimaglia and duly seconded, it was voted UNANIMOUSLY by 
the Town of Wilmington to authorize the Treasurer/Collector, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, to enter into an agreement, under the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 53F of 
the Massachusetts General Laws, with one or more banks doing business in the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, during Fiscal Year 2013 and for a term not to exceed three 
years, which will permit the Town of Wilmington to maintain funds on deposit with such 
institutions in return for said institutions providing banking services. 



-125- 



ARTICLE 5. To see how much money the town will appropriate for the expenses of the town and the 
salaries of several Town Officers and Departments and determine how the same shall be raised, 
whether by taxation, transfer from available funds, or otherwise; or take any other action related 
thereto. 

Discussion began regarding the way each department budget was voted. A vote was put to the body 
as to taking each category; such as General Government, Public Safety, rather than each department 
within the category. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. John Doherty, Chairman of the Finance Committee, and duly 
seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in the affirmative that the several and respective 
sums as recommended and presented by the Finance Committee be raised from the FY- 13 
tax levy and other general revenues of the Town, or by transfer from available funds as may 
be recommended by the Finance Committee, and be appropriated for the purpose set forth in 
Article 5, each budget category including General Government; Public Safety; Public Works; 
Community Development; Public Buildings; Human Services; Wilmington School 
Department; Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School District; 
Maturing Debt and Interest; Unclassified & Reserve and Statutory Charges to be taken up 
and voted on in the order they appear, subject to amendment, and each budget category not 
be open for reconsideration until the entire budget is voted. 

The Moderator recognized Finance Committee Chairman, John Doherty, for comments. Mr. Doherty 
stated that the Finance Committee has four motions that will be voted on during the budget votes. 
Each motion will be voted during the part of the budget it refers to. 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Selectmen - Legislative 

Salaries 4,620 

Expenses 14,800 

Furnishings & Equipment 

TOTAL 19,420 

Selectmen - Elections 

Salaries 26,530 

Expenses 9,415 

Total 35,945 



Registrars of Voters 

Salaries 1,875 

Expenses 7.000 

Total 8,875 

Finance Committee 

Salaries 1,400 

Expenses 8,500 

Total 9,900 



Town Manager 

Salary - Town Manager 140,000 

Other Salaries 299,872 

Expenses 70,300 

Furnishings & Equipment Q 

Total 510,172 



-126- 



Town Accountant 

Salary -Town Accountant 106,349 

Other Salaries 236,460 

Expenses 2,560 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 345,369 

Treasurer/Collector 

Salary - Treasurer/Collector 89,827 

Other Salaries 144,898 

Expenses 19,807 

Amt. Cert. Tax Title 15,000 

Furnishings & Equipment 305 

Total 269,837 

Town Clerk 

Salary - Town Clerk 75,613 

Other Salaries 88,958 

Expenses 3,575 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 168,146 

Board of Assessors 

Salary - Principal Assessor 103,575 

Other Salaries 93,999 

Expenses 69,400 

Appraisals & Inventory 64,900 

ATB Costs 20,000 

Furnishings & Equipment 1,500 

Total 353,374 

Town Counsel 

Legal Services 221,000 

Expenses 7,500 

Total 228,500 

Permanent Building Committee 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Total 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 1.949.538 

PUBLIC SAFETY 
Police 

Salary - Chief 112,609 

Salary - Deputy Chief 98,470 

Salary - Lieutenants 308,444 

Salary - Sergeants 405,797 

Salary - Patrolmen 2,007, 154 

Salary - Clerks 87,387 

Salary - Overtime 475,000 

Salary - Paid Holidays 85,000 

Salary - Specialists 12,450 

Salary - Night Differential 45,864 

Salary - Incentive 400,459 

-127- 



Sick Leave Buyback 26,700 

Expenses 251,830 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 4,317,164 

Fire 

Salary -Chief 114,856 

Salary - Deputy Chief 80,380 

Salary - Lieutenants 443,501 

Salary - Privates 1,918,478 

Salary - Clerk 52,470 

Salary - Part Time 18,655 

Salary - Overtime 500,000 

Salary - Paid Holidays 134,900 

Salary - EMT & Incentive Pay 9,625 

Salary - Fire Alarms 

Salary - Sick Leave Buyback 25,425 

Expenses 134,450 

Furnishing & Equipment 

Total 3,432,740 

Public Safety Central Dispatch 

Personnel Services 551,161 

Contractual Services 28,000 

Material & Supplies 3,750 

Furnishings & Equipment 6,000 

Total 588,911 

Animal Control 

Salaries 39,335 

Expenses 3,825 

Total 43,160 

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 8.381.975 

PUBLIC WORKS 
Personnel Services 

Superintendent 106,616 

Engineer - Full Time 231,383 

Engineer - Part Time 12,220 

Highway - Full Time 1, 155,247 

Highway - Overtime 60,990 

Highway - Seasonal 13,600 

Stream Maintenance - Seasonal 13,600 

Tree - Full Time 186,333 

Tree - Overtime 8,800 

Parks/Grounds - Full Time 334,382 

Parks/Grounds - Overtime 18,830 

Cemetery - Full Time 135,113 

Cemetery - Part Time 6,760 

Cemetery - Overtime 10,360 

Snow/Ice - Extra Help - Overtime 168.350 

Total 2,462,584 



-128- 



Contractual Services 



Engineer 


7,700 


Engineer - Training/Conference 


2,000 


Highway 


86,090 


Highway - Repairs/Town Vehicles 


120,900 


Highway - Training/Conference 


2,000 


Tree 


7,000 


Parks/Grounds 


19,000 


Cemetery 


4,100 


Road Machinery - Repair 


80,000 


Piinlip Sltvppt T,icn1"Q 

J. LI U J.1L, V.J 11 C" I LJLCfLL lo 


ook a An 




1 C1Q (111 

i,biy,ui i 


Snow & Tr*P Rpnairc; 


1 Q TQA 

lo, 1 oU 


Snnw <\r Tr*p — IVTi^pplljinprniQ ftpv\7ir*pc 

U11UW \X» J-I^C IVlioLCllaUCuUio kJCl VlLCo 


i cn Ann 


Total 

l w tell 


O QR1 KOI 


terials & Supplies 




Engineer 


4,800 


Highway 


39,000 


Highway - Construction Supplies & Road Improvements 


82,000 


Highway - Gas, Oil, Tires (Other) 


222,830 


Highway - Gas, Oil, Tires (DPW) 


145,918 


Stream Maintenance - Expenses 


1,000 


Tree 


6,500 


Parks/Grounds 


92,350 


Cemetery 


13,650 


Drainage Projects 


65,000 


Snow & Ice - Salt & Sand 


194,460 


Snow & Ice - Tools & Equipment 


6.000 


Total 


873,508 



Furnishings & Equipment 41,900 
Sewer 

Personnel Services 71,540 

Maintenance/Operations 62.340 

Total 133,880 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 5.863.403 

5A 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Doherty and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in the 
affirmative that the sum of Five Million Eight Hundred Sixty-Three Thousand Four 
Hundred Three Dollars ($5.863.403) be appropriated for the Department of Public Works; 
and to meet this appropriation Twenty Thousand Dollars ($20,000) be transferred from the 
Sale of Cemetery Lots Account and the sum of Twenty Thousand Dollars ($20,000) be 
transferred from Interest Cemetery Trust Funds and that both amounts be applied to the 
line item Personnel Services Cemetery - Full Time and that the balance of Five Million 
Eight Hundred Twenty-Three Thousand Four Hundred Three Dollars ($5.823.403) be raised 
from the FY-13 tax levy and other general revenues of the Town. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

Board of Health 

Salary - Director 78,361 

Other Salaries 114,620 

Expenses 9,575 

Mental Health 35,000 

Furnishings & Equipment Q 

Total 237,556 



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Sealer of Weights/Measures 

Salaries 

Expenses 5,000 

Total 5,000 

Planning & Conservation 

Salary - Director 81,664 

Other Salaries 209,999 

Expenses 10,175 

Furnishings & Equipment 1,950 

Total 303,788 

Building Inspector/Board of Appeals 

Salary - Building Inspector 73,962 

Other Salaries 106,901 

Expenses 4.250 

Furnishings/Equipment Q 

Total 185,113 

TOTAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 731.457 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

Salary - Superintendent 95,849 

Other Salaries 2,372,142 

Overtime 50,000 

Part Time Seasonal 13,600 

Heating 1,294,000 

Electricity 200,000 

Utilities 110,000 

Expenses 545,400 

Furnishings & Equipment Q 

TOTAL PUBLIC BUILDINGS 4.680.991 
HUMAN SERVICES 

Veterans' Aid/Benefits 

Salary - Veterans' Agent 60,024 

Other Salaries Part Time 9,360 

Expenses 1.950 

Assistance - Veterans 310,000 

Total 381,334 

Library 

Salary - Director 84,423 

Other Salaries 727,535 

Merrimack Valley Library Consortium 34,344 

Expenses 155,049 

Furnishings & Equipment 15,150 

Total 1,016,501 

Recreation 

Salary - Director 71,243 

Other Salaries 47,337 

Expenses 4,700 

Furnishings & Equipment 20Q 

Total 123,980 



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Elderly Services 

Salary - Director 67, 185 

Other Salaries 123,387 

Expenses 40,970 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 231,542 

Historical Commission 

Salaries 21,542 

Expenses 6,750 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 28,292 

TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES 1.781.649 

SCHOOLS 

Wilmington School Department 32,569,830 
Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational 

Technical High School District 3,562,275 

TOTAL SCHOOLS 36.132.105 

MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 

Schools 3,280,085 

Public Safety 131,950 

General Government 

Sewer 152,690 

Water 133,120 
Interest on Anticipation of Notes & 

Authorization Fees & Miscellaneous Debt 20,000 

TOTAL MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 3.717.845 



5B 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Doherty and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that the sum of Three Million Seven Hundred Seventeen Thousand Eight 
Hundred Forty-Five Dollars ($3.717.845) be appropriated for Maturing Debt and Interest; 
and to meet this appropriation, the sum of One Hundred Thirty-Three Thousand One 
Hundred Twenty Dollars ($133,120) be transferred from Water Department Available Funds 
and be applied to the line item Maturing Debt and Interest- Water and that the sum of Two 
Thousand Dollars ($2,000) be transferred from Water Department Available Funds and be 
applied to the line item Maturing Debt and Interest, Authorization Fees and Miscellaneous 
Debt, and that the balance of Three Million Five Hundred Eighty-Two Thousand Seven 
Hundred Twentv-Five Dollars ($3,582,725) be raised from the FY- 13 tax levy and other 
general revenues of the Town. 



UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 



Insurance 


612,660 


Employee Health & Life Insurance 


10,316,000 


Veterans' Retirement 





Employee Retirement Unused Sick Leave 


42,000 


Medicare Employer's Contribution 


575,998 


Salary Adjustments & Additional Costs 


300,000 


Local Transportation & Training Conferences 


5,000 


Out-of-State Travel 


1,500 


Computer Maintenance Expenses 


67,881 


Annual Audit 


31,000 


Ambulance Billing 


27,000 



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Town Report & Calendar 10,000 

Professional & Technical Services 110,000 

Reserve Fund 450.000 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 12.549.039 



5C 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Doherty and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that the sum of Twelve Million Five Hundred Fortv-Nine Thousand Thirty- 
Nine Dollars ($12,549,039) be appropriated for Unclassified and Reserve of which the sum of 
Eighty-Eight Thousand Two Hundred Seventy-Eight Dollars ($88,278) be transferred from 
Water Department Available Funds and be applied to the Unclassified and Reserve - 
Insurance Account; and that the sum of Three Hundred Eight Thousand Four Hundred 
Fortv-Nine Dollars ($308,449) be transferred from Water Department Available Funds and 
be applied to the Unclassified and Reserve - Employee Life and Health Insurance Account; 
and that the sum of Twenty- Four Thousand Six Hundred Twenty-Eight Dollars ($24.628) be 
transferred from Water Department Available Funds and be applied to the Unclassified and 
Reserve - Medicare Employee's Contribution Account; and that the remaining balance of 
Twelve Million One Hundred Twenty-Seven Thousand Six Hundred Eighty-Four Dollars 
($12.127.684) be raised from the FY- 13 tax levy and other general revenues of the Town. 



TOTAL MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT 39.655.897 

STATUTORY CHARGES 

Current Year Overlay 700,000 

Retirement Contributions 4,402,219 

Offset Items 19,523 

Special Education 5,953 

Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 471,680 

MAPC (Ch. 688 of 1963) 7,033 

RMV Non-Renewal Surcharge 6,260 

Metro Air Pollution Control District 7,197 

Mosquito Control Program 51,551 

M.W.R.A. Sewer Assessment 2,243,478 

School Choice 5,000 

Charter Schools 54,888 

Essex County Technical Institute 74,850 

TOTAL STATUTORY CHARGES 8.049.632 



5D 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Doherty and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that the sum of Eight Million Fortv-Nine Thousand Six Hundred Thirty-Two 
Dollars ($8,049,632) be appropriated for Statutory Charges of which the sum of Three 
Hundred Eighty-Eight Thousand Six Hundred Fifty-Nine Dollars ($388,659) be transferred 
from Water Department Available Funds and be applied to the Statutory Charges - 
Retirement Contributions Account; and that the remaining balance of Seven Million Six 
Hundred Sixty Thousand Nine Hundred Seventy-Three Dollars ($7,660.973) be raised from 
the FY-13 tax levy and other general revenues of the Town. 



TOTAL 83.837.634 
PROPOSED CAPITAL OUTLAY & WARRANT ARTICLES 2,592,510 
TOTAL PROPOSED BUDGET 86.430.144 



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ESTIMATED AVAILABLE FUNDS 
Tax Levy 
Local Receipts 
Local Receipts - Sewer 
Local Aid 
Free Cash 

Water Dept. Available Funds 
Sale of Cemetery Lots 
Cemetery Trust Fund - Interest 
Capital Stabilization Fund 
Provision for Abates Surplus 
Capital Project Closeouts 



63,116,601 
6,635,000 
2,410,558 

12,533,444 




945,134 
20,000 
20,000 
90,000 

600,000 
59,407 



TOTAL ESTIMATED FY 2013 AVAILABLE FUNDS 



86.430.144 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from any available funds, 
or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money for the purchase of new and/or 
replacement capital equipment, including but not limited to the following items, and further to 
authorize the sale, trade-in, conveyance or other disposition of any equipment being so replaced, 
such funds to be spent by the town department, so indicated, with the approval of the Town 
Manager, and to the extent set forth in Chapter 592 of the Acts of 1950, the Board of Selectmen, as 
follows: 

Police Department 

Purchase of four (4) replacement police cruisers. 

MOTION: On motion of Selectman Michael V. McCoy and duly seconded, the Town of 
Wilmington voted 190 in favor 1 opposed that One Hundred Forty-Four Thousand Dollars 
($144,000) be raised and appropriated from the FY- 13 tax levy and other general revenues of 
the town to be spent by the Town Manager for the purchase of four (4) replacement police 
cruisers for the Police Department and further, the sale, trade in or other disposition, if any, 
of said replaced vehicles is hereby authorized. 

Fire Department 

Purchase of one (1) 1250 GPM Pumper 

MOTION: On motion of Selectman Michael J. Newhouse and duly seconded, the Town of 
Wilmington voted 190 in favor and 1 opposed that Six Hundx'ed Thirty Thousand Dollars 
($630,000) be appropriated to be spent by the Town Manager for the purchase of one (1) 1250 
Gallon Per Minute Pumper for the Fire Department and to meet this appropriation the 
amount of Fifty-Nine Thousand Four Hundred Seven Dollars ($59,407) be transferred in 
accordance with the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 20 of the General Laws, from the 
unexpended balance of funds previously borrowed by the Town to pay for the costs of an 
aerial ladder truck as such funds are no longer needed for such purpose and Five Hundred 
Seventy Thousand Five Hundred Ninety-Three Dollars ($570,593) be transferred from the 
Overlay Reserve Fund. 

Department of Public Works 

Purchase of one (1) replacement vacuum street sweeper and one (1) replacement backhoe/loader; 
both items to be assigned to the Highway Division. 

MOTON: On motion of Selectman Michael L. Champoux and duly seconded, the Town of 
Wilmington voted in the affirmative that Three Hundred Fifty-Eight Thousand Dollars 
($358,000) be raised and appropriated from the FY-13 tax levy and other general revenues of 
the town to be spent by the Town Manager for the purchase of one (1) replacement vacuum 
street sweeper and one (1) replacement backhoe/loader for the Department of Public Works 
and further the sale, trade in or other disposition, if any, of said replaced vehicles is hereby 
authorized. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. 



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ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money for the purchase of new digital portable 
and mobile radios to upgrade the police communication system; or take any other action related 
thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. 

MOTION: On motion of Selectman Judith L. O'Connell and duly seconded, the Town of 
Wilmington voted in the affirmative that Sixty-Eight Thousand Four Hundred Dollars 
($68.400) be appropriated to be spent by the Town Manager for the purchase of new digital 
portable and mobile radios to upgrade the communications system for the Police Department 
and to meet this appropriation the amount of Twentv-Nine Thousand Four Hundred Seven 
Dollars ($29,407) be transferred from the Overlay Reserve Fund and that the remaining 
balance of Thirty-Eight Thousand Nine Hundred Ninety-Three Dollars ($38.993) be raised 
from the FY- 13 tax levy and other general revenues of the Town. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money for the replacement of approximately 
9,744 square feet of roof area at the West Intermediate School; 15,288 square feet of roof area at the 
Wildwood Early Childhood Center and 8,800 square feet of roof area at the Wilmington Memorial 
Library, such funds to be spent by the Public Buildings Department with the approval of the Town 
Manager; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Cimaglia, seconded by Mr. Doherty, the Town of Wilmington 
voted in the affirmative that Six Hundred Thirtv-Five Thousand Dollars ($635,000) be 
appropriated to be spent by the Town Manager for the replacement of approximately 15,288 
square feet of roof area at the Wildwood Early Childhood Center; 9,744 square feet of roof 
area at the West Intermediate School and 8,800 square feet of roof area at the Wilmington 
Memorial Library and to meet this appropriation the amount of Ninety Thousand Dollars 
($90,000) be transferred from Available Funds - Capital Stabilization Fund and that the 
remaining balance of Five Hundred Forty-Five Thousand Dollars ($545,000) be raised from 
the FY- 13 tax levy and other revenues of the Town. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate, borrow or transfer from available funds an 
amount of money to be expended under the direction of the Town Manager and the School Building 
Committee for the purpose of paying the costs to replace all single pane windows and exterior doors 
with energy efficient units throughout the North Intermediate School located at 320 Salem Street, 
Wilmington which proposed repair project would materially extend the useful life of the school and 
preserve an asset that otherwise is capable of supporting the required educational program and for 
which the Town has applied for a school construction grant under the accelerated repair grant 
program from the Massachusetts School Building Authority (MSBA). The Town acknowledges that 
the MSBA's grant program is a non-entitlement, discretionary program based on need, as 
determined by the MSBA, and if the MSBA's Board of Directors votes to invite the Town to 
collaborate with the MSBA on this proposed repair project, any project costs the Town incurs in 
excess of any grant that may be approved by and received from the MSBA shall be the sole 
responsibility of the Town. Any grant that the Town may receive from the MSBA shall be the sole 
responsibility of the Town; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. McCoy and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in the 
affirmative that the Town appropriate the amount of Eight Hundred Four Thousand Six 
Hundred Forty Dollars ($804,640) for the purpose of paying the costs to replace all single 
pane windows and exterior doors with energy efficient units throughout the North 
Intermediate School located at 320 Salem Street, Wilmington, including the payment of all 
costs incidental or related thereto, which proposed repair project would materially extend the 



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useful life of the school and preserve an asset that otherwise is capable of supporting the 
required educational program; and for which the Town may be eligible for a grant from the 
Massachusetts School Building Authority ("MSB A"), under the Accelerated Repair Program, 
said amount to be expended under the direction of the Town Manager and the School 
Building Committee. The Town acknowledges that the MSBAs grant program is a non- 
entitlement, discretionary program based on need, as determined by the MSBA, and any 
project costs the Town incurs in excess of any grant approved by and received from the 
MSBA shall be the sole responsibility of the Town; provided further that any grant that the 
Town may receive from the MSBA for the Project shall not exceed the lesser of (1) Fifty and 
Fifty-Eight Hundredths percent (50.58%) of eligible, approved project costs, as determined by 
the MSBA, or (2) the total maximum grant amount determined by the MSBA. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from any available 
funds or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money to repaint the interior of the 
Shawsheen Elementary School; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Newhouse and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that Seventy-Eight Thousand Dollars ($78.000) be raised and appropriated 
from the FY- 13 tax levy and other general revenues of the Town to be spent by the Town 
Manager to repaint the interior of the Shawsheen Elementary School. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds 
a sum of money to replace the eight existing garage doors at the Department of Public Works; or take 
any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Champoux and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that Forty-Two Thousand Dollars ($42.000) be raised and appropriated from 
the FY- 13 tax levy and other general revenues of the Town to be spent by the Town Manager 
to replace the eight existing garage doors at the Department of Public Works. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from any available 
funds or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money to undertake various 
improvements and repairs to municipal and school facilities including but not limited to addressing 
energy efficiencies, plant operations, mechanical systems, structural issues and code compliance, 
such funds to be spent by the Public Buildings Department with the approval of the Town Manager; 
or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. 

MOTION: On motion of Ms. O'Connell and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that One Hundred Twenty-Five Thousand Dollars ($125.000) be raised and 
appropriated from the FY- 13 tax levy and other general revenues of the town to be spent by 
the Town Manager to undertake various improvements and repairs to municipal and school 
facilities including but not limited to addressing energy efficiencies, plant operations, 
mechanical systems, structural issues and code compliance. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds 
a sum of money to make certain technology improvements in the Middle School including, but not 
limited to, the installation of a wireless network; or take any other action related thei'eto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of the article. 



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MOTION: On motion of School Committee member Robert L. Hayes and seconded by Mr. 
Doherty, the Town of Wilmington voted in the affirmative that Ninety Thousand Dollars 
($90,000) be raised and appropriated from the FY- 13 tax levy and other general revenues of 
the town to be spent by the Superintendent of Schools with the approval of the School 
Committee to make certain technology improvements in the Wilmington Middle School 
including, but not limited to, the installation of a wireless network. 

ARTICLE 14. To see what sum the Town will vote to transfer into various line items of the Fiscal 
Year 2012 budget from other line items of said budget and from other available funds; or take any 
other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee Took No Action on this Article pending further information. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Caira and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in the 
affirmative that Eight Hundred Fifty-Three Thousand Eight Hundred Seventy-Eight Dollars 
($853,878) be transferred from the following fiscal year 2012 accounts: 



Town Manager - Other Salaries $ 12,000 

Police Salary - Paid Holidays 20,000 

Fire Salary - Privates 35,000 

Public Safety Central Dispatch - Personnel Services 30,000 

Public Works, Personnel Services - Tree, Full Time 20,000 

Public Works, Personnel Services - Snow & Ice, Extra Help/Overtime 79,000 

Public Works, Contractual Services - Snow & Ice, Miscellaneous Services 95,000 

Public Works, Contractual Services - Snow & Ice, Salt and Sand 70,000 

Public Works, Contractual Services - Public Street Lights 75,000 

Public Works, Contractual Services - Rubbish Collection & Disposal 100,000 

Planning and Conservation - Other Salaries 18,000 

Elderly Services - Other Salaries 7,000 

Schools - Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical H. S. District 36,905 

Unclassified and Reserve - Insurance 80,000 

Capital Outlay - Public Buildings, Library Ceiling/Lighting 29,900 

Capital Outlay - Elderly Services, Wheelchair/Transport Van 9,000 

and further to transfer the sum of $137,073 from Available Funds the entire amount being 
$853,878, to the following fiscal year 2012 accounts: 

Police, Salary - Overtime 30,000 

Fire, Salary - Overtime 150,000 

Public Works, Materials and Supplies, Highway - Gas, Oil, Tires (Other) 33,600 

Public Works, Material and Supplies, Highway - Gas, Oil, Tires (DPW) 26,400 

Unclassified & Reserve - Employee Health and Life Insurance 450,000 

Unclassified & Reserve - Salary Adjustments and Additional Costs 88,878 

Capital Outlay - Public Buildings, Misc. Facility Improvements 75,000 

Total: $ 853,878 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money for the purpose of providing senior citizen 
work opportunities for services rendered to the Town in accordance with the Town's Senior Citizen 
Tax Work-Off Program; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Cimaglia and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that Fifteen Thousand Three Hundred Sixty Dollars ($15,360) be raised and 
appropriated from the FY-13 tax levy and other general revenues of the Town to be spent by 
the Town Manager for the purpose of providing senior citizen work opportunities for services 
rendered to the Town in accordance with the Town's Senior Citizen Tax Work-Off Program. 



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ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money for the observance of Memorial Day and 
Veterans' Day; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. McCoy and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in the 
affirmative that Six Thousand Dollars ($6.000) be raised and appropriated from the FY- 13 
tax levy and other general revenues of the town to be spent by the Town Manager for the 
observance of Memorial Day and Veterans' Day. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute the sum of $750.00 for the purpose of renewing under the 
authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended, the lease of: 

Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for 
the Nee-Ellsworth Post 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States; 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Newhouse and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00) be raised and appropriated from 
the FY- 13 tax levy and other general revenues of the Town to be spent by the Town Manager 
for the purpose of renewing, under the authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General 
Laws as amended, the lease of: 

Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters 
for the Nee-Ellsworth Post 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States; 

ARTICLE 18. (drawn #31) To see if the Town will vote to authorize or reauthorize as the case may 
be, revolving accounts pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter 44, Section 53E V% for the various boards, 
commissions, departments and agencies of the Town; or take any other action related thereto 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Champoux and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that the Town vote to reauthorize the following revolving accounts pursuant 
to M. G. L. Chapter 44, Section 53 E K as follows: 

First a Compost Bin Revolving Fund with an established spending limit of $4,500, with 
the source of revenues being the sale of composting bins, the spending authority being 
the Town Manager and the purpose for which money may be spent is the purchase of 
composting bins; and second, a Subsurface Sewage Disposal Upgrade Revolving Fund 
with an established spending limit of $200,000, with the source of revenues being 
betterment receipts and other loan repayments from property owners participating in 
said program, the purpose of expenditures being the repair and upgrade of subsurface 
sewage disposal systems and the repayment to the Massachusetts Water Pollution 
Abatement Trust of any funds advanced to the town for this purpose, and the spending 
authority being the Board of Health with the approval of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 19. (drawn # 24) To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways the following 
described streets, as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen 
(Massachusetts General Laws Ch. 41 and Ch. 82 as amended) and shown on certain Definitive 
Subdivision plans approved in accordance with "Rules and Regulations Governing the Subdivision of 
Land in the Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts," which plans are recorded at the Middlesex North 
Registry of Deeds and copies of which are on file in the office of the Town Clerk; and to authorize the 



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Selectmen to acquire by purchase, gift or eminent domain such land and slope, drainage and other 
easements as may be necessary to effectuate the purpose of this Article; and further to raise and 
appropriate, transfer from available funds, or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of 
money to be spent by the Town Manager with the approval of the Board of Selectmen for such 
purposes. 

a. Fiorenza Drive - Beginning at a stone bound/drill hole on the westerly sideline of Andover Street 
N 20° 57' 25" E a distance of 64.42 feet opposite center line station 0+0 of said Fiorenza Drive; 
thence by said westerly sideline of Andover Street S 20° 57' 25" W a distance of seventy-five and 
ninety hundredths feet (75.90') to a point; thence S 74° 46' 15" W a distance of eighteen and 
seven hundredths feet (18.07') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence N 55° 11' 08" W a distance of 
one hundred sixty-eight and ninety-nine hundredths feet (168.99') to a stone bound/drill hole; 
thence by a curved line to the right having a length of three hundred and eight and eleven 
hundredths feet (308.11') and a radius of four hundred feet (400.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; 
thence Nil 03' 08" W a distance of one hundred fifty-one and fourteen hundredths feet (151.14') 
to a stone bound/drill hole; thence by a curved line to the left having a length of two hundred and 
fifty-eight and thirteen hundredths feet (258.13') and a radius of one hundred seventy feet 
(170.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence S 81° 57' 00" W a distance of four hundred feet 
(400.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence by a curved line to the right having a length of sixty- 
two and eighty-seven hundredths feet (62.87') and a radius of one hundred seventy-five feet 
(175.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence N 77° 28' 00" W a distance of two hundred twenty 
feet (220.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence by a curved line to the right having a length of 
one hundred ninety-two and forty-two hundredths feet (192.42') and a radius of one hundred 
seventy-five feet (175.00') to a stone bound/drill hole. Thence N 14° 28' 00" W a distance of two 
hundred twenty feet (220.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence by a curved line to the right 
having a length of thirty-six and sixty-five hundredths feet (36.65') and a radius of one hundred 
seventy-five feet (175.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence N 02° 28' 00" W a distance of five 
hundred twenty feet (520.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence by a curved line to the right 
having a length of two hundred ninety-one and forty-seven hundredths feet (291.47') and a 
radius of two hundred feet (200.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence N 81° 02' 16" E a distance 
of sixty-four feet (64.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence by a curved line to the right having a 
length of three hundred twenty-one and seventy-two hundredths feet (321.72') and a radius of 
two hundred feet (200.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence S 06° 48' 00" E a distance of five 
hundred and twenty-five feet (525.00') to a stone bound/drill hole opposite center line station 
36+49.70 of Fiorenza Drive at the westerly end of My Way Circle; thence by the westerly end of 
said My Way Circle in two courses as follows: by a curved line to the left having a length of sixty- 
two and seven hundredths feet (62.07') and a radius of one hundred twenty-five feet (125.00') to a 
point; and S 35° 15' 00" E a distance of sixty-four and twenty-five hundredths feet (64.25') to a 
stone bound/drill hole; thence S 35° 15' 00" E a distance of one hundred forty-five and seventy- 
five hundredths feet (145.75') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence by a curved line to the right 
having a length of eighty-five and sixty-seven hundredths feet (85.67') and a radius of one 
seventy-five feet (175.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence S 07° 12' 01" E a distance of forty- 
eight and eighteen hundredths feet (48.18') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence by a curved line to 
the left having a length of forty-seven and fifty-seven hundredths feet (47.57') and a radius of 
thirty feet (30.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence N 81° 57' 00" E a distance of one hundred 
forty-four and eighteen hundredths feet (144.18') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence by a curved 
line to the right having a length of three hundred thirty-four and five hundredths feet (334.05') 
and a radius of two hundred twenty feet (220.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence S 11° 03' 08" 
E a distance of one hundred fifty-one and fourteen hundredths feet (151.14') to a stone 
bound/drill hole; thence by a curved line to the left having a length of two hundred sixty-nine and 
sixty hundredths feet (269.60') and a radius of three hundred fifty feet (350.00') to a stone 
bound/drill hole; thence S 55° 11' 08" E a distance of one hundred thirty-three and thirty-eight 
hundredths feet (133.38') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence by a curved line to the left having a 
length of fifty-four and seventy-five hundredths feet (54.75') and a radius of thirty feet (30.00') to 
a stone bound/drill hole and the point of beginning. 



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HEREBY EXCEPTING from the above, certain parcels of land shown as Lots 42-50, Lot 51A, Lot 
52A and Lots 53-59 on the above-referenced plan, bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning as a point at the southeasterly corner of Lot 42 at a stone bound/drill hole; thence S 
81° 57' 00" W a distance of one hundred forty-five and eighty-one hundredths feet (145.81') to a 
stone bound/drill hole; thence by a curved line to the right having a length of forty-four and 
ninety-one hundredths feet (44.91') and a radius of one hundred and twenty-five feet (125.00') to 
a stone bound/drill hole; thence N 77° 28' 00" W a distance of two hundred twenty feet (220.00') 
to a stone bound/drill hole; thence by a curved line to the right having a length of one hundred 
thirty-seven and forty-four hundredths feet (137.44') and a radius of one hundred twenty-five 
feet (125.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence N 14° 28' 00" W a distance of two hundred 
twenty feet (220.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence by a curved line to the right having a 
length of twenty-six and eighteen hundredths feet (26.18') and a radius of one hundred twenty- 
five feet (125.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence N 02° 28' 00" W a distance of five hundred 
twenty feet (520.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence by a curved line to the right having a 
length of two hundred eighteen and sixty hundredths feet (218.60') and a radius of one hundred 
fifty feet (150.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence N 81° 02' 16" E a distance of sixty-four feet 
(64.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence by a curved line to the right having a length of two 
hundred forty-one and twenty-nine hundredths feet (241.29') and a radius of one fifty feet 
(150.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence S 06° 48' 00" E a distance of five hundred twenty-five 
feet (525.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence by a curved line to the left having a length of 
eighty-six and ninety hundredths feet (86.90') and a radius of one hundred seventy-five feet 
(175.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence S 35° 15' 00" E a distance of two hundred ten feet 
(210.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence by a curved line to the right having a length of sixty- 
one and twenty hundredths feet (61.20') and a radius of one hundred twenty-five feet (125.00') to 
a stone bound/drill hole; thence S 07° 12' 01" E a distance of forty-nine and eighty-one 
hundredths feet (49.81') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence by a curved line to the right having a 
length of forty-six and sixty-eight hundredths feet (46.68') and a radius of thirty feet (30.00') to a 
stone bound/drill hole and the point of beginning. 

All of the above said describes the street layout of Fiorenza Drive in the Town of Wilmington, 
and encompasses 204,943 square feet of land more or less. This parcel is shown as Fiorenza 
Drive (50' wide) on plan entitled "Street Acceptance Plan, Andover Heights I & II, Fiorenza 
Drive & My Way Circle, Wilmington, Massachusetts," sheets 1 and 2, prepared by Dana F. 
Perkins, Inc., dated December 29, 2011, scale one inch equals 40 feet. Fiorenza Drive is 
approximately 4,087 +/- feet in length. 

My Way Circle - Beginning at a point on the easterly sideline of Fiorenza Drive at a stone 
bound/drill hole opposite center line station 36+49.70 of Fiorenza Drive at the westerly end of My 
Way Circle; thence by a curved line to the left having a length of fifty-seven and sixty 
hundredths feet (57.60') and a radius of thirty feet (30.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence N 
63° 12'00" E a distance of two hundred thirty-five feet (235.00') to a point; thence by a curved line 
to the right having a length of two hundred sixty-nine and thirty hundredths (269.30') and a 
radius of sixty (60.00') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence by a curved line to the left having a 
length of forty and forty hundredths feet (40.40') and a radius of thirty feet (30.00') to a stone 
bound/drill hole; thence S 63° 12' 00" W a distance of one hundred forty-two and fifty-one 
hundredths feet (142.51') to a stone bound/drill hole; thence by a curved line to the left having a 
length of fifty-one and fifty-five hundredths feet (51.55') and a radius of thirty feet (30.00') to a 
stone bound/drill hole on the easterly sideline of said Fiorenza Drive; thence by the easterly 
sideline of said Fiorenza Drive in two courses as follows: N 35° 15' 00" W a distance of sixty-four 
and twenty-five hundredths feet (64.25') to a point; by a curved line to the right having a length 
of sixty-two and seven hundredths feet (62.07') and a radius of one hundred twenty-five feet 
(125.00') to a stone bound/drill hole and the point of beginning; 

All of the above said describes the street layout of My Way Circle in the Town of Wilmington and 
encompasses 23,248 square feet of land more or less. This parcel of land is shown as My Way 
Circle (50' wide) on a plan entitled "Street Acceptance Plan, Andover Heights I & II, Fiorenza 
Drive & My Way Circle, Wilmington, Massachusetts," sheet 2, prepared by Dana F. Perkins, 



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Inc., dated December 29, 2011, scale one inch equals 40 feet. The length of My Way Circle is 
approximately 341 feet. 

c. Jaques Lane - Commencing at a fixed point being located at the northerly sideline of Jaques 
Lane and the southeasterly corner of Lot 1, thence running N 68 ° 45' 57" W a distance of five 
hundred fifty-three and eighty-two hundredths feet (553.82') to a fixed point; thence turning 
along a radius to the right ninety feet (90.00') a distance of one hundred sixty-nine and fifty-nine 
hundredths feet (169.59') to a fixed point; thence turning along a radius to the right of thirty feet 
(30.00') a distance of twenty-seven and twenty-two hundredths feet (27.22') to a fixed point; 
thence turning along a radius to the left of forty-five feet (45.00') a distance of two hundred 
seventeen feet (217.00') to a fixed point; thence turning along a radius to the right of thirty feet 
(30.00') a distance of twenty-four and forty-six hundredths feet (24.46') to a fixed point; thence 
turning along a radius to the left of one hundred thirty feet (130.00') a distance of one hundred 
forty-five and thirteen hundredths feet (145.13') to a fixed point; thence turning and running S 
60° 43' 05" W a distance of thirteen and seventy-seven hundredths feet (13.77') to a fixed point; 
thence turning and running S 29 15' 55" E a distance of thirty-one and fifty-one hundredths feet 
(31.51') to a fixed point; thence turning and running S 68 °15' 55" E a distance of thirty feet 
(30.00') to a fixed point; thence turning along a radius to the left of one hundred thirty feet 
(130.00') a distance of forty-nine and eighty hundredths feet (49.80') to a fixed point; thence 
running S 68 ° 45' 57" E a distance of five hundred thirty-three and thirty-six hundredths feet 
(533.36') to a fixed point; thence turning and running northeasterly along a curved line with a 
radius of eight hundred twenty-five feet (825.00') and a distance of forty-four and ninety-three 
hundredths feet (44.93') to the point of beginning. 

The roadway parcel above describes the street layout of Jaques Lane and encompasses 
approximately 37,648 square feet. The street layout of Jaques Lane is approximately forty feet 
wide and is shown on the plan entitled "Plan of Land of Wilmington Massachusetts - Street 
Acceptance Plan Jaques Lane" with revision date January 18, 2012 , scale one inch equals 30 
feet, drawn by Design Consultants Inc., Somerville, MA 02145. Jaques Lane is approximately 
873 feet in length. 

d. Marion Street Extension - Beginning at a drill hole in a stone bound on the northerly side of 
Marion Street at the easterly sideline of land N/F owned by Thomas J Barrett. Thence N 62°-05'- 
22" E, twenty-seven and ninety-one hundredths feet (27.91') to a point; thence N 84°-30'-16" E, 
seventeen and seventy hundredths feet (17.70') to a point; thence N 70°-08'-58" E, eighty-four 
and twenty-eight hundredths feet (84.28') to a point; thence N 67°-00'-28" E, eighty-one and 
seventy-seven hundredths feet (81.77') to a point; thence N 63°-36'-39" E. ninety-six and thirty- 
three hundredths feet (96.33') thence N 63°-08°-49" E, thirty-nine and eighty-five hundredths 
feet (39.85') to a point; thence N 74°-07'-48" E, eighty-two and twenty-eight hundredths feet 
(82.28') to a point; thence N 79°-04'-52" E, seventy-nine and thirty-three hundredths feet (79.33') 
to the easterly side of Stuart Street. 

Thence N 79°-04'-51" E, fifty and ninety-five hundredths feet (50.95'); thence N 76°-55'-27" E, 
forty-eight and ninety-seven hundredths feet (48.97') to a stone bound; thence N 89°-52'-33" E, 
one hundred twenty-three and nine hundredths feet (123.09') to a point; thence; S 43°-03'-29" W, 
twenty-eight and six hundredths feet (28.06') to a point; thence S 52°-33'-15" E, thirty-one and 
forty-five hundredths feet (31.45') to a drill hole in base of a stone wall; thence S 82°-35'-20" W, 
sixty-six and seventy-one hundredths feet (66.71') to a stone bound; thence S 83°-55'-53" W, 
twenty-one and forty-nine hundredths feet (21.49) to a stone bound; thence S 88°-01'-14" W, 
eighty-one and six hundredths feet (81.06') to a stone bound; thence S 80°-17'-49" W, fifty-two 
and eighty-six hundredths feet (52.86') to a point. 

Thence S 80°-23'-43" W, sixty-nine and ninety-nine hundredths feet (69.99') to a point; thence S 
79°-04'-52" W a distance of five and forty-eight hundredths feet (5.48'), thence S 74°-07'48" W, 
seventy-seven and five hundredths feet (77.05') to a point; thence S 63°-12'-09" W thirty-six and 
six hundredths feet (36.06') to a point; thence S 63°-35'-26" W, ninety-seven and sixty-six 
hundredths feet (97.66') to a point; thence S 67°-00'-28" W, eighty-four and six hundredths feet 
(84.06') to a point; thence S 70°-08'-58" W, ninety and forty-one hundredths feet (90.41') to a 

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point; thence S 68°-39'-18" W, sixty and fifty hundredths feet (60.50') to a point; thence N 06°-23'- 
59" E, forty-six and eighty-nine hundredths feet (46.89') to a drill hole in a stone bound at the 
beginning point. 

Marion Street Extension is a variable width road and this portion contains in total 30,561 square 
feet more or less. This roadway layout parcel described above is shown on plans entitled 
"Wilmington Massachusetts Street Acceptance Plan for a portion of Marion Street Shown on 
Map 4 & 16" dated November 21, 2011, prepared by Reid Land Surveyors, Lynn MA, scale one 
inch equals 20 feet and "Wilmington Massachusetts Street Acceptance Plan for a portion of 
Marion Street Shown on Map 4" dated November 21, 2011, prepared by Reid Land Surveyors, 
Lynn MA, scale one inch equals 20 feet. The total length of this section of Marion Street 
Extension is approximately 715 feet. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article based on Planning Board recommendation. 

Planning Board recommended approval of this article. The roadways under consideration for 
acceptance were developed under subdivision control. 

MOTION: On motion of Ms. O'Connell and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that the following described streets, as recommended by the Planning Board 
and laid out by the Board of Selectmen pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 41 
and Chapter 82, as amended and shown on certain plans described below, be hereby accepted 
as town public ways and that the Board of Selectmen be hereby authorized to acquire by 
purchase, gift, eminent domain or otherwise, such land, slope and drainage or other 
easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of this article. 

Fiorenza Drive - As shown on plan entitled "Street Acceptance Plan, Andover Heights I & II, 
Fiorenza Drive & My Way Circle, Wilmington, Massachusetts," sheets 1 and 2, prepared by 
Dana F. Perkins, Inc., dated December 29, 2011, scale one inch equals 40 feet. 

My Way Circle - As shown on a plan entitled "Street Acceptance Plan, Andover Heights I & 
II, Fiorenza Drive & My Way Circle, Wilmington, Massachusetts," sheet 2, prepared by Dana 
F. Perkins, Inc., dated December 29, 2011, scale one inch equals 40 feet. 

Jaques Lane - As shown on the plan entitled "Plan of Land of Wilmington, Massachusetts - 
Street Acceptance Plan Jaques Lane" with revision date January 18, 2012, scale one inch 
equals 30 feet, drawn by Design Consultants, Inc., Somerville, MA 02145. 

Marion Street Extension - As shown on plans entitled "Wilmington, Massachusetts Street 
Acceptance Plan for a portion of Marion Street shown on Map 4 & 16" dated November 21, 
2011, prepared by Reid Land Surveyors, Lynn MA, scale one inch equals 20 feet and 
"Wilmington, Massachusetts Street Acceptance Plan for a portion of Marion Street shown on 
Map 4" dated November 21, 2011, prepared by Reid Land Surveyors, Lynn MA, scale one 
inch equals 20 feet. 

ARTICLE 20. (drawn #33) To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of 
the Town of Wilmington, Revised, by adding a new section 52.4 to Chapter 5 as follows: 

52.4 - Enforcement and Penalties 

As an alternative to criminal prosecution under applicable provisions of the General 
Laws, including, but not limited to, General Laws Chapter 266, Section 120, the 
Town, acting through its Police Department, may elect to use the non-criminal 
disposition procedure set forth in General Laws Chapter 40, Section 2 ID. The 
penalty for violation of this section 52 shall be $100.00 for the first offense and 
$150.00 for each offense thereafter. 

or take any other action related thereto. 



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Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Cimaglia and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Revised be 
amended by adding a new section 52.4 to Chapter 5 as follows: 

52.4 - Enforcement and Penalties 

As an alternative to criminal prosecution under applicable provisions of the 
General Laws, including, but not limited to, General Laws Chapter 266, Section 
120, the Town, acting through its Police Department, may elect to use the non- 
criminal disposition procedure set forth in General Laws Chapter 40, Section 
21D. The penalty for violation of this section 52 shall be $100.00 for the first 
offense and $150.00 for each offense thereafter. 

ARTICLE 21 . (drawn #34) To see if the Town will vote to accept as a gift a parcel of land, being 
shown as Lot 11 on a plan entitled "Andover Heights Definitive Subdivision Plan, Fiorenza Drive, 
Wilmington, Mass," dated October 17, 1989, revised April 27, 1992, scale 1" = 40', Robert E. 
Anderson, Inc., Engineer, recorded with the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds at Plan Book 
179, Plan 50. Said Lot 11 containing 44,098 square feet of land, more or less, according to said Plan; 
or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article based on Planning Board recommendation. 

Planning Board recommended approval of this article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. McCoy and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in the 
affirmative that the Town vote to accept as a gift a parcel of land being shown as Lot 11 on a 
plan entitled "Andover Heights Definitive Subdivision Plan, Fiorenza Drive, Wilmington, 
Mass," dated October 17, 1989, revised April 27, 1992, scale 1" = 40', Robert E. Anderson, 
Inc., Engineer, recorded with the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds at Plan Book 
179, Plan 50. Said Lot 11 containing 44,098 square feet of land, more or less, according to 
said Plan. 

ARTICLE 22. (drawn #26) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire by purchase, gift or eminent domain the parcel of land containing approximately 20.3 acres, 
located at 9 Cross Street in Wilmington, known as Town of Wilmington Assessor Map 39, Parcel 5 
and further described as Lot 1 on the plan entitled "Plan of Land, Yentile's Farm, #9 Cross Street in 
Wilmington, Mass.," dated July 27, 2005 and recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds in 
Plan Book 218 as Plan No. 134 on file with the Town Clerk's Office for open space, recreation and 
general municipal purposes; and further to see if the Town will vote to appropriate, borrow pursuant 
to any applicable statute or transfer from available funds, a sum of money for such purposes; or take 
any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Newhouse and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 
122 in favor, opposed that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to acquire by purchase, 
gift or eminent domain the parcel of land located at 9 Cross Street in Wilmington, containing 
approximately 20.3 acres and shown as Parcel 5 on Assessors Map 39 and further described 
as Lot 1 on a plan entitled "Plan of Land, Yentile Farm, 9 Cross Street, Wilmington, Mass., 
dated July 27, 2005 and recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 218 
as plan No. 134 on file with the Town Clerk's office for open space, recreation and other 
general municipal purposes; and further to appropriate from Available Funds - Free Cash 
the amount of One Million One Hundred Eighty-Two Thousand Five Hundred Dollars 
($1.182,500) to acquire said property. 



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ARTICLE 23. (drawn #39) To see of the Town will vote to petition the General Court and to request 
its representatives in the General Court to seek enactment of special legislation for the Town in the 
form set forth below: 

Notwithstanding any general or special law to the contrary, including but not limited to the 
provisions of chapter one hundred twenty-one B, sections four and five, of the General Laws, the 
Town of Wilmington Redevelopment Authority shall be dissolved as of the date on which this 
act takes effect and any funds held in the name of such authority by any banking institution 
shall revert to the general fund of the Town of Wilmington. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Champoux and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that the Town vote to petition the General Court and to request its 
representatives in the General Court to seek enactment of special legislation for the Town in 
the form set forth below: 

Notwithstanding any general or special law to the contrary, including but not limited to the 
provisions of chapter one hundred twenty-one B, sections four and five, of the General Laws, 
the Town of Wilmington Redevelopment Authority shall be dissolved as of the date on which 
this act takes effect and any funds held in the name of such authority by any banking 
institution shall revert to the general fund of the Town of Wilmington. 

ARTICLE 24 . (drawn #28) To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer of the care, custody, 
management and control of certain parcels of land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter 
described to the Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no 
longer needed for any municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen be and are hereby 
authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as is owned by the Town of Wilmington and 
upon such terms and conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 
3, Section 16 of the By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels and 
interest are described as Map 80, Parcel 42B (not declared surplus); or take any other action related 
thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article pending all issues being 
remediated. 

Planning Board recommended approval of this Article if the determination is made that the 
land is surplus to the needs of the Town. 

The petitioner withdrew this article in writing. 

ARTICLE 25. (drawn # 23) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter 
into an agreement, the terms of which shall be determined by the Selectmen, to sell, convey or 
otherwise dispose of any land within the parcel depicted by Assessors Map 6 as Map 6 Parcels 146, 
146A, 149 and 150 in which the Town might claim a right, title or interest to, following a 
determination made by the Town Manager that such land is not needed for any municipal purpose, 
in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington Revised and other applicable law; or take any other action related thereto. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Caira and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in the 
affirmative to pass over Article 25. 



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ARTICLE 26 . (drawn #20) To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of 
the Town of Wilmington, Revised by adding the following new Chapter 5, Public Regulations, Section 
35, Fencing, as follows: 

FENCING 

SECTION 53. Fencing constructed on residential or commercial zoned property within the 
Town of Wilmington shall comply with the following: 

1. All fencing shall be constructed in compliance with Massachusetts General Laws 
and Building Codes. 

2. All fencing along a property boundary line shall be installed with finished side 
facing the abutting property, unless written consent is obtained from abutting 
property owner. 

3. Fences may be installed up to a property boundary line, but no portion of any 
holes excavated for the installation offence posts shall be located on an abutting 
property and no portion of a fence may overhang an abutting property without 
written permission from the abutting property owner. 

4. All fencing shall be compatible with property use and the scenic character of the 
Town, safe, structurally sound and uniform or compatible in color and structure. 
All fences shall be maintained so that they do not constitute a hazard, blight or 
condition of disrepair. Examples of hazards, blight or conditions of disrepair 
include, but are not necessarily limited to, leaning fences, fences that are missing 
slats, blocks or structural elements, graffiti, peeling paint or rotting or damaged 
materials. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. 

Mr. George Lingenfelter, Concord Street, discussed the purpose of his article. He stated that his 
neighbors constructed a fence using plywood and blue tarp and he does not feel the fence is 
structurally sound. Parts of the plywood were almost falling over. He feels this is a spite fence by 
his neighbors. 

Discussion ensued with several residents speaking in opposition. Ms. Johnston, Thurston Avenue, 
stated she was in opposition, but stated she had sympathy for Mr. Lingenfelter. Mario Marchese, 
Somerset Place, stood in opposition. 

MOTION: Mr. George Lingenfelter moved the adoption of Article 26 which was duly 
seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted to defeat Article 26. 

Mr. Lingenfelter questioned the voice vote taken by the Moderator on Article 26. The 
Moderator stated that six other residents also needed to stand. Six residents did rise and the 
Moderator called on the tellers for a counted vote. 

Counted vote by tellers: Yes: 39 No: 84 

MOTION FAILS 



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ARTICLE 27. (drawn #32) To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 137 of the Acts of 2003. 



An Act Relative to Public Employees Serving in the Armed Forces of the United States 

Whereas, The deferred operation of this act would tend to defeat its purpose, which is to protect 
forthwith the salaries of certain public employees who served or are serving in the armed forces, 
therefore it is hereby declared to be an emergency law, necessary for the immediate preservation of 
the public convenience. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court assembled, and by the 
authority of the same, as follows: 

SECTION 1. Notwithstanding any general or special law to the contrary, an employee in the 
service of the commonwealth or a county, city or town that accepts this section as provided in 
this section, including an employee of a school district, who has been granted a military leave 
of absence because the employee is a member of the army national guard, the air national 
guard or a reserve component of the armed forces of the United States called to active service 
in the armed forces of the United States after September 11, 2001, shall be entitled to receive 
pay at his regular base salary as such a public employee, and shall not lose any seniority or 
any accrued vacation leave, sick leave, personal leave, compensation time or earned 
overtime. An employee eligible under this section shall be paid his regular base salary as 
such a public employee for each pay period of such military leave of absence after September 
11, 2001, reduced by any amount received from the United States as pay or allowance for 
military service performed during the same pay period, excluding overtime pay, shift 
differential pay, hazardous duty pay or any other additional compensation. For the purposes 
of this section, the words "active service" shall not include active duty for training in the 
army national guard or air national guard or as a reservist in the armed forces of the United 
States. This section shall take effect in a county, city or town upon its acceptance in a 
county, by vote of the county commissioners; in a city or town, as provided in section 4 of 
chapter 4 of the General Laws; and in a regional school district, by vote of the school 
committee. Nothing in this section shall limit or reduce a person's entitlement to benefits 
under section 59 of chapter 33 of the General Laws, and nothing in this section shall entitle a 
person to benefits in excess of the maximum benefit provided under said section 59 of said 
chapter 33 for any period during which that person is receiving benefits under this section. 

SECTION 2 . Notwithstanding any general or special law to the contrary, state agencies and 
municipal governments may expend in the current fiscal year associated costs incurred in 
prior fiscal years pursuant to this act. 

SECTION 3. Notwithstanding any general or special law to the contrary, any employee 
eligible for retirement under section 616 of chapter 26 of the acts of 2003 who was stationed 
outside of the commonwealth on active military duty during the period from July 15, 2003 
through September 1, 2003, inclusive, shall file his application for retirement with the state 
board of retirement within 30 days of discharge from active military duty outside the 
commonwealth or within 30 days of the effective date of this act. The retirement date 
requested shall be no more than 60 days and no less than 30 days from the date said 
application is fded with the state board of retirement. 

SECTION 21 . Sections 1, 2 and 3 shall expire on September 11, 2005. 
Approved November 26, 2003. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this article. 

Mr. William Cavanaugh, spoke on his article stating he would like to amend his article by adding a 
document that showed the above act was amended up to 2014. John Doherty, Finance Committee 



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Chairman, stated no cost study has been performed. Mr. Caira discussed that there are fiduciary 
questions that would need to be answered. 

Discussion continued regarding base pay and several residents stating that the new document that 
Mr. Cavanaugh is not in front of the body. Mrs. Yurek stated the language was not quite right. 
Mr. Cimaglia stated that only employees affected would be those called up for active (Afghanistan 
and Iraq) duty. 

Town Counsel discussed how this particular act was amended through the 2011 State budget. State 
Representative Miceli was in support of the article and believes the cost to the State was minimal. 

Mr. Champoux discussed the spirit of the amendments and they have not changed. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Cavanaugh and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 
74 in favor and 27 in opposition to adopt Chapter 137 Acts of 2003 as amended. 

ARTICLE 28. (drawn #35) To see if the Town will vote to petition the General Court and to request 
its representatives in the General Court to seek enactment of special legislation for the Town in the 
form set forth below; or take any other action related thereto. 

AN ACT AMENDING THE CHARTER OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON 

Section 7 of the Town Charter, St. 1950, c. 592, sees. 1, et seq., is amended by striking from the first 
sentence of such section 7 the following clause: 

", for a term of three years," 

So that section 7, as amended, reads as follows: 

SECTION 7. Appointment of Town Manager. The Selectmen elected as provided herein 
shall appoint, as soon as practicable, for a term of two years, a Town Manager who shaD be a 
person especially fitted by education, training and previous full time paid experience as a 
town or city manager, assistant manager, or a corporate president to perform the duties of 
the office. The Town Manager shall be appointed without regard to his political beliefs. He 
need not be a resident of the town or this commonwealth when appointed, but shall not 
during the twelve months prior to his appointment have held any elective office in the Town 
of Wilmington. He may be appointed for successive terms of office. Before entering upon the 
duties of his office, the Town Manager shall be sworn to the faithful and impartial 
performance thereof by the Town Clerk or a Justice of the Peace. He shall execute a bond in 
favor of the town for the faithful performance of his duties in such sum and with such surety 
or sureties as may be fixed or approved by the Selectmen. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this article. 

Mr. Richard Hayden, Finance Committee, stated the restrictions could be harmful. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Michael Bodnar to adopt Article 28 which was duly seconded, 
the Town of Wilmington voted to defeat Article 28. 

ARTICLE 29. (drawn #30) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and associated 
Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington as follows; or take any other action related thereto. 

By rezoning from Residence 20 (R20) to Neighborhood Business (NB) the following parcel of 
land: 159 Church Street. Such parcel is listed on the Assessors' records as Map 63, Parcel 
10. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this article based on Planning Board 
recommendation. 



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Planning Board recommended disapproval of this article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. MacDonald to adopt Article 29 which was duly seconded, the 
Town of Wilmington voted to defeat Article 29. 

ARTICLE 30. (drawn #36) To see if the Town will vote to preserve Wilmington High School and 
prevent it from being demolished; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this article. 

Town Counsel stated that Article 30 was Out of Order. 

ARTICLE 31 . (drawn #27) To see if the Town will vote to stipulate a residence requirement for 
construction jobs for the new Wilmington High School construction project to be constructed at 159 
Church Street. This requirement shall require contractors to fill construction trade and laborer 
positions with construction tradesmen/tradeswomen and laborers who are Wilmington residents; or 
take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this article. 

Mr. Bodnar made a case for the numerous out-of-work electricians, carpenters, etc. 

Town Counsel stated the Superior Court of the Commonwealth has ruled such cases unconstitutional 
and he would rule Article 31 Out of Order. 

ARTICLE 32. (drawn #18) To see if the Town will vote to rescind the vote taken at the 2011 Special 
Town Meeting to finance the new high school to be constructed at 159 Church Street; or take any 
other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this Article. 

The Moderator stated this was one of the four articles that were going to be ruled out of order. 

Mr. MacDonald stated he would like to make an amendment that would bring the article into 
"order." 

Town Counsel stated that the article and amendment were Out of Order. 

Mr. MacDonald stated that he wanted to appeal the decision of the Moderator. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. MacDonald, and seconded by Mr. Burnham, to appeal the 
decision of the Moderator. Motion defeated by voice vote. 

Mr. MacDonald stated he wanted to reconsider the vote. 

The Moderator asked Mr. MacDonald if he voted on the prevailing side and Mr. MacDonald said that 
he did. Other voters around Mr. MacDonald disputed that he did not vote in favor. 

The Moderator stated it is disingenuous of Mr. MacDonald to say he voted on the prevailing side of 
his appeal of the Moderator's decision when he was the person who made the motion. 

The Moderator told Mr. MacDonald he was done and to sit down. 



-147- 



ARTICLE 33. (drawn #19) To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and transfer from 
free cash a sum of $5,000 to establish a Town website for the purpose of allowing residents of the 
Town to post and identify problems and to offer solutions so that problems could be solved and so 
other residents with similar concerns can collaborate to join forces to effect change for the 
betterment of the community; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this article. 

Several residents spoke including, Mr. Lingenfelter and Mr. MacDonald, who spoke in favor. Ms. 
Angela Law asked Mr. MacDonald how he came to a figure of $5,000 and continued with asking if he 
went out for competitive bids to come to this figure. Mr. Burnham said he thought residents should 
use the existing town website. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. MacDonald to adopt Article 33 which was duly seconded, the 
Town of Wilmington defeated Article 33. 

ARTICLE 34. (drawn #25) To see if the Town will vote to prevent Wilmington High School from 
being demolished, and appropriate and transfer from available free cash funds, private foundation 
grant funds, or government grant funds a sum of $250,000 to design and engineer a transformation 
of Wilmington High School into a community college on the second floor and business space on the 
first floor to be combined into a co-op work/study economic and educational development; or take any 
other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this Article. 
Article 34 was ruled Out of Order by Moderator. 

ARTICLE 35. (drawn #38) To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and transfer from available 
funds a sum of $250,000 to be expended for the purpose of conducting a feasibility study for the 
construction of Wilmington High School at the property located at 9 Cross Street identified as Parcel 
5 on Assessors' Map 39 consisting of approximately 20.47 acres. This study shall go out for 
competitive bid and shall be contingent on a favorable vote at the 2012 Annual Town Meeting to 
purchase this property; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this article. 

Article 35 was passed over. 

ARTICLE 36. (drawn #22) To see if the Town will vote to rescind Section 51 of Chapter 5 
"COMPREHENSIVE STORMWATER MANAGEMENT BY-LAW" from the By-laws of the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this article based on Planning Board 
recommendation. 

Planning Board recommended disapproval of this article. Without a Stormwater Management 
process implemented EPA would impose fines on the Town. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. MacDonald to adopt Article 36 which was duly seconded, the 
Town of Wilmington defeated Article 36. 

ARTICLE 37. (drawn #21) To see if the Town will vote to amend and add to, update and revise the 
"Official Map" of the Town of Wilmington, dated January 1, 1973, prepared for the Planning Board 
by the Engineering Department and adopted by the Town of Wilmington under Article 17, of the 
Warrant for Special Town Meeting of June 25, 1973, and recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of 
Deeds on August 20, 1973, in Book of Plans M, Plan 712, to show the existing private way, known as 
Poplar Street and laid out by the board of surveyors and shown on a plan of land recorded at the 
Middlesex North Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 26, Plan 36 as Wilmington Gardens Addition; 
pursuant to Massachusetts General Law Chapter 41, Sections 81 E, F & G. 



-148- 



Poplar Street - From the intersection of Walnut Street and Poplar Street a distance of 239 
feet more or less southerly, from lot number 191-196 inclusive as shown on a subdivision 
plan, entitled Wilmington Gardens Addition dated June 12, 1909 and recorded at the 
Middlesex North Registry of Deeds at Plan Book 26, Plan 36. 

Provided said map has been lawfully adopted, maintained and is still valid; or take any other action 
related thereto. 

Finance Committee took no action on this article. 
Planning Board recommended disapproval of this article. 

Mr. Mark Nelson gave a brief history surrounding Poplar Street. He stated Poplar Street was not a 
paper road. 

Mr. Michael Sorrentino, Planning Board Chairman, stated no plan was submitted and his request 
was denied pursuant to Chapter 41, Sections E, F, G, W and Y. 

Mr. Newhouse stated that the Official Map gives more control over development. There are some 
grandfathered lots. The Petitioner should apply as all other people do. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Nelson and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 15 in 
favor, 72 in opposition to approve Article 37. Motion fails for lack of two-thirds vote. 

ARTICLE 38. (drawn #37) To see if the Town will vote to amend and add to, update and revise the 
"Official Map" of the Town of Wilmington, dated January 1, 1973, prepared for the Planning Board 
by the Engineering Department and adopted by the Town of Wilmington under Article 17 of the 
Warrant for Special Town Meeting of June 25, 1973, and recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of 
Deeds on August 20, 1973, in Book of Plans M, Plan 712, to show the existing private way, known as 
Polk Street (formerly Cedar street) and laid out by the Board of Surveyors and shown on a plan of 
land recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 26, Plan 36 as Wilmington 
Gardens Addition, pursuant to Massachusetts General Law Chapter 41, Sections 81 E, F & G. 

Polk Street - From the intersection of Walnut Street and Polk Street a distance of 527 feet 
more or less southerly, from lot number 274-291 inclusive as shown on a subdivision plan 
entitled Wilmington Gardens Addition dated June 12, 1909 and recorded at the Middlesex 
North Registry of Deeds at Plan Book 26, Plan 36. 

Provided said map has been lawfully adopted, maintained and is still valid; or take any other action 
related thereto. 

Finance Committee took no action on this article. 
Planning Board recommended disapproval of this article. 

Mr. Nelson gave a similar presentation on Article 38. He described the plan for Polk Street and to 
Section 81E to have Polk Street on the official map. He stated he had sewer bills, etc, but no 
occupancy permit. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Nelson and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 42 in 
favor, 36 in opposition to approve Article 38. Motion fails for lack of two-thirds vote. 

ARTICLE 39. (drawn #29) To see if the Town will vote to establish a by-law requiring the Town 
Treasurer to deposit all Town free cash funds in accounts at credit unions in Massachusetts as 
opposed to banks; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this article. 

-149- 



Article 39 was ruled Out of Order by Town Counsel. 

MOTION: A motion to adjourn was made, seconded and so voted. 

214 registered voters of Wilmington attended the Annual Town Meeting. 33 non- voters were also in 
attendance. 

STATE PRIMARY SEPTEMBER 6, 2012 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 

TO: THE CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in Elections at the Boutwell School (Precincts 1 
and 2), Wildwood School (Precincts 3 and 4) and Town Hall (Precincts 5 and 6) on Thursday, the 
sixth day of September, 2012 from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Primary for the candidates of the political parties for the following 
officers: 



Senator in Congress 
Representative in Congress 
Councilor 

Senator in General Court 
Representative in General Court 
Register of Deeds 
Sheriff 

DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



For the Commonwealth 
Sixth Congressional District 
Fifth Congressional District 
1 st Essex & Middlesex District 
Nineteenth District 
Middlesex County 
Middlesex County 



Senator in Congress 
Elizabeth A. Warren 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 

Representative in Congress 

John F. Tierney 

All Others 

Blanks 

Total 



555 
31 
126 



712 



546 
11 
155 



712 



Councilor 
Donald Bumiller 
Eileen R. Duff 
David W. Eppley 
George T. O'Brine 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 



82 
277 
90 
66 
1 

196 



712 



-150- 



Senator in General Court 

No Nomination 

All Others 144 

Blanks 568 

Total 712 

Representative in General Court (19 th ) 

James R. Miceli 549 

All Others 64 

Blanks 5 

Total 618 

Representative in General Court (21 st ) 

Charles A. Murphy 35 

David Fionda 36 

Kenneth Gordon 7 

All Others 

Blanks 16 

Total 94 

Clerk of Courts 

Michael A. Sullivan 545 

All Others 

Blanks 167 

Total 712 

Register of Deeds 

Richard P. Howe, Jr. 534 

All Others 3 

Blanks 175 

Total 712 

Sheriff 

Peter J. Koutoujian 544 

All Others 5 

Blanks 163 

Total 712 

REPUBLICAN PARTY 

Senator in Congress 

Scott P. Brown 606 

All Others 4 

Blanks 9 

Total 619 

Representative in Congress 

Richard R. Tisei 543 

Bill Hudak 1 

All Others 6 

Blanks 69 

Total 619 

Councilor 

Maura L.P. Ciardiello 460 

All Others 1 

Blanks 158 

Total 619 



-151- 



Senator in General Court 

Bruce E. Tarr 552 

All Others 1 

Blanks 66 

Total 619 

Representative in Congress (19 th ) 

Douglas W. Sears 388 

All Others 7 

Blanks 136 

Total 531 

Representative in Congress (21 st ) 

Walter T. Zenkin (write-in) 25 

All Others 

Blanks 63 

Total 88 



GREEN-RAINBOW PARTY 

There were no nominations or votes cast in the State Primary. 

All polling places were opened at 7:00 a.m. and closed at 8:00 p.m. A total of 1,331 registered voters 
cast ballots on September 6, 2012, which represents approximately 8% of 15,378 registered voters. 

STATE ELECTION - NOVEMBER 6, 2012 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: THE CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON 



GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in Elections at the Boutwell School (Precincts 1 
and 2), Wildwood School (Precincts 3 and 4) and Town Hall (Precincts 5 and 6) on Tuesday, 
November 6, 2012 from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Election for the candidates of the political parties for the following 
officers: 



Electors of President & Vice President 
Senator in Congress 
Representative in Congress 
Councilor 

Senator in General Court 
Representative General Court 
Representative in General Court 
Clerk of Courts 
Register of Deeds 
Sheriff 



Statewide 
Statewide 

6 th Congressional District 
5 th District 

1 st Essex & Middlesex 
19 th Middlesex District 
21 st Middlesex - Precinct 3 
Middlesex County 
Middlesex Northern District 
Middlesex County 



Electors of President & Vice President 



Johnson and Gray - Libertarian 120 

Obama and Biden - Democrat 5,904 

Romney and Ryan - Republican 6,452 

Stein and Honkala - Green-Rainbow 42 

Write-in 4,235 

Blanks 50 

Total 12,603 



-152- 



Senator in Congress 

Scott P. Brown - Republican 7,698 

Elizabeth A. Warren - Democrat 4,825 

Write-in 1 1 

Blanks 67 

Total 12,603 

Representative in Congress 

John F. Tierney - Democrat 4,966 

Richard R. Tisei - Republican 6,397 

Daniel Fishman - Libertarian 524 

Write-in 20 

Blanks 696 

Total 12,603 

Councilor 

Maura L. P. Ciardiello - Republican 5,366 

Eileen R. Duff - Democrat 5, 188 

Write-in 39 

Blanks 2.010 

Total 12,603 

Senator in General Court 

Bruce E. Tarr - Republican 9,253 

Blanks 3,224 

Write-in 126 

Total 12,603 

Representative in General Court (19 th ) 

James R. Miceli - Democrat 7,851 

Douglas W. Sears - Republican 2,281 

Write-in 21 

Blanks 493 

Total 10,646 




President ]ohn Adams (aka George Baker) works the poll at 
Wilmington Memorial Library 



-153- 



Representative in General Court (21 st ) 



Kenneth I. Gordon - Democrat 843 

Walter A. Zenkin - Republican 854 

Write-in 7 

Blanks 253 

Total 1,957 



Clerk of Courts Middlesex County 

Michael A. Sullivan - Democrat 

Write-in 

Blanks 

Total 



8,799 
125 
3.679 
12,603 



Register of Deeds 

Richard P. Howe 8,647 

Write-in 117 

Blanks 3,839 

Total 12,603 



Sheriff 

Peter J. Koutoujian - Democrat 6,795 

Ernesto M. Petrone - Unenrolled 3,062 

Write-in 47 

Blanks 2,699 

Total 12,603 



Questions 



Question One - Law Proposed bv Initiative Petition 



Do you approve of a law that would require motor vehicle manufacturers to allow vehicle owners and 
independent repair facilities in Massachusetts to have access to the same vehicle diagnostic and 
repair information made available to the manufacturers' Massachusetts dealers and authorized 
repair facilities? 



Yes 8,109 

No 2,692 

Write-in 

Blanks 1,802 

Total 12,603 



Question Two - Law Proposed bv Initiative Petition 



Do you approve of a law that would allow a physician licensed in Massachusetts to prescribe 
medication, at the request of a terminally-ill patient meeting certain conditions, to end that person's 
life? 



Yes 5,572 

No 6,563 

Write-in 

Blanks 468 

Total 12,603 



-154- 



Question Three - Law Proposed bv Initiative Petition 



Do you approve of a law that would eliminate state criminal and civil penalties related to the 
medical use of marijuana, allowing patients meeting certain conditions to obtain marijuana produced 
and distributed by new state-regulated centers or, in specific hardship cases, to grow marijuana for 
their own use? 



Yes 6,983 

No 4,989 

Write-in 

Blanks 631 

Total 12,603 



Question Four (Precinct 3) - Non-Binding 



Shall the state senator from this district be instructed to vote in favor of a resolution calling upon 
Congress to repeal the federal prohibition of marijuana, so that states may regulate it as they 
choose? 



Yes 6,097 

No 4,477 

Write-in 

Blanks 2,029 

Total 12,603 



Our three polling places were opened at 7:00 a.m. and closed at 8:00 p.m. Election Day in 
Wilmington proved to be extremely busy with a very heavy volume in the morning; with a continued 
steady pace throughout the day. The number of ballots cast was 12,603, which represented 80.8% of 
our 15,611 registered voters. The Town Clerk's office would like to thank all Town Departments; 
and special thanks to Linda Golden, Asst. Town Clerk, Nancy Beals, Senior Clerk, and all of our 
terrific poll workers. 




-155- 



Directory of Officials - Jannuary 1, 2013 



Board of Selectmen 



Town Manager 
Moderator 



School Committee 



Superintendent of Schools 
Finance Committee 



Michael J. Newhouse, Chairman 2013 

Michael L. Champoux 2015 

Louis Cimaglia, IV 2013 

Michael V. McCoy 2014 

Judith L. O'Connell 2014 

Jeffrey M. Hull 

James C. Stewart 2015 

Margaret A. Kane, Chairman 2013 

Robert L. Hayes, Vice Chairman 2013 

Virginia M. Bonish, Secretary 2014 

Kathleen M. Carroll 2013 

Leslee A. Quick 2014 

Mary Jane Byrnes 2015 

Manny L. Mulas 2015 

Joanne M. Benton 

John F. Doherty, III, Chairman 2014 

Theresa M. Manganelli, Vice Chairman 2014 

Victoria L. Ellsworth, Secretary 2013 

Jonathan R. Eaton 2013 

Jordan H. Weiner 2013 

Robert P. Palmer 2014 

Richard K. Hayden 2015 

Bernard P. Nally, Jr. 2015 

William J. Wallace 2015 



-156- 



Boards, Committees & Commissions - January 1, 2013 



Term 
Expires 



Appeals, Board of 

Charles E. Boyle, Chairman 2016 

Daniel J. Veerman 2013 

Anthony J. Barletta, Jr. 2014 

Edward P. Loud 2015 

Thomas W. Siracusa 2017 



Assessors, Board of 

Karen L. Rassias, Principal Assessor 
Anthony E. Krzeminski 
Roger J. Lessard 

By-Law Study Committee 

Robert H. Spencer, Chairman 

James F. Banda 

Scott C. Garrant 

Walter J. Kaminski 

Joan D. Searfoss 

Selectman Liaison 

Sharon A. George, Ex-Officio 

Cable TV Advisory Task Force 

Jeffrey M. Hull, Chairman 
Sandra S. Curtin 
Neil Ellis 



Carter Lecture Fund Committee 

Adele C. Passmore, Chairman 2013 

Ann H. Berghaus, Rec. Sec. 2015 

Andrea B. Houser, Corr. Sec. 2014 

Margaret A. St. Onge 2015 

Julia E. Doten 2013 

Cemetery Commission 

Cynthia A. McCue, Chairman 2013 

Pasquale D' Antonio 2014 

Judith A. Simmons 2015 

Conservation Commission 

Donald J. Pearson, Chairman 2013 

Frank J. Ingram, Vice Chairman 2013 

Lisa J. Johnson 2013 

Julie A. Flynn 2014 

Sharon M. Kelley Parrella 2014 

Charles R. Fiore 2015 

Vincent Licciardi 2015 



Term 
Expires 



Disabilities, Commission on 

Phyllis P. Genetti, Chairman 2014 

Frank A. Botte 2013 

Joseph P. Franceschi, Jr. 2013 
Selectman Liaison 

Elderly Services Commission 

Mary S. D'Eon, Chairman 2015 

Francis Sferrazza, Vice Chairman 2013 

John J. King 2013 

Mary Smith 2013 

Stanley Dancewicz, Jr. 2014 

John Wallace 2014 

Gayle A. Regan 2015 



Emergency Management Committee 

Jeffrey M. Hull 
Kendra L. Amaral 
Michael R. Begonis 
Edward G. Bradbury, Jr. 
George W. Hooper, II 
Michael Morris 
Shelly M. Newhouse 
Donald N. Onusseit 
John T. Spaulding 
Michael J. Woods 



Health, Board of 

Elizabeth E. Sabounjian, Chairman 2014 

James A. Ficociello, V. Chairman 2013 

Jane A. Williams- Vale 2015 

Historical Commission 

Carolyn R. Harris, Chairman 2014 

Stephen Lawrenson 2013 

Bonny A. Smith 2013 

Gerald R. Duggan 2014 

Kimberly L. Nguyen 2014 

Kathleen Black-Reynolds 2015 

Diane T. Harvey 2015 

Housing Authority 

Stacie A. Murphy, Chairman 2017 
Robert C. DiPasquale, Vice Chairman 2013 

Leona C. Bombard, Treasurer 2015 

Gregory B. Bendel 2016 



Vacancy (State Appointee) 



-157- 



Boards, Committees & Commissions - January 1, 2013 



Term 
Expires 



Library Trustees 

Eileen L. MacDougall, Chairman 2014 

James M. Lemay, Vice Chairman 2014 

Susanne L. Clarkin 2013 

Donald J. Pearson 2013 

Karen E. Campbell 2015 

Joan S. Grady 2015 
James Banda, Sr., Trustee Emeritus 
Anne Buzzell, Trustee Emeritus 

Permanent Building Committee 

George W. Hooper, II, Chairman 2014 

Joseph J. Parrella, Jr. 2013 

John C. Holloway 2014 

Diane M. Allan 2015 

Paul J. Melaragni 2015 

Planning Board 

Michael A. Sorrentino, Chairman 2017 

Ann L. Yurek, Clerk 2014 

James F. Banda, Jr. 2013 

Randi R. Holland 2015 

J. Christopher Neville 2016 



Term 
Expires 



Registrars, Board of 

Priscilla R. Ward, Chairman 2013 

Edward L. Sousa 2014 

Alice M. Hooper 2015 
Sharon A. George, Clerk 

Scholarship Fund Committee 

Joanne M. Benton, Chairman 2014 

Susanne L. Clarkin 2014 

Carol A. King 2014 

Michele Caira Nortonen 2014 

Robert G. Peterson 2014 

Lisa A. Troy 2014 

Trustees of Trust Funds 

Michael Morris, Chairman 2015 

Michelle L. Gomes 2015 

Pamela L. MacKenzie 2015 

Water and Sewer Commissioners 

Joseph J. Balliro, Jr., Chairman 2013 

George R. Allan 2014 

Robert W. La Vita 2015 



Recreation Commission 

C. Michael Burns, Chairman 2014 

Sheila Burke, Vice Chairman 2015 

Charles Biondo 2013 

Mark Kennedy 2013 

Laurie Robarge 2015 

Regional Vocational Technical 
School Committee 

Robert G. Peterson 2013 

James M. Gillis 2015 



Wilmington Arts Council 

Jane M. Crane, Chairman 2013 

Barbara Forrestall 2014 

Jean A. Chang 2014 

Marguerite Elia 2014 

Linda Molloy* 2013 

Sara B. Campbell 2014 



* Advisory Board Member 



-158- 



Boards^ Committees & Commissions - January 1, 2013 



Wilmington Election Officers - Term Expires Annually 



Precinct 1 

Mary D'Eon, Warden 
Mary Schultz, Deputy Clerk 
Clarice J. Ross, Inspector 
Wendy Diecidue, Alternate 
Carolyn Kenney, Alternate 
Kim Mytych, Alternate 
Ann Peters, Alternate 

Precinct 3 

Patricia McKenna, Warden 
Shirley Brush, Inspector 
Loretta R. Caira, Inspector 
Carol King, Inspector 
Janice Quandt, Inspector 
Ruth Holbrook, Alternate 
Taryn Martiniello, Alternate 
Medora Miller, Alternate 
Michele Nortonen, Alternate 
Alma DAntonio, Alternate 

Precinct 5 

Cynthia McCue, Warden 
Maureen Fiorenza, Deputy Warden 
Jeanne Grant, Inspector 
Nita Beals, Inspector 
Robert Beals, Alternate 
Beverly Dalton, Alternate 
Jane Crane, Alternate 
Elizabeth Lawrenson, Alternate 
Paige Miller, Alternate 
Julie Murphy, Alternate 
Kathleen Scanlon, Alternate 



Precinct 2 

Alfred Antinarelli, Warden 
Jeanne Buck, Deputy Warden 
Elizabeth Roberts, Deputy Clerk 
Helen Brady, Inspector 
Andrea Houser, Inspector 
Robert J. Sweet, Inspector 
Rosalie McConologue, Alternate 
Susan McNamara, Alternate 
Joyce Murray, Alternate 
Gayle Regan, Alternate 
Audrey E. Riddle, Alternate 

Precinct 4 

Sarah H. Cosman, Warden 
Joan Searfoss, Deputy Warden 
Gail Gass, Inspector 
Phyllis Hailey, Inspector 
Joanna E. Clayton, Alternate 
Donna Giannantonio, Alternate 
Lorraine A. Hermann, Alternate 
Mary Lunetta, Alternate 
Deborah Steen, Alternate 

Precinct 6 

Donald Armstrong, Warden 
Jean C. Lefavour, Inspector 
Mary F. Kiesinger, Inspector 
Jean Mazzocca, Inspector 
James Buckley, Alternate 
Karen Campbell, Alternate 
Lillian Gigliotti, Alternate 
Rosemary Greco, Alternate 
Mary Ann Steen, Alternate 
Cynthia Walsh, Alternate 
Margaret White, Alternate 



-159- 



Officers and Department Heads - January 1, 2013 



Accountant 


Michael Morris 


694-2029 


Administrative Assistant 


Beverly J. Dalton 


658-3311 


Animal Control/Inspector 


Ellen G. Davis Sawyer 


658-5071 


Assistant Town Manager 


Kendra L. Amaral 


658-3311 


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Engineering Director 


Anthony Pronski 


boo-449y 


Fence Viewer 


Anthony Pronski 


658-4499 




Jonn 1. bpaulaing 


boo-4ool 


Fire Chief 


Edward G. Bradbury 


658-3346 


Housing Authority Executive Director 


Maureen Hickey 


658-8531 


Inspector of Buildings 


John T. Spaulding 


658-4531 


Librarian 


Christina A. Stewart 


658-2967 


Mass. Bay Transportation 


Michael V. McCoy 


658-3311 


Authority Advisory Board 






Mass. Water Resource Authority 


H f 1 1 X ITT 1 

Michael J. Woods 


658-4711 


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Michael J. Mclnnis 




Museum Curator 


Theresa McDermott 


658-5475 


Planning/Conservation Director 


Carole S. Hamilton 


658-8238 


r lumuing ana. uras inspector 


Paul Raffi 
xaUl xvalll 


DOo-4001 


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iviicndtii rv. Degoms 


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r uoiic Duucnngs ouperincenaent 


vjreorge vv . nooper, 11 


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Public Health Director 


oneny ivi. r\ewnouse 


t)0o-4Zyo 


Public Health Nurse 


1 1 aCl ri. IVieilO 




Public Works Superintendent 


uonaia in. unusseii 




Reading Municipal Light Dept. 


ijreorge w . nooper, 11 


DOo-oUl / 


Advisory Board 


Thomas A. Ollila 


658-4858 


Recreation Director 


Deborah E. Cipriani 


658-4270 


Sealer of Weights and Measures 


Charles H. Carroll 


(617) 727-3480 x 21131 


Town Clerk 


Sharon A. George 


658-2030 


Town Counsel 


John C. Foskett 


(617) 951-2300 


Town Manager 


Jeffrey M. Hull 


658-3311 


Treasurer/Collector 


Pamela L. MacKenzie 


658-3531 


Veterans' Agent/Grave Officer 


Louis Cimaglia, IV 


694-2040 


Water & Sewer Superintendent 


Michael J. Woods 


658-4711 


Wiring Inspector 


Frederick Sutter 


658-4531 



-160- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON MUNICIPAL SERVICES GUIDE 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 

Board of Selectmen (Meeting dates - 2 nd & 4 th Monday evening 7:00 p.m.) 

The Board of Selectmen is recognized by the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as 
the Town's chief elected officials. The Board is responsible for appointing the Town Manager, the Board 
of Appeals, the Town Counsel and the Town Accountant. The Selectmen are also responsible for issuing 
numerous licenses including alcohol licenses, common victualer licenses and licenses to operate 
automobile dealerships. The Selectmen serve on a part-time basis. 

Phone 978- 658-3311 

Michael J. Newhouse, Chairman 
Michael L. Champoux 
Louis Cimaglia, IV 
Michael V. McCoy 
Judith L. O'Connell 

Town Manager - Jeffrey M. Hull - 978 - 658-3311 

The Town Manager is the Chief Administrative Officer of the Town. He supervises and directs the 
administration of all departments, boards and commissions except for the Board of Selectmen, Town 
Moderator, Finance Committee, Schools, Board of Appeals, Election Officers and Registrars of Voters. 
His duties include the appointment and removal, if necessary, of staff and members of certain boards 
and commissions; attendance at all regularly scheduled meetings of the Board of Selectmen to advise 
and recommend specific courses of action regarding issues affecting the Town; representing the Town in 
all litigation to which the Town is a party; acting as the Chief Fiscal Officer of the Town; preparation 
and administration of a comprehensive annual budget and directing the procurement of all goods and 
services on behalf of the Town. 

Assistant Town Manager - Kendra L. Amaral - 978 - 658-3311 

The Assistant Town Manager serves as the town's risk manager responsible for arranging the purchase 
of all lines of municipal insurance, chairing the town Safety Committee meetings, arranging for loss 
control training and working with insurance carriers to respond to claims against the town; serves in a 
human resources role informing employees about the various benefits available to them and establishing 
practices to comply with state and federal employment regulations; serves as a resource for departments 
seeking guidance on compliance with state procurement regulations; serves as the town's "point person" 
on cable licensing and assists the Town Manager with municipal administration including annual 
budget preparation, collective bargaining with unions and responding to questions or requests for 
assistance from residents. 

Town Clerk - Sharon A. George - 978 - 658-2030 

State law assigns duties to the Town Clerk in three major areas, the keeping of records and documents, 
the issuance of licenses and the administration of elections. In terms of the Town records the Clerk 
records proceedings of all town meetings and elections. The Town Clerk is Registrar of all vital statistics 
and Filing Officer for birth and death certificates, zoning decisions, etc. The Clerk's office also issues 
marriage licenses, dog licenses, etc. The Clerk is the Chief Election Official for all elections and serves 
as clerk of the Board of Registrars. 




-161- 



FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION 



Town Accountant - Michael Morris - 978 - 658-2029 

The Accounting Department reviews all requests for payment which involve Town funds. The 
department prepares warrants on a weekly basis for payment of all bills owed by the Town. The 
Accountant maintains the complete official financial records of the Town and prepares other financial 
records and reports as needed. The office provides information for the annual audit and bond ratings. 
Additionally, this office participates in the preparation of the annual budget. The Accounting 
Department is also responsible for the management of the Town's Information Systems, including 
financial systems, electronic mail and the Town's website. 

Principal Assessor - Karen L. Rassias - 978 - 658-3675 

The main responsibility of the Board of Assessors is to levy the property taxes necessary to meet 
appropriations and to insure that taxes are allocated equitably on the basis of the property owned by 
each taxpayer. The assessors are required to compute the tax rate and assess all real and personal 
property within the Town at fair-market value i.e. close to the true market value, except for property 
qualifying for preferential assessments such as forest, agricultural or recreation land. Tax rates depend 
on three factors: (1) the valuation of taxable property, (2) the tax levy or amount to be raised from 
property taxation and (3) property classification. 

Treasurer/Collector - Pamela L. MacKenzie - 978-658-3531 

The Treasurer/Collector is responsible for the billing and collection of monies due the Town including 
property and motor vehicle excise taxes and charges for water, sewer and ambulance services. This 
department is responsible for preparing the weekly payroll. The Treasurer/Collector monitors the 
Town's cash flow and arranges for short-term and long-term borrowing. The department serves as 
custodian of all Town funds. All municipal bank accounts are controlled by this office. The tax title and 
foreclosure proceedings for non-payment of taxes are handled by the Treasurer/Collector. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

Planning/Conservation Director - Carole S. Hamilton - 978 - 658-8238 

The major responsibilities of the Planning Department are to: undertake studies of land use, economic 
development, housing, transportation and other matters related to community development; compile and 
maintain maps, statistics and records related to land use and development; review individual proposals 
for development and for compliance with the subdivision regulations and zoning by-law; and prepare 
applications and administer grants related to planning and development. 

The primary function of the Conservation Department is the administration and enforcement of the 
Wetlands Protection Act Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 131, Section 40. The Act is intended to 
protect seven public interest issues related to wetlands: flood control, storm damage prevention, 
protection of public and private water supply, protection of ground water supply, prevention of pollution, 
protection of fisheries and protection of land containing shellfish. Some of the department's 
responsibilities include reviewing and inspecting development projects to insure their compliance with 
the Town and State wetlands statutes. In addition, the department manages several pieces of property 
throughout Town which have been placed into the Town's custody as conservation land. 

Building Inspector - John T. Spaulding - 978 - 658-4531 

The Building Inspector interprets and enforces the Town's Zoning By-Law, the State Uniform Building 
Code and certain other State codes. This department provides assistance to the Zoning Board of 
Appeals, architects, engineers, contractors and individual property owners in preparing zoning cases, 
plans and permit applications. The Building Inspector is responsible for plumbing, gas fitting and 
wiring inspections. 



-162- 



Director of Public Health - Shelly M. Newhouse - 978 - 658-4298 



The department provides two primary types of service. Inspectional services include restaurant, retail 
food stores, cafeterias in industrial buildings and schools, all mobile food trucks, ice cream trucks and 
caterers. In addition, the department conducts percolation tests for the location of septic systems, septic 
system inspections, nuisance inspections and responds to citizens complaints regarding dumping, air 
pollution and noise pollution and hazardous waste spills. The department provides public nursing 
services. This includes an annual rabies clinic for dogs and immunization for influenza, pneumonia, 
polio and various other diseases. The Town Nurse provides blood pressure and cholesterol screenings to 
Town residents. In addition, the nurse provides home health care visits to elderly residents of the Town. 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

Fire Chief - Edward G. Bradbury - 978 - 658-3346 -- Emergency Number - 9-1-1 

The Wilmington Fire Department is responsible for providing fire protection and emergency medical 
services to the Town of Wilmington. Statutory and Regulatory Laws and regulations are enforced 
through the Fire prevention Office. 

Inspections of fire alarm systems, smoke detectors, sprinkler systems, flammable and combustible 
liquids and explosives. Propane tank installations, oil burner installations and hazardous materials 
conducted by fire prevention and shift personnel. 

Police Chief - Michael R. Begonis - 978 - 658-5071 - Emergency Number - 9-1-1 

The principle responsibility of the Wilmington Police Department is the protection of people and 
property through enforcement of criminal laws and traffic regulations. The department also enforces 
certain local by-laws and provides public education such as the DARE program. Animal Control services 
are provided through this department. 

Dispatch Supervisor - April E. Kingston - 978 - 658-5071 -- Emergency Number - 9-1-1 

The Public Safety Dispatch Department is responsible for providing emergency communications for the 
Wilmington Police and Fire Departments. The department answers all E-9-1-1 lines, dispatches police, 
fire and EMS as needed and handles all incoming business calls for personnel of both departments. The 
department also assists other town departments in handling their after hours emergency calls such as 
water main breaks, animal control calls, notification to the DPW of road conditions and other public 
service needs. 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Superintendent - Donald N. Onusseit - 978 - 658-4481 or 978 - 658-4484 

The Public Works Department is responsible for highways, trees, parks, cemeteries, water, sewers, 
refuse and recycling. The Highway Division is responsible for the care and maintenance of the roads, 
sidewalks, parking areas and traffic lights. The Engineering Division assists town departments, boards 
and commissions with engineering related projects, such as drainage problems, review of subdivision 
plans and inspection of subdivision roadway construction. The Parks & Grounds Division is responsible 
for the maintenance of the Town's commons, parks and recreation areas. The Tree Division is 
responsible for the Town's public shade and ornamental trees and maintenance of the trees on the Town 
Common. The Public Works Department is also responsible for the operation of the Town's water 
supply, distribution, treatment systems, septic pumping stations, the sanitary sewer collection systems 
and the septic disposal station. These responsibilities are assumed by the Water & Sewer Department. 
The Department operates two water treatment plants in accordance with regulations established by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and the federal 
Environmental Agency (EPA). 



-163- 



In addition, the Public Works Department operates a curbside recycling program for many household 
items, maintains a composting center for brush and leaf disposal and oversees a contract for residential 
solid waste collection. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 

Superintendent - George W. Hooper. II - 978 - 658-3017 or 978 - 658-8124 

The Public Buildings Department is responsible for approximately 714,000 square feet of building space. 
The department provides custodial services for all school buildings and most of the general government 
buildings. In addition to the custodial services, the department repairs and maintains all of the Town's 
municipal buildings. Public Buildings provides for the complete set-up at all Town elections and the 
annual and special town meetings. 

HUMAN SERVICES 

Elderly Services Director - Theresa Marciello - 978 - 657-7595 

Wilmington Department of Elderly Services is committed to continuously advocating, promoting and 
providing services to Wilmington citizens 60 and over. These services contribute to the well-being of our 
seniors in the following ways: Information and Referral, Care Planning and Management, Health and 
Wellness Services, Transportation Service, Educational Programs, Counseling and Family Support 
Services, Financial and Health Insurance Counseling and Medical Advocacy. 

The Buzzell Senior Center has an environment that is not only inviting, but also safe and enjoyable for 
elderly residents to be able to communicate with their peers and participate in many daily classes and 
activities. 

Library Director - Christina A. Stewart - 978 - 658-2967 

The Wilmington Memorial Library has over 65,000 items including books and audio books, movies and 
music, games and software, newspapers and magazines. With a library card, residents can access 
authoritative databases, downloadable audio books and ebooks. The library is a member of the 
Merrimack Valley Library Consortium (MVLC), a system of 35 libraries with a common catalog 
providing access to more than 3 million items. Items owned by MVLC libraries may be requested for 
delivery to our library. The library has computer workstations with high speed Internet connection, 
Microsoft Office and black/white or color printing. Wireless access is available throughout the library. 
Scanners, copiers and a fax machine are also available. With supplemental support from the Friends of 
the Library, the library offers a variety of programming for all ages year round. The calendar of events 
can be found on the library's web site www.wilmlibrary.org. 

Recreation Director - Deborah E. Cipriani - 978 - 658-4270 

The goal of the Wilmington Recreation Department is to offer high quality, relevant and affordable 
programs and services to the residents of Wilmington. We provide a variety of leisure services that are 
under constant review, with a focus on evolving offerings to keep pace with local demand and changing 
trends. We offer classes for all ages, sports and other programs to promote physical health and day and 
overnight trips to provide life-long education and entertainment. Our commitment is to excellence in our 
programming, presented with superior customer service. 

Veterans' Agent - Louis Cimaglia. IV - 978 - 694-2040 

The Veterans' Agent administers a State public assistance program for veterans and their dependents 
who qualify. Financial aid which, is reimbursed in a large part by the Commonwealth, is rendered in 
the form of cash grants to cover such items as living expenses and medical bills. The Veteran's Agent 
also offers assistance in applying for pensions and other programs administered by the United States 
Veterans Administration. 

-164- 



Boards, Committees & Commissions 

Meeting Dates & Times 



Board, Committee, Commission 
APPEALS BOARD OF 


Date 


Room 


Building 


Time 


9nd Wprlnpcirlav 


q 


Town Hall 


i .uu p.m. 


ARTS COUNCIL FOR THE 


1ST \A7pr] npcrl a V 




Ari"s r^pnl"or 

ill 13 V^CllLGl 


7-00 n m 

f . \J*J p . Ill . 


ASSESSORS BOARD OF 

ilU k_/ X_J k_J KJ V_/ X VkJ -1— ' V-/ X XX IJ-/ \_/ X 


9ND Thursdav 

dml X 11 Ul OU(( \ 


2 


Town Hall 

1 UVV 11 J Idll 


i ooo a m 

lu.UU d.lll. 


CARTER LECTURE FUND 

V XXV X J — 4 X V IJ X.J V. X V X V A A X V-_V X 1 1 V 


As Nppdpd 

ilu 1 lCCUCU 








CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

VXJ1V1U X Ull x vyWlTllTllkJL/1 VI "1 UlVkJ 


Ac; MppHpH 








COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 


4 th Mondav 


9 


Town Hall 

X \J VV 11 X 1CU1 


q- 30 a m 

J, Uv d . Ill . 


CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

\J \S X ~ kj XJ1V V XX X X V-/ X > v^y \_/ XVXXVX X kj kj X W X » 


ist & 3RD Wednesday 


Q 


Town Hall 

1 U VV 11 1 Id 11 


7 00 n m 
1 . w\j p .111 . 


DISABILITIES WILMINGTON COMM 

X-/ X kJX XI. t X Ul X X X i kj j H IXJirl ill X W X "1 V-/ lYliTl ■ 


Ac; NppHpH 








ELDERLY SERVICES COMMISSION 


3RD Thursdav 

ij X 11 Ul OUUJ 




ftv r^pntpi* 

kJl . V^ClllfCl 


i . ovj p .in . 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 

x ii inii v_ i j v wiviivi i x x j j i j 


2ND Tuesdav 

w X UC OLA U V 


q 


Town Hall 

1UW11 1 Idll 


7 00 n m 
i . \j \j p . iii . 


HEALTH BOARD OF 


1ST & QRD Tupsdav 


q 


Town Hall 

xuwii nail 


«j.ow p.m. 


HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

XXX k_/ X v/lllVxlJJ V_/ V./ 1VX1VX X k_/ k_J X 1. ^« 


9ND Mondav 




T-Ta vnHpn TavpvTi 

1 1 d i HVXC 11 lavcin 


7 30 n m 


HOUSING AUTHORITY 

11 V k. k_ll X N V_A XX \-J 1 X X \_s X 11 X 1 


1 st Thursdav 

X 1 11 Ul O VX CI V 




T~)pTTiiTiP' ^V^v 

j-zc ixi xiit i» d^y 


10 00 a m 

IV/.uu d . Ill . 


HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

11 V 7 U kJllN \J 1 XXXV X 1> XliXvkJl 1 1 1 


Aft T^ppHpH 

ilO IN vl~ IX 




Town Hall 

1UW11 Hall 




LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

XJ X xJ X Wll V X 1 IvU U 1 UxJU 


qrd Tupsdav 




i j i uiai y 


7 00 n m 

f .uv |J . ill . 


OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION 


Aft NppHpH 




Town Hall 

1VJW11 Hull 




PERMANENT BUILDING COMM. 


As Needed 




Town Hall 


7:00 p.m. 


PLANNING BOARD 


1st & 3RD Tuesday 


9 


Town Hall 


7:30 p.m. 


RECREATION COMMISSION 


1st Thursday 


8 


Town Hall 


5:00 p.m. 


REG. VOC./TECH. SCHOOL COMM. 


Monthly 




Shaw. Tech. 


7:30 p.m. 


REGISTRARS, BOARD OF 


1st Monday 


12 


Town Hall 


12:00p.m. 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE 


2nd & 4TH Wednesday 


LIB 


High School 


7:00 p.m. 


SELECTMEN, BOARD OF 


2 nd & 4 th Monday 


9 


Town Hall 


7:00 p.m. 


WATER & SEWER COMMISSION 


3rd Thursday 


9 


Town Hall 


5:00 p.m. 



-165- 




STREET 


LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE(S) ACCEPTED 


Acorn Drive 


from Oakridge Circle thru cul-de-sac 


385 


1998 




Adams Street 


from Middlesex Avenue to Parker Street 


2,915 


1908 




Adelaide Street 


from Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 


666 


1976 




Agostino Drive 


from Gandalf Way 


999 


1979 




Agostino Drive 


from Agostino Drive to end of cul-de-sac 


580 


1996 




Aldrich Road 


from Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


6,740 


1894 




Allgrove Lane 


from Woburn Street 


470 


1993 




Allgrove Lane 


from Allgrove Lane to dead-end 


430 


1996 




Allenhurst Way 


from Woburn Street 


1,161 


1994 




Allen Park Drive 


from Fairmont Avenue to Fairmont Avenue 


2,319 


1971 


1984 


Amherst Road 


from Shawsheen Ave. to end of cul-de-sac 


1,500 


1996 




Andover Street 


from Salem Street 


180 


1894 




Andover Street 


from Andover Line to beyond Woburn Street 


11,300 


1894 


1970 


Andrew Street 


from Aldrich Road to beyond Houghton Road 


435 


1985 




Anthony Avenue 


from Salem Street to Catherine Avenue 


300 


1966 




Apache Way 


from Aldrich Road thru cul-de-sac 


1,675 


1998 




Apollo Drive 


from Charlotte Road to Draper Drive 


300 


1971 




Appletree Lane 


from Chestnut Street to Towpath Drive 


994 


1990 




Arlene Avenue 


from Salem Street to Ella Avenue 


3,754 


1966 


1978 


Ashwood Avenue 


from Andover Street thru cul-de-sac 


2,800 


1998 




Aspen Drive 


from Russell Road thru cul-de-sac 


320 


1999 




Auburn Avenue 


from Shawsheen Avenue 


755 


1945 




Avon Street 


from Avery Street thru cul-de-sac 


320 


1999 




Ayotte Street 


from Westdale Avenue to Crest Avenue 


240 


1947 




Bailey Road 


from Apache Way northeasterly to Bailey Rd. 


165 


1998 




Bailey Road 


from Aldrich Rd. southeasterly to Bailey Rd. 


538 


1999 




Baker Street 


from Brand Avenue to beyond Phillips Ave. 


684 


1945 




Baker Street 


from Existing Baker Street 


135 


2001 




Baland Road 


from Ballardvale Street 


540 


1972 




Ballardvale St. 


from Salem Street to Route 125 


965 


1894 




Ballardvale St. 


from Route 125 to Andover Line 


12,000 


1894 


1985 


Bancroft Street 


from Liberty Street 


400 


1952 




Barbara Avenue 


from Anthony Avenue to Dorothy Avenue 


850 


1966 




Beacon Street 


from Church Street to Belmont Avenue 


970 


1915 




Beech Street 


from Burlington Avenue to Byron Street 


1,005 


1947 




Beeching Avenue 


from Cunningham Street to Faulkner Avenue 


440 


1959 




Belmont Avenue 


from Columbia Street to State Street 


980 


1933 




Benson Road 


from Radcliff Road to Tewksbury Line 


616 


1971 




Biggar Avenue 


from Salem Street to Ring Avenue 


1,282 


1975 




Birch Road 


from Birch Rd. easterly thru cul-de-sac 


345 


1999 




Birchwood Road 


from Shady Lane Drive 


1,197 


1952 




Birchwood Road 


from Judith Road 


400 


1953 




Blanchard Road 


from Kendall Road 


625 


1989 




Blueberry Lane 


from Ashwood Avenue thru cul-de-sac 


1,600 


1998 




Boutwell Street 


from Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 


4,144 


1894 


1960 1971 


Brand Avenue 


from Bridge Lane 


510 


1933 


1943 


Brand Avenue 


from Baker Street to beyond Wisser Street 


950 


1933 


1943 


Brattle Street 


from Massachusetts Avenue to Garden Ave. 


1,066 


1945 




Brentwood Avenue 


from Woburn Street to Woodside Avenue 


1,017 


1938 




Bridge Lane 


from Shawsheen Avenue 


455 


1894 




Bridge Lane 


from Main Street to beyond Brand Avenue 


754 


1894 





-166- 



STREET 


LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE(S) ACCEPTED 


Broad Street 


from King Street 


1,377 


1954 




Burlington Avenue 


from Main Street to Burlington Line 


8,588 


1894 




Burnap Street 


from Grove Avenue 


1,145 


1953 




Burnap Street 


from Winchell Road 


484 


1945 




Burt Road 


from Cedar Street to beyond Water Street 


1,653 


1945 


1946 


Butters Row 


from Main Street to Chestnut Street 


3,577 


1894 




Buzzell Drive 


from Draper Drive to Evans Drive 


600 


1971 




uanai otreet 


trom onawsheen Avenue to Burt Road 


1 CAP 

l,DUO 


1939 


1955 


Carolyn Road 


from North Street to Marcia Road 


i,zbo 


1960 


1971 


Carson Avenue 


from Marie Drive to beyond Hathaway Road 


1 fll 1 


1961 




carter i^ane 


iioni ondWsn6en r\ve to oeyonu iNonoiK /we. 


1/111 
1,411 


1957 




uastie urive 


irom jjuriiiigton Ave teit to Duriington /we 


1 


1997 




uatneime Avenue 


irum .rvntnony /wenue to /vriene /ivenue 


1 C\C\(\ 


1966 




ueaar otreet 


irom Durt ivodu to ridrris otreet 


DO / 


1945 




ueaar urest rtoaa 


irom r inewooa rtoaa to tiuaitn rtoaa 


i i nn 

1, 1UU 


1963 




Central Street 


trom onuicn otreet to ivnaaiesex /wenue 




1950 




Chandler Road 


from Adams Street to Kelley Road 




1957 




Chapman Avenue 


from Hathaway Road to Sheridan Road 


1 K1K 
1,0 / 


1951 


1971 


cnariotte rtoaa 


from Gunderson Rd. to beyond Apollo Dr. 


soy 


1971 




Chase Road 


from Hathaway Road 




1953 




Cherokee Lane 


from Woburn St easterly thru cul-de-sac 


Q1 9 
O 1Z 


1999 




Chestnut Street 


irom jjurnngton /wenue to woourn j_/ine 


11/1 8f» 


1894 




Chisholm Way 


irom iviinK rtun to ena oi cui-ae-sac 




2008 




i^nurcn otreet 


irom ividin otreet to ivnaaiesex rivenue 


A 9R^ 
4, ZOO 


1894 




uiarK otreet 


irom ividin otreet to bnurcn otreet 


^,4 / VJ 


1894 


1969 


Clorinda Road 


from Agostino Drive 


887 
OO / 


1979 




V^OlOIlldl urivc 


T**/"* YV1 ^ 1 . / J /■ J V Ax T £± H 11 A + I'll /111 1 f\ l'\ "1/1 


O 1 o 


1997 




Cochrane Road 


from Forest Street to Wabash Road 




1947 




Columbia Street 


from Church St. to beyond Belmont Avenue 


1 1 Kf\ 

1, 10U 


1908 


1933 


Concord Street 


ii om reaerai otieet to rsortn rteaaing i_/ine 


0,oUo 


1894 




Congress Street 


from Forest Street to Burlington Line 


Q77 
all 


1939 




Cook Avenue 


irom iviain otreet 


81 Q 

Old 


1946 




Coolidge Road 


from Hathaway Road 


970 


1951 




Corey Avenue 


from Canal Street to Grand Street 


ODD 


1951 




Cornell Place 


from Fordham Road 


7/1 7 
/ 4 / 


1982 




Cottage Street 


from Main Street 


Q97 

yz / 






Cottonwood Circle 


from Blueberry Lane thru cul-de-sac 


280 


1998 




Crest Avenue 


from Ayotte Street 


558 


1947 




Cross Street 


from Main Street to Lowell Street 


697 


1894 




Crystal Road 


from Woburn Street to end of cul-de-sac 


895 


1996 




Cunningham St. 


from Salem Street to Beeching Avenue 


2,447 


1944 


1952 1953 


Cushing Drive 


from Shawsheen Avenue 


990 


1993 




Cypress Street 


from Glen Road 


260 


1951 




Dadant Drive 


irom iNortn otreet to JMortn otreet 


1 7ftf) 
1, / DU 


1964 




Davis Road 


from Main Street 


OUU 


1952 




Dayton Road 


from Hathaway Road 


1 7fl 
1 / U 


1951 




Dell Drive 


from Burlington Avenue 


1 7CM 

1, <y4 


1958 


1971 


uexier otreet 


t\*/~iyy1 l\ 1 f 1 1 r"l t y'/^ C\ \ 

irom ividin otreet 


480 


1979 




Dobson Street 


from Glen Road to beyond Garden Avenue 


1,402 


1954 




Dogwood Lane 


from Blueberry Lane to Ashwood Avenue 


550 


1997 




Dorchester Street 


from Billerica Line 


1,214 


1951 




Dorothy Avenue 


from Arlene Avenue to Barbara Avenue 


1,490 


1960 




Douglas Avenue 


from Palmer Way 


1,017 


1989 




Draper Drive 


from Gunderson Road to Evans Drive 


1,560 


1959 


1971 



-167- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Di'ury Lane 


11 om viien ivodu to ocnooi uixcci 


UOO 


1 


Dublin Avenue 


ix om iviain Direct 


ouu 


1 Q^l 

iyo i 


Dunton Road 


11 Om INdSSdU revenue 






F.amp^ Stvppt 


from Main Stvppt to Wohurn Strppt 

11U 111 X » X CX 111 kJ tl t IU T T \J Kf Hi IX Y J I I ^ V I 


3,200 


1894 


F.avlpc: Rnw 


from Rontp fi2 

XX W 111 1VU U. 1 ' W^ 


820 


1994 


F.HwavH RoaH 

lJU VV alu IVUOU 


from Forp^t Strppt to hpvond Raldwin RH 

11 U III X U1COI > — ) Li L 1/ W WC J v ilU UC11U VV 111 X IU . 


450 


1947 


Elizabeth Drive 


from Butters Row thru cul-de-sac 


1,348 


1999 


Ella Avenue 


from Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


1,043 


1978 


H/iwooo. rtoaa 


irom rorest oireei 


RAO 


lyoo 


Emerson Street 


IlOlll r dUlKntil mtjnue LU WdKWUOU xvOdU 


oyu 


1 Qi^l 

lyo i 


ILlxicxdlU rlVcIlUc 


llUIIl .rVllUUVcl ul. Wcbtcxiy III! U lUl-Uc - Sdt 


tuu 


9000 


H/ngiewooo uuve 


irom xvenwoou unvc 




1 Q71 


jCjvans urive 


IlOlll VjrUIlUcx bOIl XVOdU LU l^ldpcl UllVc 


9 071 


1 Q71 


iwereLi /wenue 


ii om r duiKner mcnue 10 v_/Uiiiiiiigiidm oiicct 


480 


1 Q7Q 
ly I o 


FairfiplH RoaH 

x an iiciw. ivuau. 


from IVTflin Strppt 

ii uiii iviani uticct 


1,299 


1946 


Fairmpjiflnw T?oaH 

1_ all XXXCa.iXU W A IU a W. 


frnTYi Nirlinl^ Strppt tn Nirrinl^ Strppt 

IX \J 111 j.N ILJIUJo UtlCCl IU 1 X 1L 1 1*^/1 UtlCCt 


2,328 


1958 

X %J KJKJ 


T^airmont Avptiiip 
i lui ilium nvcnuc 


frnTTi A/Tollov Rn?id 

xx \j hi iviuiiu \ ivwau 


952 


1971 


Fnivvipw Avpnup 

x an view nvcnuc 


from Statp Strppt 

iium kJi^a.L'C uti cct 


648 


1933 


FflTiPllil Drivp 
x aiic uxi x-/xivc 


frnTYi TVTjm^ Avpnup to ISpvond rTfirvfirH Avpnup 

ii u xxi ivxaoo. nvcnuc tw i_/ un va x x ax vaiu nvcnuc 


790 


1950 


T^fl ullcnpv Avptiiip 

1 a UxXvllC 1 xi veil tic 


frnrn frlpTi RnaH to ^Tflfolm Strppt 

XX XXX VJ 1C11 llUfHl V\J UaLUUO Utl CCl 


1,946 


1944 


T^a n lie npr Avptiiip 
x c*. nixviic i nvcnuc 


frorn Ffliillcripr Avp nortlip?) ^tprl v to dpaH pnH 

ii u xxx x auiiviici nvc nui tiicao tci i y lw vxcau ciivx 


125 


1999 


T?av Strppt 

X CIV ULICCI 


froTii Olpn Roj^H to fxflrdpn Avpnup 

ii u ixx vjxcii i lu a lx Lu vjaiucii nvcnuc 


714 


1938 


TTpHpral Strppt 

X CUClul ULICCI 


from TVTiHrllp^px Avpnup to Woburn Strppt 

xx yj XXX XVXl VXVX1C OCA *. J. V C ll U.C IU ' t UU Ul XX Kj IX cct 


5,740 


1894 


Fpnwav Strppt 

X C 11 VV CX V uticct 


from Rollirm Rd to pnH of rul-dp-sao 

XX Will X IW X XX XX O XVvl tu C X X VI Ul V U.1 Vlv O ( X. 


375 


2004 


TTpvciicnri T?oaH 

X ClgUoUll XtWOW. 


from Srifl w^Vippn Avptiiip 

xx win L/iia w once ii ixvciiuc 


1,073 


1967 


x ciiiuaiixvo iiuau 


from A/Till RoaH to pnd of r*nl-dp-^?ip 

xx win ivxxxx i luau lu cnu. ui wlxi uc ogl, 


550 


1996 


Fiorpn 7a Dvivp 

x lui t iif-a uiivc 


from Andovpr Strppt 

11 W 111 ZXllUW V CI uticct 


4,087 


2012 


Flagstaff Road 

X lacol all iiuau 


from ^lfViolci Strppt 

11 Will IXlLllUlo UtlCCt 


587 


1989 


T^lptfnpv Tifinp 
x xc italic x uaiic 


from rCilmflrnoplr Strppt to A/rorprflri T?OflH 

XX W1XX 1 Villi 1 a 1 11ULI\ U Ll cc t tw xvxwi ga.ii XtWaLX 


792 


1977 


T^lorfin alp A vpniiP 
x iui auaic nvcnuc 


from Rurlincrton Avptiiip 
xxwm uuiiiiigtuii nvcnuc 


627 


1970 


Flynn Way 


from Federal Street to end of cul-de-sac 


680 


1996 


Foley Farm Road 


from Kilmarnock Street to end of cul-de-sac 


363 


2004 


Fordham Road 


ii om iNorin rteauing i^ine 




1 Q71 
iy / 1 


Forest Street 


iroiri ounington /vvenue to r\iaricn xvoao. 


4 1 OO 

c i., 1UU 


1 ftQ4 


Fox Run Drive 


from High Street 


Q7^ 


1 QRQ 
iyoy 


Franklin Avenue 


from Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


7QQ 


1 Q7Q 

Vo I o 


Frederick Drive 


from Salem Street 


1 070 
1,U / u 


lyoo 


Freeport Drive 


from Park Street to Lucaya Circle 


9 Oftfi 

z,uoo 


1 Q7Q 

iy / y 


CXc\ n H a If Wsiv 
VJallilall W a. V 


i vr» TTi CW oti RaqH \c\ Aco^tino T^rivrp 

11 Will VJllCll lVUo.il LU AgUollllU -L/llVC 


549 


1979 


(rntPnniKP T ,anp 
vj ate nu Hoc xjchic 


from r Pr^\xf ri t» tVi T?05i n 

llUlll lUWUdtxl lVUo.il 


380 


1994 


rxPAvtv strppt 

VJCal IV ullCCL 


TrfiTYl RlYiO" A\7PTillP 
11 Ulll IVlilg rlVCllUC 


627 


1989 


(1 Ion T?nc»ri 
VJlcll IV Ua.il 


llUill IvllUUlcocX AVcIlUt; LU IVlolll ullccl 


6 870 

W, O t \J 


1894 

xoct 


VJlcllUdlc VvllClc 


11 (Jill vJlcIl ItUdU LU J_jdWlcIlCc ullccl 


1 

X j out 


1 Q«=i2 

1 . ' - ) —i 


VJlcIlVlcW XVUdU 


ii um ouiicrtJbL /avciiuc 


OwO 


X Xjxju 


VJlUlld VV ciy 


llUlll DlUdU. uLlccl 


770 


1Q8Q 

x cue 


Oowinp' Road 

" — A \J »Y 1 lib 1 vvy CAVA 


from Park Strppt to MarouR Road 

11 V 111 A. LA. 1 IV UvlvV^l tW XVlCA.luU.kJ7 1 vVUU 


941 


1956 


Grace Drive 


from Shawsheen Ave. to beyond Melody Lane 


2,514 


1966 


Grand Avenue 


from Corey Avenue 


815 


1952 


Grant Street 


from Federal Street 


780 


1943 


Great Neck Drive 


from Woburn Street 


536 


1989 


Grove Avenue 


from Main Street to Lake Street 


4,147 


1910 


Grove Street 


from Reading Line 


120 


1957 


Gunderson Road 


from Marie Drive to beyond Evans Drive 


1,506 


1959 



-168- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Hamlin Lane 


from Lawrence Street 


540 


1962 


Hanover Street 


from Atlantic Avenue 


574 


1988 


Hanson Road 


from Woodland Road 


838 


1969 


Hardin Street 


from Aldrich Road to Jaquith Road 


428 


1951 


Harnden Street 


from Main Street to Glen Road 


600 


1895 


Harold Avenue 


from Shawsheen Avenue to Reed Street 


1,312 


1971 


Harris Street 


from Burlington Avenue to Cedar Street 


806 


1945 


Harvard Avenue 


from Main Street to River Street 


430 


1951 


Hathaway Road 


from Woburn Street to Evans Drive 


3,270 


1951 


Hawthorne Road 


from Woburn Street 


230 


1956 


Heather Drive 


from Freeport Drive to North Reading Line 


1,286 


1979 


Henrv L. Drive 


from Woburn Street 


651 


1993 


High Street 


from Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


3,585 


1894 


Hillside Way 


from Chestnut Street to Burlington Line 


2,230 


1914 


Hilltoo Road 


from Suncrest Avenue 


364 


1959 


Moh^on Avpnup 

X 1U KJ O W A A L IV v_- A 1 


from Pine Avenue to beyond Wisser Street 


1,560 


1945 


Wnnk'in^ Stvppt 

J. \\J yj xVlllo k_7 H. CUl 


from Sbawshppn Avptiup to Rillprica Linp 

ii uiii kjiicivvoiiccii nvciiuc lU 1 ' 1 1 1 1 IV. (_A J — J 1 1 IV. 


3,051 


1894 


T~fni]p*htOii Rnfifl 

X A \J AA Cm. AA tUll A IVJ CA \_A 


from Kendall Street to Andrew Street 


1,702 


1985 


Industrial Way 


from Woburn Street to West Street 


4,430 


1974 


Isabella Way 


from West Street 


385 


2001 


Jaques Lane 


from Lake Street to the end of cul-de-sac 


873 


2012 


Jaquith Road 


from Shawsheen Avenue 


1,398 


1938 


Jere Road 


from Fairmeadow Road to Fairmeadow Road 


1,248 


1968 


Jewel Drive 


from Eames Street 


1,303 


1985 


Jones Avenue 


from Glen Road 


717 


1940 


Jonspin Road 


from Andover Street 


3,800 


1993 


Judith Road 


from Cedar Crest Road to Birchwood Road 


400 


1953 


Kajin Way 


from Woburn Street 


455 


1989 


Kelley Road 


from Chandler Road 


923 


1957 


Kendall Street 


from Aldrich Road to Blanchard Road 


1,420 


1945 


Kenwood Avenue 


from Woburn St. to beyond Englewood Dr. 


1,725 


1970 


Kiernan Avenue 


from Lowell Street to beyond Naples Road 


693 


1958 


Kilmarnock Street 


from West Street to beyond Morgan Road 


1,840 


1894 


King Street 


from Glen Road to Broad Street 


2,400 


1940 


King Street Ext. 


from Glen Road 


487 


1979 


Kirk Street 


from Main Street 


575 


1951 


Lake Street 


from Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


3,855 


1894 


Lang Street 


from Bancroft Street 


409 


1952 


Laurel Avenue 


from Parker Street to Molloy Road 


659 


1950 


Lawrence Court 


from Lawrence Street 


728 


1956 


Lawrence Street 


from Glen Road to Shady Lane Drive 


4,013 


1956 


Ledgewood Road 


from Suncrest Avenue 


383 


1959 


Leonard Lane 


from Hopkins Street to end of cul-de-sac 


540 


2011 


Lexington Street 


from Cunningham St. to Morningside Drive 


714 


1974 


Liberty Street 


from Federal Street 


740 


1943 


Lincoln Street 


from Federal Street 


720 


1943 


Linda Road 


from High Street to beyond Pineridge Road 


1,760 


1950 


Lloyd Road 


from Main Street 


1,050 


1951 


Lockwood Road 


from Ballardvale Street 


977 


1957 


Longview Road 


from Middlesex Avenue 


650 


1959 


Lorin Drive 


from Swain Road 


560 


1992 


Loumac Road 


from Drury Lane 


510 


1963 



1949 1951 



1971 



1945 



169- 



QTRTTTTT 
o 1 rvrjili 1 


T HP A TTOM 






Lowell Street 


from Main Street to Reading Line 


10,152 


1894 


Lowell St. Park 


from Lowell Street 


580 


1908 


Lucaya Circle 


from Heather Drive to Freeport Drive 


2,469 


1979 


Mackey Road 


from Federal Street 


250 


1943 


Magazine Road 


from Wisser Street 


320 


1973 


Magazine Street 


from Taplin Avenue 


190 


1973 


Main Street 


from Tewksbury Line to Woburn Line 


21,387 


1894 


Manning Street 


from Aldrich Road to Moore Street 


970 


2002 


Marcia Road 


from North Street to beyond Carolyn Rd. 


2,806 


1962 


Marcus Road 


from Gowing Road 


2,315 


1958 


Marie Drive 


from Woburn St. to beyond Gunderson Road 


1,525 


1961 


Marion Street 


from Burlington Ave. to beyond Clifton St. 


1,876 


1945 


Marion Street 


from Marion St. westerly to Marion St. 


975 


1995 


Marion Street 


from Marion St. southeasterly to Marion St. 


1,133 


2000 


Marion Street 


from Marion St. southerly an additional 


950 


2001 


Marion Street 


from Marion St. easterly an additional 


715 


2012 


Marjorie Road 


from Main Street 


1,392 


1951 


Massachusetts Ave. 


from Main Street to beyond Brattle St. 


810 


1945 


McDonald Road 


from Salem Street 


2,621 


1944 


Meadow Lane 


from Suncrest Avenue 


364 


1957 


Meadow Lane 


from Meadow Lane thru cul-de-sac 


115 


1997 


Melody Lane 


from Shawsheen Avenue to Grace Drive 


245 


1966 


Meadow Brook Rd. 


from Factory Rd. southeasterly 


204 


2001 


Middlesex Avenue 


from Main Street to Salem Street 


12,140 


1894 


Miles Street 


from Main Street to Hobson Avenue 


380 


1945 


Mill Road Ext. 


from Mill Road to end of cul-de-sac 


725 


2011 


Miller Road 


from Glen Road 


638 


1945 


Molloy Road 


from Lowell Street 


988 


2001 


Moore Street 


from Shawsheen Ave to beyond Wedgewood Ave 


1,528 


1967 


Moore Street 


from Existing Moore Street 


630 


2001 


Morgan Road 


from Kilmarnock Street 


653 


1977 


Morningside Drive 


from Lexington Street to Fairfield Road 


693 


1974 


Morse Avenue 


from Woburn Street to beyond Lawn Street 


1,360 


1939 


Mystic Avenue 


from Middlesex Avenue 


1,298 


1908 


My Way Circle 


from Fiorenza Drive 


341 


2012 



1957 1958 



Nassau Avenue 


from Shawsheen Avenue to Dunton Road 


1,566 


1946 


Nathan Road 


from Senpek Road 


1,057 


1971 


Navajo Drive 


from Chestnut Street thru cul-de-sac 


585 


2006 


Nelson Way 


from High Street thru cul-de-sac 


800 


2002 


Nichols Street 


from Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3,801 


1894 


Nickerson Avenue 


from West Street 


953 


1947 


Norfolk Avenue 


from Carter Lane to Nassau Avenue 


537 


1954 


North Street 


from Middlesex Avenue to Marcia Road 


3,515 


1945 


N. Washington Ave. 


from Agostino Drive 


858 


1979 


Nottingham Drive 


from Stonehedge Drive thru cul-de-sac 


480 


1997 


Nunn Road 


from Kelley Road 


214 


1965 


Oak Street 


from Salem Street 


355 


1951 


Oakdale Road 


from Short Street to Judith Road 


2,301 


1950 


Oakridge Circle 


from Gowing Road to Gowing Road 


1,730 


1958 


Oakwood Road 


from Main Street to beyond Emerson Street 


800 


1946 


Olson Street 


from Church Street 


122 


1957 


Oxbow Drive 


from Woburn Street 


1,751 


1994 



-170- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LE NGTHD ATE (S) ACCEPTED 



Palmer Way 


from Middlesex Avenue 


1,437 


1989 


Park Street 


from Woburn Street to No. Reading Line 


4,180 


1895 


Parker Street 


from Lowell Street to Blackstone Street 


2,000 


1919 


Patches Pond Lane 


from Chestnut Street to a dead end 


1,185 


1990 


Patricia Circle 


from Dell Drive 


595 


1958 


Pershing Street 


from Federal Street 


720 


1943 


Phillips Avenue 


from Wild Avenue to beyond Baker Street 


1,519 


1946 


Pilcher Drive 


from the end of Gearty Street 


410 


1989 


Pilling Road 


from Hathaway Road 


954 


1959 


Pine Avenue 


from Main Street to Hobson Avenue 


380 


1945 


Pineridge Road 


O XT i 1 O i i_i x ' 1 T> J 

trom North Street to Linda Road 


914 


1960 


Pineview Road 


from Cobalt Street to Adelman Road 


450 


1953 


Pinewood Road 


from Shady Lane Drive to Oakdale Road 


1,364 


1954 


Pleasant Road 


from Middlesex Avenue to Linda Road 


750 


1962 


Powder House Cir. 


from Middlesex Avenue 


710 


1954 


Presidential Dr. 


from Boutwell Street 


826 


1977 


Presidential Dr. 


from Presidential Drive thru cul-de-sac 


768 


1998 


Progress Way 


from Industrial Way 


630 


1974 


1 liioi 1 Run 

v^udii rvuii 


ii um VVUUU111 OUccl 


JUU 


1 QQ9 


RadcliffRoad 


from South Street to Benson Road 


355 


1971 


Railroad Avenue 


from Clark Street 


650 


1909 


Reading Avenue 


from Oakwood Road 


215 


1979 


Reading Avenue 


from Faulkner Ave northwesterly to dead-end 


160 


1997 


Redwood Terrace 


from Kenwood Avenue 


645 


1970 


Reed Street 


from Shawsheen Ave. to beyond Harold Ave. 


1,090 


1971 


Research Drive 


from Ballardvale Street 


1,817 


1989 


Richmond Street 


from Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


1,800 


1973 


Ridge Road 


from Suncrest Avenue 


365 


1956 


Ring Avenue 


from Salem Street to Biggar Avenue 


1,150 


1975 


River Street 


from Massachusetts Avenue to Harvard Ave. 


453 


1962 


Roberts Road 


from Burlington Ave. to Burlington Ave. 


1,861 


1967 


Rollins Road 


from Marion Street to Fenway Street 


200 


1954 


Roosevelt Road 


from Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1,980 


1946 


Route 62 


from Middlesex Avenue to Salem Street 


3,343 


1958 


Royal Street 


from Salem Street 


1,043 


1951 



Sachem Circle 


from Elizabeth Drive thru cul-de-sac 


520 


2005 


Salem Street 


from Tewksbury Line to beyond Ballardvale Street 


8,895 


1894 


Salem Street 


from No. Reading Line to beyond Woburn St. 


6,475 


1894 


Sarafina's Way 


from Hopkins St. thru cul-de-sac 


450 


1995 


Scaltrito Drive 


from Salem Street 


785 


1974 


School Street 


from Middlesex Ave. to beyond Drury Lane 


1,139 


1915 


Seneca Lane 


from Tacoma Drive to Tacoma Drive 


1,065 


2002 


Seneca Lane 


from Tacoma Drive to end of cul-de-sac 


530 


2004 


Senpek Road 


from Wildwood Street to Nathan Road 


280 


1971 


Sequoia Drive 


from Cherokee Lane to end of cul-de-sac 


1,152 


2008 


Serenoa Lane 


from Woburn St. westerly thru cul-de-sac 


600 


1999 


Sewell Road 


from Hathaway Road 


300 


1955 


Shady Lane Drive 


from Middlesex Ave. to Lawrence Street 


2,904 


1950 


Shawsheen Avenue 


from beyond Richmond St. to Billerica Ln. 


11,845 


1894 


Sherburn Place 


from Shawsheen Avenue 


723 


1975 


Sheridan Road 


from Woburn Street to Hathaway Road 


1,021 


1951 


Sherwood Road 


from Forest Street to Cochrane Road 


445 


1971 


Silver Lake Ave. 


from Lake Street to Dexter Street 


455 


1954 



-171- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTHDATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Somerset Place 


from Mystic Avenue easterly thru cul-de-sac 


878 


2000 




Sparhawk Drive 


from Park Street to Heather Drive 


361 


1979 




Snrnppwood Road 


(mm Shadv Lanp Drivp 

1 i W 111 kJ lli HI \ 1 1 Cl 1 1 1. , 1 ' 1 1 V \.. 


690 


1952 

1 w _ 




Statp Strppt 


from Rplmont Avpnup tn Eairvipw Avpnup 

1 l ''111 1 n 1 111 w i| l . 1 V IT 11 Uv 1 \j x an view ilVCllUC 


315 


1933 

X w w w 




StonphpHp p p Drivp 

kj CW 11C HCUgC XJ X 1VC 


from Cla^tlp Dr northprlv thru (Mil-Hp-^ap 

11UU1 VJdotlC 1^1. 11U1 lllCi 1 » LIU U LU1 ill 


1 400 

X 5 i w w 


1997 




Stront Avpnup 


from LowpII Strppt 

1 1 ''111 1 'U U 1 11 Utlwt 


908 


X W w w 




Qiinp VP Qt A VP n 1 1 P 

.HUH It. M XX VCll C4C 


frnm Wp«n1 Strppt tn TiPdppwooH RnaH 

1 1 v ) i ii i > v o i t j urn lu ucucc wuuu i v. d i_i 


1 24fi 


1 954 




Swain RoaH 

UW dill ivuau 


frnm RurlinPi'nn Avptihp tn Enrp^t Strppt 

11 Will 11 111 1111C,!, V.J11 nvcuuc 1 \J 1 U 1 C J L uticct 


2 290 


1922 

X W — r — 


1929 


Taft Road 

1 ".111 1 l W 1 1 '. 1 


from Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1,986 


1938 




Tanlin Avpnup 

x d uiiii x x v v ii 


from Wisspr Strppt 

J. 1 V 111 I I 1 . 1 . _ ' V 1 KJ I 1. v V I 


461 


1946 




Tanlin Avpnup 

J. d. J ' 1111 X IV VII L* V 


from Bakpr Strppt 

11 111 1 ' < A 1 \ V 1 ( / I 1 ' v 1 


900 


1946 




TpttitiIp Strppt 

X ' 1UU I v > ' LI * L 


from Church Strppt 

X X \J 111 V ' X J. \X 1 V 11 U L/ 1 W C \J 


214 


1911 




Thrush Road 

X 111 Uoll X WJ CI \x 


from Salpm Strppt to TVTarip Drivp 

U U ill KJ Cl Iv XXX KJ I U 1 VI Cl 1 J v_ XJ I 1 V C 


400 


1961 

X W W X 




Thurston Avenue 


from Church Street to beyond Kidder Place 


623 


1907 




Tomahawk Drive 


from Aldrich Road 


575 


1989 




TYvwnath Drivp 

X \J W |J Cl Lll X-/X 1VC 


from Townath Drivp tn a Hpj^H ptiH 

iium i u w ucitii xj live y yj a uc ci vx eixvx 


4fi3 

"WW 


1990 

X WWW 




Towpath Drive 


from Chestnut Street to Towpath Drive 


914 


1990 




Towpath Drive 


from Towpath Drive 


870 


1993 




TowTiath Dnvp 

IwiYUubXI 1/11VC 


from Tnwnfith Drivp to Ruttpr^ Row 

11W111 X \J W VJ CXKjXX XJ 11VC IU XJ unci O 11UVV 


886 


1996 

X www 




TvflPV f^lVflp 
X X CL\, V V— ' 11 


Trnm W^Mhnvn Strppt 

XX yJ 111 Vi UU Ul 11 kJ IICCL 


67R 

W / W 


1992 

X \J \J £d 




Truman Road 


from Hathaway Road 


300 


1953 




Tlnnampd Strppt 

i 1 1 1 ci mc \x i j ti t 


from Salpm Strppt to Andovpr Strppt 

XX \J XXX KJ (11C III kJ llCCt \j\J X 111V1U v e 1 ticct 


470 


1958 




TTnton Court 

KJ yj CW11 V_y vJ UX L 


from AnHovpr Strppt 

xx wixi niiuuvci uiicct 


500 

WWW 


1894 




v aiy xi iJtiin 


from Snlpm Str*PPt 
xx vj ixi kj die 111 uiicct 


608 

Uu(J 


1989 

X w Cl w 




Vpra nd a Avpti hp 

v ci u ii vi cl nvciiuc 


from IVTain Strppt 

11 Will XVXdXXl Ul I L L I 


847 


1916 




Virpnnia Roan" 

V IX wllllCl IVWOU 


from No RpaHinp 1 Tjtip to No Rpfldinp" Tiinp 

XX \J 111 j- > V J . X tC Cl LXXX1 1 J 1 1 1 C LU i. v yj . X IC Cl kX 111 1^1 lie 


1,105 


1954 




Walcpfipld Avpnup 

n ci xvc 1 1 c i v.* nvciiuc 


from Ri]rlcinp*hfim St p^^tprlv to dpaH pnH 

ii um ii m jAiii^ucini kJi . caoici i v iu vxecxvx eiivx 


355 


1999 




Wallrpr Strppt 


from IVTci i n Stvppt 

XX Will IVXClXll > 111 CCl 


423 

1 — <J 


1958 

X W W(J> 




Wfivrpn Roarl 

I V Cl 1 1C11 1 VWCl W. 


from W^icrritman RoaH to Tpwlr^hnrv Tiinp 
xx win v v 1^11 1 in ci ii i iuuu lu x e vv ivo u ui y i— iiiie 


97 


1954 




Wa^hirtp'tnri Avptihp 

vy uoiiiiic tun nvciiuc 


from Cleric Strppt to Stonp Strppt 

xx kj xxx v_y i ci i XV uticcL u w kj tu i ic kjnecu 


1,650 


1920 




W/pHnor Strppt 


fvATYi Kn vl i n crtr\T\ A\7Ptiiip 

11 will X_> U.I llll&tWll AVClIUC 


fi77 


1 9fi9 

X WWW 




\A/pH crowoon Avpttiip 

VV ClXgC WUVJIX xl Veil Lit; 


fvom IVTr^ovp StvPPt 
liijilx iviuuie OLxecL 


47fi 


1 9fi7 

X WW 1 




WpH fpwnnn A vpn np 
vv ccigc wuuix riven uc 


fvom \A/pHd"PwooH Avp ^ontnP^iQt thru piil-np-^cip 
xi win vv cutcwuuu nvc ow ci Liiecio l liix ci c lii vxe ocie 


75 


1 997 

X WW I 




Wpcf Strppt 


tvam X\fr\\\iiYir\ Strppt to Rpflnincr T ,inp 
ii win v\ uuinii ou cci lu xvectLiiiig x_jiiie 


8 ^72 


1894 


1978 

X W 1 O 


\A/OCi"f1Cllp AlfPnilP 

vvcoLixcxie rxveiiuc 


Tvr^m XA/pgi" ^Ji'rppi' 
xx u ill w cSL uliccL 


1211 

1 . — I 1 


1 942 

X ^ / i — 




VV lelYo V^llele 


fynm H:\mvptt A\7PnilP 
11 uiii xliveleLt xT.Velllxe 




1 971 

X W / X 




\A/i 0*n1"TYl El Ti KnJlH 
VV lgllLXXXCt.il XVUcxLX 


tvatiI W^Qrvcin Rnan i*o Tpwlrcnn w T.itip 
11 Ulxl VVctxlell HUali LU 1 cWlvoUUl V 1-illlC 


— O -J 


1 954 




\A/iln A voniio 
VV 11U. XT.VcxlLie 


rynm livniro A iron no 
llUlll vJTxUVc /lVellUc 


J. , yJOxJ 


1910 




Wl^ 1 H whaH Qrvppf 
VV llvXWvJWU ulicci 


fvAyyi IVTi ci H Iocpv Ax/omiP tr\ \A/riniim fttvppi" 
llUlxl IVllLlllleoc A r\. Veil LXc LU VV UUU1 11 ullcel 


W, XwC'W 


1894 




Wfilliam^ Avptihp 
H xxxxcxxixo n veil uc 


from lVTsi 1 n Strppt 
xx win iv i (i 1 11 kill ee L 


706 

t w w 


1940 

X W i w 




Wilson Street 


from Federal Street 


760 


1943 




Wilton Drive 


from Shawsheen Avenue 


1,151 


1966 




Winchell Road 


from Grove Avenue to Burnap Street 


193 


1945 




Wing Road 


from Woburn Street 


746 


1958 




Wisser Street 


from Main Street to Brand Avenue 


1,146 


1950 




Woburn Street 


from Andover Street to Woburn Line 


23,122 


1894 


1978 


Woodland Road 


from Lowell Street 


1,174 


1969 





-172- 



) 



* * For Your Information * * 



Department Phone Directory 



Department 




Telephone Number 


Accountant 




694-2029 




Animal Control 




658-5071 




Appeals Board 




658-4531 




Arts Center 




657-3887 




Assessor 




658-3675 




Building Inspector 




658-4531 




Cemetery Department 




658-3901 




Collector of Taxes 




658-3531 




Elderly Services 




657-7595 




Engineer 




658-4499 




Fire Department 




658-3346 


(Business Phone) 






9-1-1 


(EMERGENCY) 


Fire Prevention 




694-2006 




Harnden Tavern Museum 




658-5475 




Health, Board of 




658-4298 




Housing Authority 




658-8531 




Library 




658-2967 




Nurse 




658-4298 




Planning/Conservation 




658-8238 




Plumbing Inspector 




658-4531 




Police Department 




658-5071 








9-1-1 


(EMERGENCY) 






657-8368 


(TDD) 


Public Buildings Department 




658-3017 




Pubbc Works Department 




658-4481 




Recreation Department 




658-4270 




School Department 




694-6000 




Selectmen, Board of 




658-3311 




Town Clerk 




658-2030 




Town Manager 




658-3311 








694-1417 


(TDD) 


TVea mirpr 




658-3531 




Tree Department 




658-2809 




Veterans' Agent 




694-2040 




Water & Sewer 




658-4711 








658-3116 


(Billing) 


Food Pantry 




658-7425 




Shawsheen Tech 




667-2111 




WCTV 




657-4066 




Comcast 


888 - 


633-4266 




Keyspan 


800 - 


548-8000 




Mosquito Control 


508 - 


393-3055 




Reading Light Dept. 


781 - 


944-1340 




Transitional Services 


800 - 


249-2007 




Verizon 


888 - 


438-3467 





Please Save for Future Reference 



A special "thank you" to all those who contributed 
photographs for the enhancement of our Annual Report. 



Far better is it to dare mighty things, to win glorious 
triumphs, even though checkered by failure, than to take 
rank with those poor spires who neither enjoy much nor 
suffer much because they live in the grey twilight that 
knows not victory or defeat. 



7 Tieodore Roose \ clt